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Windows 10 to ?


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#1 boilermaker27

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 12:56 PM

I used the free upgrade to Windows 10 and have been sorry ever since I did that.  I now am considering doing a system recovery on  my computer back to the Windows 7, and realize that I will lost everything but that is alright if I can get rid of 10, as that seems to be the only way I can accomplish that.  There is not much I like about Windows 10 and I find it harder to use than Windows 7.  Now my question is operating system?  I have never used Linux or Unix and know nothing about either operating system, I have done some reading on both, but that is not very helpful.  My main concern is just what can be run on Linux and what can't be run?  I am not much of a gamer so that is really no problem, all games that I play come fron Windows, however I have lot's of programs on CD which I would still like to use and don't know if these will work on Linux? 

 

I know I can install both Windows and Linux and jump between the two.  My computer has enough hard drive to run both so that is no problem.  If I should decide to try Linux or Unix I have found that there are different versions and that is also confusing, confusing as to which version to download.  Should I download one of the versions and decide to keep Windows I am leaning to doing the complete system recovery, knowing that I will need to delete a lot of junk that came with the computer, then sit through hours of updates, but my question is keep Windows 10 and use it alongside Linux, or do the system recovery back to Windows 7 and use it along with Linux?

 



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#2 pcpunk

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 01:23 PM

I now am considering doing a system recovery on  my computer back to the Windows 7

This part you may need to post in the W7 Section before you can proceed here.  We can get you going with a "distro" (Linux talk for an Operating System) that you can run as a "Linux Live Session" to see if you like it, from your current setup, without bothering anything.  First thing would be to see some Specs.  The easiest way would be to post your Model#, or if you already know just post it up, but make sure it is correct.  CPU, RAM, HDD etc.

 

If it were me, I would Clean Install W7 from a Retail Version Disk, After you get all your personal files from the computer.  Because now you have multiple partitions that may prevent (almost certainly prevent) Installing Linux in a dual boot scenario, including the Windows 10 partitions.  You say you don't want windows 10, so I would get rid of all it while you can.

 

If you want to post a comprehensive snapshot of your system use this tutorial.  If it is to difficult then just post up the Specs and the Exact Model#.  Depending on what type of pc it is, if you RE-install from a Recovery Partition or Recovery Disks, it may still prevent installing linux as Dual Boot, we need to know before you proceed.  Some pc manufacturers include Recovery Partitions, and these partitions prevent a dual boot with linux, that is why I mention "Retail" Version Disk of Windows 7 to do the install.

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/323892/publish-a-snapshot-using-speccy/#entry1797792 


Edited by pcpunk, 16 January 2017 - 04:56 PM.

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#3 boilermaker27

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 02:05 PM

http://speccy.piriform.com/results/NqJ1KuejgE7NXTByAujsDcT



#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 02:43 PM

Well I am sure a linux system will work on this no prob.

Just dont expect a touchscreen experience as linux developers are still working on that


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#5 Angoid

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 03:45 PM

There is always going to be a learning curve when migrating from Windows to Linux, so dual-booting is a good compromise to begin with as anything you run on Windows for which there is no Linux equivalent can still be run from your Windows environment.

 

For me, I plumped for Ubuntu: it has a nice interface and the experience is generally quite enjoyable.

Debian is also worth a look.

 

Almost all Linux distros can be run from a live CD as has already been pointed out, so burn yourself an ISO for the distros you like the look of and see what you think!  They are non-destructive live CDs / DVDs, run entirely from the optical disk and from RAM.  Can take time to boot up, but try not to let that [put you off.  Think of it as being a kind of "try-before-you-buy" scenario (although only Red Hat Linux costs any money).


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#6 MadmanRB

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 06:01 PM

Well as far as learning curves go linux is far easier to learn and adapt to then it has ever been.

As long as you dont jump right into arch, gentoo, slackware, debian pure and other commandline/more advanced distros you will be fine :D


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#7 pcpunk

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 06:19 PM

For now you cannot dual boot without extensive partition manipulation.  If you like you can run a "Linux Live Session" to see if you like it, and if your system supports it easily, which it should.  Linux likes Intel Hardware, so this pc should run it quite smoothly.  You can do this two ways, from a USB or a DVD, I highly suggest to use a USB, it will be faster/smoother.  A small inexpensive 2.0 usb is fine.  The DVD will run fine but slower.  After you get the medium created you can just boot from it by changing the Boot Order in BIOS.

 

1. Download the USB Installer if you don't already have one.  Make sure you have an Empty USB to use and follow the steps at this site.

(For DVD use your favorite DVD Image Burner instead, Remember, your not Copying files, your Burning an Image)

 

2. Download the Linux Mint iso.  You can also choose to download via the UUI Installer, but that only let's you download the older version of Linux.  We may use the older later if the Newest Version don't work well for some reason.

 

Here is the link to our favorite Linux Mint distro for computers like yours.  Choose the "Mirror" closest to you and download.

https://www.linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=226

You should always Verify if the download went well, if you need help ask.  We always Verify the "Checksum" to make sure we get a good download.  Here is the "Checksum" for that one:  b99f4b98a1b41737ded072dc1a7060ca32224e23236074790d4fc86b51009e3c

 

3. Steps after Download of iso. 

#1>Open UUI and Run it, Select Linux Mint from the Dropdown.

