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Upgrading a 10 Year Old Computer


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#1 AdvancedAperture

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 04:08 PM

Hey guys, so I'm helping my friend upgrade their custom PC that was built in 2006 but I don't know how to approach this. I think I can reuse the case and the hard drives but would that be the best option? I feel I should just buy all new parts including a case and drives and simply just copy the information over from the old computer. I would love to hear your suggestions!

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#2 Drillingmachine

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 04:11 PM

Current parts are?



#3 hamluis

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 04:20 PM

FWIW:  If you plan on using the same Windows install and hard drive...in the new system, I would forget about that.  The license for Windows and the drivers/settings for the old system...will not necessarily allow such.  A change of motherboard is considered a change of system.

 

Data files are the only files which can be simply copied and expected to be transferable.

 

Louis



#4 AdvancedAperture

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 04:21 PM

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Asus A8N32-SLI Deluxe Socket 939 Nvidia nForce SPP 100 ATX AMD Motherboard
eVGA 256-P2-N553 AX GeForce 7600GT 256MB GDDR3 PCI x16
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#5 Planemaster2

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 04:42 PM

It looks like quite an old socket type (Socket 939 which was release in 2004 I believe). A brand new PC would be the best choice in my opinion.



#6 hamluis

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:13 PM

FWIW:  Chances are...for the amount of money that would ostensibly be dumped into that system...your friend might consider simply buying a refurbished system (would have newer parts and be in decent working order, and have Windows installed..

 

Examples 1.

 

Examples 2.

 

Louis



#7 AdvancedAperture

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:22 PM

FWIW:  Chances are...for the amount of money that would ostensibly be dumped into that system...your friend might consider simply buying a refurbished system (would have newer parts and be in decent working order, and have Windows installed..
 
Examples 1.
 
Examples 2.
 
Louis


Thank you for the suggestion, I was thinking the same, either get a used system or to build her a completely new one. She was just curious if she could save the case and reuse the hard drives.

#8 AdvancedAperture

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:24 PM

It looks like quite an old socket type (Socket 939 which was release in 2004 I believe). A brand new PC would be the best choice in my opinion.


Yeah, I was going to replace the motherboard and other components. My friend was just wondering if any of the old parts are salvageable.

#9 Mike_Walsh

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 07:06 PM

TBH, it all depends on what you want to do with it.

 

Nowt wrong with Socket 939; it's still perfectly viable as an everyday processor. That's the exact same CPU as I run myself, as an upgrade from a single-core 3200+. I run a kennel-full of 'Puppy' Linux distros.....and Pup absolutely screams on it. My system is an elderly Compaq desktop from 2004/5, and everything still works perfectly Mind you, a lot of upgrading has gone into the system, but that's only to be expected. New HDD and SSD; new PSU, in addition to the CPU upgrade.....and the RAM's all been renewed in recent months.  Plus a USB 3.0 adapter card in the PCI-e slot, since I don't bother with a discrete GPU; got no need for one.

 

Sure, if you're a gamer, then yes, you'd be wasting your time trying to do anything with it. But then, 'gaming' is not the 'be-all & the end-all' to life..!  :P

 

Linux (and Puppy in particular) is far more lightweight on system requirements than Windows is, trust me. Just about any app you can think of is available, somewhere on the Puppy Forum.....and those that aren't, you can run Windows progs in WINE. About the only thing it won't do very well is run VirtualBox and the like.....but then the CPU instruction set doesn't include virtualization! 

 

It's still a perfectly viable system; don't chuck it away. I agree, it's not a lot of good for current Windows, but it can easily be re-purposed as a Linux box. No need to add to the world's landfill problems..! And if she's used to Windows, then Puppy will seem very familiar...

 

in retrospect, actually, Linux Mint might be a better choice for your friend; very user friendly these days. Almost identical to Win XP in layout.....which is what a machine of that age would have come with, or had installed. Most Socket 939 mobos from that era would permit upgrading to a max of 4 GB DDR1 RAM. Even just another GB would allow running Mint with no problems....and DDR1 (when you can find it) is as cheap as chips, these days. Nobody wants it anymore. (*Bonus!*)

 

Just my tuppence-worth.

 

 

Mike.  :wink:


Edited by Mike_Walsh, 20 January 2017 - 08:15 PM.

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#10 hamluis

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 07:39 PM

To be honest...I would not place any confidence in a hard drive which was manufactured back circa 2006.  While all the other components don't have documented problems because of age...hard drives made 10 years or so ago are not likely to be as reliable, IMO.    A typical hard drive made then was under warranty for a max of 3 years...to get 3 times that usage out of one...is good fortune but certainly not to be expected, IMO.

 

Cases can be used from now to eternity...unless they are OEM cases employed by OEM system manufacturers.  I suppose that a new case is likely to be "better" than an older case but...beauty IS in the eye of the beholder.

 

I don't know anything about linux...but Mike seems to have some other valid points that users today should alwasy consider.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 20 January 2017 - 07:41 PM.


#11 Zone_86

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 12:34 PM

Going forward it would help to know what she plans on using the computer for. The previous build was somewhat of a gaming oriented build especially with the SLI capable mainboard and it was also using a 7600GT, and although older parts they were gaming oriented parts for that era. If you can get intended usage info we can better offer more refurb type units, or bare-bones kits, or even a simple new custom build. I do agree with the sentiments of the above gentlemen about possibly not getting rid of the system, but not everyone reuses, or cares to tasks systems for Linux usage, or Linux learning (as it were). I have a few older systems using Linux but the majority of my customers could care less about Linux, but it is a very cool alternative, or augmentation to consider even if you wish or intend to build out a new computer system or buy a refurb.



#12 AdvancedAperture

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 03:19 PM

Going forward it would help to know what she plans on using the computer for. The previous build was somewhat of a gaming oriented build especially with the SLI capable mainboard and it was also using a 7600GT, and although older parts they were gaming oriented parts for that era. If you can get intended usage info we can better offer more refurb type units, or bare-bones kits, or even a simple new custom build. I do agree with the sentiments of the above gentlemen about possibly not getting rid of the system, but not everyone reuses, or cares to tasks systems for Linux usage, or Linux learning (as it were). I have a few older systems using Linux but the majority of my customers could care less about Linux, but it is a very cool alternative, or augmentation to consider even if you wish or intend to build out a new computer system or buy a refurb.

My apologies, my friend wanted a PC that will last for a long time because she only upgrades every 10 years or so. She doesn't game on the computer, she mostly downloads lots of media. Even though Linux is a good free alternative she wants Windows 10. Her budget is around $1,000. Thank you for the information.



#13 hamluis

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 03:45 PM

There are a gazillion systems that would meet those very basic needs/wants of a user...and most of them are far less than $1,000.

 

You posted about "upgrading" a 10-year-old system...and it seems that you really should just do a little research and buy a new computer.  I would suggest that you/your friend take look at the a site like Amazon...decide whether you want a desktop or a laptop...and then do some filtering by price on the website.

 

Or...if you insist it building/assembling...then I suggest the most basic new case, new motherboard, new RAM, new hard drive.  You might also tell your friend that a 10-year life is not necessarily to be expected for any system...not necessarily because the components will fial but the fact that the technology employed within the components will make today's technology...less deisreable.

 

Just as the technology around in 2006 is today deemed worthy of replacement by your friend.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 22 January 2017 - 03:50 PM.





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