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Office 2016 Pro Plus Problems


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#1 blarg2

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 01:00 PM

Hey Guys,

I have Windows 10 Pro, freshly installed. I was having problems with Excel and OneNote launching so I used the repair tool given by Microsoft to no avail. I then used the removal tool and reinstalled and it no longer shows up in my start menu. I then manually uninstalled it by going through the Microsoft support steps which took a good 30 minutes. Restarted my machine and reinstalled to find again that it would install, but it doesn't show up in the start menu, and when I go to program files and try to start it manually it give me the something went wrong error, saying we couldn't start your program please try again. At this point I am honestly not sure what to do. 

Machine specs

Phenom II 955

8 GB RAM

RX 480 with newest drivers

 



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 01:33 PM

Were I you, I would actually try contacting Microsoft Customer Support on this issue, particularly if you have a brand new copy of Office 2016 that should still have some support time as part of the purchase.

 

It sounds like you've tried all of the logical initial steps, and the result you have screams that there's some sort of registry mess-up related to the Office 2016 installation that derives from its own install/uninstall scripts.

 

If you do go this route, please report back on what ends up being done by Microsoft.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#3 MoxieMomma

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 02:11 PM

Hi:

 

I agree with the above suggestions.

 

Also:

  1. Is your Windows10 properly activated with MS and fully patched?
  2. Was it an upgrade from 7/8.1 or a clean install with Win10?
  3. Is your Office 2016 Pro Plus properly activated with MS?
  4. Have you done any routine diagnostics/repair on your Win10 install, such as System File Checker and/or DISM?

I had no trouble installing MS Office 2016 Pro Plus on an OEM Win10 Pro system several months ago.

So, something might be amiss with Office, with Windows, or with both?

 

Yes, please do report back with your results, so that we can all learn.

 

Thanks,

MM



#4 blarg2

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 02:21 PM

Windows is a clean install and yes everything is activated. I will try contacting Microsoft. 



#5 rarson

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 03:18 PM

If you do try to contact Microsoft, be sure of who you are talking to and be very leery about letting them take control of the computer.

 

I have dealt with lots of Office issues in the past, they can be very tricky to fix. It is odd that you would encounter problems on a fresh load, so I would suspect a hardware issue.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 05:02 PM

I'll have to disagree with rarson's proviso, "be very leery about letting them take control of the computer."

 

With issues such as this one I can guarantee you that they will want to take control of the computer, as it's virtually impossible to do the "under the hood" examinations necessary without doing so (unless you have an incredibly technology proficient user, which you usually do not).

 

If you've initiated a call to Microsoft Technical Support, or the technical support of any legitimate company, you are essentially ending the support for that issue if they ask to be able to poke around the computer to have a look-see and you refuse.  That's perfectly reasonable.  I couldn't do work on people's computers if the reaction when I sat down to start doing so was, "No, you tell me what to do and I'll do it," when the problems are most often complex, ill defined by the end user, and can lead in all sorts of different directions depending on what is found at each step of the way.   Were someone to actually do that I'd tell them, immediately and in no uncertain terms, that they need to find someone else to fix their computer.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#7 rarson

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 05:46 PM

I didn't mean to insinuate not to let Microsoft actually try to fix something, I meant to insinuate to be absolutely sure who you're talking to before you decide to just let some random person with an Indian accent who claims to work for Microsoft onto the computer and have them tell you that your computer has tons of viruses on it. I get calls all the time from people who go to Google and find an 800 scam number and now they can't get back onto their computer because it has a syskey password on it, or any number of other outcomes. My favorite is Yahoo customer support, because the Yahoo customer support phone number does not exist (by the way, their account recovery process doesn't work either, so if you have Yahoo email, you better make sure your recovery information is correct, because if it's not and you don't remember your password, you're never getting back into that account).

 

I'd highly recommend taking it to a reputable local shop before EVER calling anyone on the phone, but that's just me. My customers aren't capable of knowing whether the people they're talking to are who they say they are.



#8 britechguy

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 09:59 PM

Sorry Gentlemen, this is a test since I can't seem to get the actual content to post.  Let's see if this does.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#9 britechguy

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 10:33 PM

rarson,
 
          I can't disagree with any of the precautions you encourage.
 
          That being said, Microsoft's customer support numbers are very easy to obtain via their "Contact Us" buttons/links under the product support website for the specific product in question (support.office.com in this case).  They're also generally printed on the install media (if you have it) or the license key covers.
 
