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Can I restore WIN7 from a cloned drive?


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#1 jcmack

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Posted 21 January 2017 - 06:12 PM

Last year when MS was sending out WIN10 I cloned the 500 gig drive in my relatively new HP laptop that was using WIN7 64 bit to an external 2.5 USB drive. Then I downloaded WIN10 to the laptop. I rarely use the laptop and my 2 desktops are running WIN7. I'd like to restore the laptop to WIN7 again. I tried cloning the laptop drive from the ext USB drive and the laptop won't boot. The external drive won't boot from the startup boot selection when hooked up externaly. I have since restored WIN10 to the laptop from a backup .img file. I guess the next step would be to remove  the laptop internal drive, replace it in the laptop with the external drive, and see if the laptop will boot to WIN7. 

I'm hoping my description was not too hard to understand. Should the USB external WIN7 cloned drive boot when hooked up as an external device?

 

Thanks, Jim



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#2 sflatechguy

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 09:55 AM

When you say you cloned the drive, did you clone the entire laptop hard disk? It sounds like the external drive is missing a boot partition; that's probably why the laptop won't boot from it.



#3 jcmack

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 02:42 PM

I thought I'd cloned the entire laptop drive as thats what I wanted to do. If the external drive is missing the boot partition can it be restored?

 

 

Thankyou, Jim


Edited by hamluis, 24 January 2017 - 08:38 AM.


#4 jcmack

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 02:06 PM

I finally gave up and did a from scratch load of WIN7. Fortunately I have other PC's to use. The laptop is applying 206 updates now. I use Office 7 so there's another 10 million updates for  it.



#5 dc3

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 02:19 PM

The partition sflatechguy was referring to is the System Reserved partition, this  holds the Boot Manager code and the Boot Configuration Database.  This partition is separate from the partition containing the Windows operating system.  You need to include this in the clone.


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#6 jcmack

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 02:34 PM

I used AOMEI in Aug '16  to clone the drive originally. Since then I've used AOMEI to backup and restore PC's several times. But I used the standard process and used .img files. The  AOMEI clone  process was new to me and  I obviously screwed up.



#7 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 03:45 AM

I used AOMEI in Aug '16  to clone the drive originally. Since then I've used AOMEI to backup and restore PC's several times. But I used the standard process and used .img files. The  AOMEI clone  process was new to me and  I obviously screwed up.

I've never heard of this software and that might be the problem.  Most people reflexively say "Acronis" when someone says "clone", but I say "XXClone" because it's idiot proof.  Easeus is also a good software.  Pretty sure XXClone is freeware.  I'll give you a dab of knowledge that might help you along your way.

 

There are two kinds of cloning.  "Physical" cloning which is byte-for-byte and sector-for-sector, which requires you to have the new (Target) partition sized exactly the same as the Original, meaning if you are cloning a 500Gbyte HD, you need (exactly) a 500Gbyte partition on your Target.  It doesn't have to be a 500 Gbyte drive, example it could be a 1 Tbyte drive, but the Target partition has to be exactly the same size as the original.

 

In contrast, XXClone does "Logical" cloning which ignores physical differences between the Original and Target media, and instead all the relationships between the cloned data is relative to itself, and not the physical characteristics of the hard drive it's being copied to.  Meaning that, you can clone a 500 Gbyte HD to a 2 TByte HD and gain an extra 1.5 Tbytes of free space.  Logical Cloning was used back in the day when you ran out of free space and wanted to upgrade the HD without having to reinstall the Operating System.

 

XXClone gives you a clickie button if you want/don't want to copy the boot sector data from the Original.  (The answer is always "Yes" to this.  There's no reason to NOT make your cloned drive bootable.)  The clones are so good that they give you a default Yes option to change the desktop background to the XXClone logo, because if you boot your system with the Original and the Clone both installed, you won't know which one you actually booted to, as they are EXACTLY alike.  So they change the desktop picture on the clone, so you know for a fact you've booted to the clone and not the original.

 

My experience is dated and almost exclusively with desktop machines, so current laptop technology might throw some curveballs into the process.  Again back in the day you'd put both hard drives inside the desktop and boot to the original, run XXClone, then reboot to the clone using the BIOS to switch boot order from where the original HD was to where the clone HD is.  Getting this to "go" on a laptop with a single HD and a external drive enclosure might be problematic.