#2>Use "Browse" Button to Browse to the downloaded iso.

#3>Choose the USB Drive (It may be chosen by Default if it is the only one in computer)>You can choose to Format the Drive also if you are sure you have the right one, and there is nothing on it you need.  Again, make sure it is Empty!

#4>Don't bother with this step.  Choose "Create" to Make the Live USB, and let it finish like it shows at the site.


Edited by pcpunk, 17 January 2017 - 02:48 PM.

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#8 wizardfromoz

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 07:03 PM

Hi boilermaker27 and :welcome: to the Linux & Unix Section, hope you enjoy your stay here.

 

I would basically endorse any and all of the above.

 

I note from your Speccy output that you have at least one Sandisk Cruzer USB stick. If, as described above, you have an empty one, that is a better vehicle than CD/DVD for burning an .iso to, with regard to speed and reusability. It will still be slower than a full install, but give you a good picture of what Linux is like.

 

A Linux Mint, or an Ubuntu 16.04 MATE (IMO) is an excellent starting point, coming from a Windows environment.

 

With the size of your Seagate drive, you have all the space you will ever need.

 

Enjoy

 

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#9 wizardfromoz

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 07:22 PM

BTW if you want to try something that allows you a choice to have a real Windows feel about it, you could try Zorin.

 

Screenshot below is of my Zorin OS 11, which is based on Ubuntu's 15.10 'Wily Werewolf' ( for which support ceased last July) but the new one out, Zorin OS 12, is based on Ubuntu 16.04 'Xenial Xerus', it is LTS (long term support) and has support until April 2021. I will be upgrading shortly, to it, but I run a lot of Distros (50 or so), lol.

 

 

uIgAMOw.png

 

 

Just something more to confuse you, lol. Ask any questions if you are unsure, and we will endeavour to answer.

 

Cheers all

 

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#10 Gary R

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 01:14 AM

If you want to boot to an alternate OS located on a DVD or USB, you'll need to change your BIOS/UEFI boot order, so that it prioritises DVD and/or USB over your hard drive.

 

If you don't know how to do that, let us know and someone will talk you through it.  It may sound hard, but it really isn't.


Edited by Gary R, 17 January 2017 - 01:18 AM.


#11 NickAu

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 01:23 AM

 

 however I have lot's of programs on CD which I would still like to use and don't know if these will work on Linux?

In short No you cant install Windows software on Linux..  There are ways of doing it but I wont get into it because it gets complicated and quite often don't work.

 

You will find that there are usually open source versions of most software in the Linux repos.

 

What type of software.


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#12 boilermaker27

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 04:07 PM

PCPunk stated that I cannot dual boot without extensive partition manipulation and I don't want to get rid of my Windows 7 partition so I am thinking to be on the safe side maybe I should just stick with Windows 7?



#13 MadmanRB

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 04:15 PM

No you can dual boot just do a backup to preserve your data

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#14 pcpunk

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 07:22 PM

PCPunk stated that I cannot dual boot without extensive partition manipulation and I don't want to get rid of my Windows 7 partition so I am thinking to be on the safe side maybe I should just stick with Windows 7?

You can still run the "Linux Live USB" or DVD if you like.  You just boot from it to take it for a Test Drive, and when your done, your done, all your Windows stuff is fine, as long as you don't muck about in Windows Partitions Folders and Files.  

 

In the future, if you are able to remove some of those Partitions when and if you remove Windows 10 then you will be able to Dual Boot with Linux, but I'm not sure.  I don't fully understand how W10 Installs over W7.  W7 may have already had 4 Primary Partitions before the W10 Upgrade, and therefore cannot create another.  The MBR type of Partitioning has a limit of Four Primary Partitions, and therefore cannot accept any more whether Linux or other.

 

Maybe a long shot, but you can Check to see if you have GPT Partitioning.  In this case you would be able to install Linux in a Dual Boot as it is now.  With GPT you can have many partitions, but generally speaking, Windows 7 is installed with MBR.

http://www.howtogeek.com/193669/whats-the-difference-between-gpt-and-mbr-when-partitioning-a-drive/

 

You can also do an External Install to a USB or an External Powered Drive, but this stuff is risky for the inexperienced, and I'm in the same boat.  I would be careful with my W7 Install, it takes like 5hrs to re-install and setup Windows 7 for me.

 

Maybe you can find a Free Handmedown computer to play around with linux, I have...um...to many as it is now lol.  If you are close to me maybe I could help you out with one but I'm not in the position to ship anything.  Go to a computer repair shop and see if they will help you out with a really cheap used pc.  Old windows xp pc's will even work, and ususally shops have these laying around.


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#15 NickAu

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 07:31 PM

Hi

 

 

I now am considering doing a system recovery on  my computer back to the Windows 7

 

Restore or reinstall your Windows 7 set it up then post back here and I will guide you on how to dual boot it with Linux if you still want. Its not hard.

 

@ PcPunk please stop complicating the issue.


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