          I counsel my clients that they should never, and I emphasize never, believe anyone who calls them, unbidden, and wants remote access to their machine.  I further emphasize that no legitimate company would ever do this.  I then follow-up with this is not the same thing, at all, as a technical support representative calling you back on an issue you've reported, and for which you've been given a case/incident number, and where they identify themselves as being from the company you've previously called and can give you the incident number without your ever giving it to them.
 
           I try to teach complete neophytes how to critically evaluate information that they find on the internet and that when it comes to technical support phone numbers if they're not from the website of the maker of whatever it is you're concerned about then they're not a number you call - ever.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#10 opera

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 01:45 AM

Does Office 2016 Pro Plus still install the 32 bit version by default unless you specify otherwise?



#11 MoxieMomma

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 02:03 AM

Hi:

 

Does Office 2016 Pro Plus still install the 32 bit version by default unless you specify otherwise?

 

I'm in academia.

We get our license from the university and the software is distributed via an academic software distributor via download (not physical media).

I went back through my notes and it looks as though the 64-bit and 32-bit versions were provided via different d/l links.

So, the user must choose "up front" which version to d/l and install.

 

IIRC when I last installed from media (Office 2010 a few years ago), I think there was an option early in the setup wizard to choose 32-bit or 64-bit.

I have always installed the 32-bit version, even on my 64-bit systems.

It is perfectly fine for my needs and (as far as I am told), less troublesome than the 64-bit version.

 

Someone will correct me, if I am wrong.

 

MM



#12 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 06:51 AM

I have an Academic version of Office 2016 Professional, and yes the 32 bit version is the default version that loads.


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#13 rarson

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 12:09 PM

 

rarson,
 
          I can't disagree with any of the precautions you encourage.
 
          That being said, Microsoft's customer support numbers are very easy to obtain via their "Contact Us" buttons/links under the product support website for the specific product in question (support.office.com in this case).  They're also generally printed on the install media (if you have it) or the license key covers.
 
          I counsel my clients that they should never, and I emphasize never, believe anyone who calls them, unbidden, and wants remote access to their machine.  I further emphasize that no legitimate company would ever do this.  I then follow-up with this is not the same thing, at all, as a technical support representative calling you back on an issue you've reported, and for which you've been given a case/incident number, and where they identify themselves as being from the company you've previously called and can give you the incident number without your ever giving it to them.
 
           I try to teach complete neophytes how to critically evaluate information that they find on the internet and that when it comes to technical support phone numbers if they're not from the website of the maker of whatever it is you're concerned about then they're not a number you call - ever.

 

 

I get all that, and I totally agree. It's possible you're working with slightly above-average computer users, or I'm working with below-average (although in my experience, they tend to be the majority). For instance, "I counsel my clients that they should never, and I emphasize never, believe anyone who calls them, unbidden, and wants remote access to their machine." Yup, me too. And they sit there and say "But they opened up (Event Viewer) and showed me all the errors that my computer had and claimed that my machine was sending out viruses and that they were from Microsoft..." And I tell them "They are scamming you. Everything they said was a lie to get you to give them money." And they say "But they said I had such and such problem with my computer..." And oftentimes, these are the same people who have already fallen for the scam one or more times, and we've already had this conversation, and they still want to talk about what the scammer told them.

 

Also, a huge problem that my customers have is locating phone numbers. Most of them get to every single web page they go to via Google. For instance, I watched someone go to AOL. They opened up their browser (which defaulted to Google) and typed in "www.aol.com." If I tell my customer to enter something into the address bar, in order to get to a specific web site, I have to ask them what exactly is on the page that they're now looking at, because even after describing precisely where the bar is, they still end up typing into the Google search. They have no hope of finding a legitimate Microsoft phone number. And yet when they run into a problem, instead of calling me, they call some random 800 number and let people onto their computer.

 

I apologize for the off-topic discussion, I just wanted to better explain what I said and why. I appreciate the discussion. It's very important to try to create educated users, which is why I hate it when Microsoft tries to hide important things like file extensions from their users by default, because all it does is foster ignorance. My customers tend to skew towards the older generation and their mentality is often "I'm too old to figure out how to use a computer" which is maddening to me, because what they are telling me is that I'm wasting my time explaining things to them because they're not even attempting to listen.






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