 

Another option to consider is to image your HD to a thumbdrive, so that your data is a single, standalone (example) .ISO file.  I've not done this, but what I HAVE done is converted Windows Installation Disks to .ISO files and then used a program called "Rufus" to make a bootable USB drive.  You stick the thing into the USB port, set BIOS to boot from USB 1st, and the thumbdrive will boot you to Windows, or Linux, or Hirens, or whatever.  If you do some digging, you might find a method online for converting your newly-installed Operating System to either a mountable .ISO file (MagicISO) or a bootable USB thumb drive.  I like the thumbdrives for long-term data storage, as long as you pull them off the system and store them inside something, like a shoebox or whatever.  I've never lost data "spontaneously" on a USB drive, but I've lost 3 drives due to them getting caught on a pants leg or something else because they were sticking WAY out of the computer and just waiting to catch on something fold-over and "CRACK".



#8 jcmack

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 08:25 AM

First, thanks to all for responses and special thanks to Aaron for the explanation. I need all the help I can get. In the past I've always worked with desktops. Since drives are relatively inexpensive my philosophy has been to  clone my primary drive to a second drive in the same case, both drives being the same size. Then I disconnect the second drive until the next backup. Occasionally I boot the cloned drive just to make sure the process is still effective.

AOMEI was recommended on this site and I've used it for about a year. It has worked fine and I've restored desktop HD's several times. I used a second 500g drive to clone my laptops 500g drive even used a 2.5 drive. Either I missed something in the process or there's something else to take into consideration when trying to clone to an external laptop drive.

My laptop is something I don't use much but I want it operational, and I can't warm up to WIN10 (although I backed it up in case things change)

 

Thanks again, Jim



#9 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 03:29 PM

AOMEI was recommended on this site and I've used it for about a year. It has worked fine and I've restored desktop HD's several times. I used a second 500g drive to clone my laptops 500g drive even used a 2.5 drive. Either I missed something in the process or there's something else to take into consideration when trying to clone to an external laptop drive.

My laptop is something I don't use much but I want it operational, and I can't warm up to WIN10 (although I backed it up in case things change)

 

Thanks again, Jim

 

Seems odd you are backup up and restoring drives.  I'd go find whoever it was that recommended "AOMEI" and find out from them what went wrong.  I'm assuming the data that you lost was not important.  I hate Win10 also.  There's a very long list of things about it that I find completely unacceptable and what makes it worse is the hoards of retards that enthusiastically endorse the product without having a clue about what it's doing, what it's not doing, etc... Example the fundamental change is not technical, it's legal.  In the past you were given a "license to use" the Operating Software which meant that your data was your data, their data was their data, with the exceptions of what you were licensed to use, meaning that the "use" of the data was to a certain extent "yours" as long as it was within the terms of the license agreement.

 

That's all changed.  Those days are gone.  Things are different now.  Really, really different, and in the worst way possible.  And most of these retards don't even know it.  Yet they speak with such authority online about technical quality "A", and aesthetic quality "B" and when you tell the truth of it, which is that they are completely ignorant, talking out of their sphincters and in the most retarded and offensive manner possible, suddenly the person that tells the truth of it is the problem.  Example what if everyone around you were extolling the virtues of Meth?  Meth is good, meth gives you "pep", meth is best when it's smoked, but injecting it is good to. The packaging of meth is pretty and the cost is really low now.  You can buy meth everywhere and the people that sell it are wonderful.

 

That results in rage.  And rage against Win10 is bad, as so are the people that have it.  So I try to restrain it.  You can't stop the retarded from doing what they are determined to do.  Ever.

 

The "New Way" with Microsoft, and with Win10, is that you no longer have a "License to Use", Microsoft is providing you the SERVICE of an operating system.  "Software as a Service" is the NEW way.  Which means a lot of really important things have changed in a very profound way.  Example it's not your data, it's Microsoft's data.  That's not your computer, that's Microsoft's terminal.  Instead of MS giving you a license to use their software, the new EULA means you give MS permission (and not a license) to use your computer, in order to deliver the service of the operating system to you.  It's their computer now.  It's their data.  Even your original content is "theirs".  A parallel to this is when Facebook started using their User's personal photos in order to advertise products and services.  Yes that really happened.  Imagine they take your grand daughter's birthday picture and use it in an advertisement for a local Day Care.  Yes that happened.  No they don't pay you.  Anything.  You gave FB permission to use your data when you uploaded your data to their Servers.  It became their data.

 

Same thing with MS.  Same principal.  So, when you dump your photos from your Android to their computer, those photos are their photos now.

 

They can scan your Win10 machine for "Potentially Unwanted Programs" which can be defined as a cracked version of "Call of Duty".  They can copy ever bit of data from your computer, store it on their "cloud" (which is really a P2P filesharing network of other Win10 users, all over the world), wipe your HD completely, reinstall Win10 (maybe because you cracked it's copyright protection schemes) and then re-import "your data" back onto their computer, with a fresh install of Win10.  Yes that's real.  Yes I can prove it.  Anyone wants a link to the forum where Win10 has been deconstructed and analyzed, send me a PM.






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