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Am I still safe even though Chrome blocked website claiming it was phishing


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#1 eca765

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 02:36 PM

Outlook did not mark it as spam, I thought it was a genuine amazon email, it looked authentic. The email said I ordered something from a marketplace seller(I did not!). So i clicked on the link that says "get help". I got redirected to the page Chrome blocked, would I still be infected with malware ? Chrome uses google websafe that black list websites that are malicious. All security updates were updated already. Chrome was also up to date. As soon it had happened I used avast scanned for an hour nothing came up. Malwarebytes same result. I was on Incognito Mode as well. Afterwards I changed my passwords.

 

So I am curious about whether I could get a virus or malware by clicking a link. I read somewhere there you could get malware without any interaction like a script being activated, or malware downloaded without noticing it, not like an attachment that contains macros. 

 

I know this is probably just phishing scam just to get my details, but I am still scared.



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#2 shadow_647

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 03:36 PM

I think your safe, internet site was blocked.

Chances are if the site wasn't blocked next thing buddy's would have tried to do is a drive by download or social engineering attack of some kind, but i think your good.



#3 robby501

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 06:44 PM

So you got the red page with the 'X' on it telling you that Chrome had blocked the page..possibly saying something like "Deceptive site ahead" and then giving you the option to 'return/back to safety'? 

Well provided you did as instructed and 'returned to safety', then 99.9% sure that you are safe.

However, if you are still concerned, you could perform scans with either Malwarebytes (free edition), HitmanPro or Zemana (my personal fave!) anti-malware scanners; all of which are free to use and available to download safely within the Downloads forum of this website.


Edited by robby501, 18 January 2017 - 06:49 PM.

Im a rookie and purely recreational pc user. Im utterly obsessed with security (even though I consider myself a safe and law-abiding internet user!) and run a combo of the following freeware security suites.....

Windows Defender/firewall

Regular scans with Malwarebytes, AdwCleaner, JRT, HitmanPro

 

 

 


#4 quietman7

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 07:39 PM

The developers of Nemucod, CryptoWall, Locky, Ransom32, TeslaCrypt, KeyBTC, XRTN and other types of ransomware all have been known to use malicious .js (JScript) files often found in zipped email attachments disguised as fake PDF files which appear to be legitimate correspondence from reputable companies such as financial institutions, FedEx and UPS notices with tracking numbers. Attackers will use email addresses and subjects (purchase orders, bills, complaints, other business communications) that will entice a user to read the email and open the attachment. Another method involves tricking unwitting users into opening Order Confirmation emails by asking them to confirm an online e-commerce order, purchase or package shipment.If you did the wrong thing, you'd probably know about it already as there would be obvious indications (signs of infection).
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#5 eca765

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 03:05 PM

Thanks for replying, I read the articles. I am probably safe, but I will be more careful next time.



#6 Didier Stevens

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 03:15 PM

When you clicked on the link, Google Chrome blocked the page. This means that the HTTP request was not sent to the server and because of that there could not be a reply from the server, and thus you are safe.


Edited by Didier Stevens, 22 January 2017 - 03:15 PM.

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#7 quietman7

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Posted 26 January 2017 - 05:26 AM

You're welcome on behalf of the Bleeping Computer community.
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