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Router acting as a device


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#1 kohtsrjm

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 09:01 AM

At my institute, the administration has a 5 Mbps speed cap per user. Each user needs to enter his/her credentials (username and password) before he can access the internet. I have bought a TP-LINK 150 Mbps Wireless N Router (TL-WR720N) recently. When I connect 3 devices to that router and enters my login credential at any one connected device (out of 3), the login credentials are not required in the other 2 devices and the speed (5mbps per user) gets divided into 3 devices. This does not happen in case of other routers. How can I configure the router so that the login page appears on each of the connected devices and the speed is not divided?  



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#2 Trikein

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 02:43 PM

This is by design. When you connect to the network, and sign in, you are attaching those credentials to the MAC address of the device signing in. Usually its the MAC address of your wireless adapter, but if you are connecting with router, its to the MAC address of that router. So the bandwidth only gets assigned to the router as a singular device. Also, if you check the terms of service you are signing into, I would think it would not allow routers to be connected. Basically what your doing is trying to get around the bandwidth cap, even if not on purpose. To be sure, I would suggest contacting your institutes IT department.


Edited by Trikein, 13 January 2017 - 02:43 PM.


#3 kohtsrjm

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 01:34 AM

This is by design. When you connect to the network, and sign in, you are attaching those credentials to the MAC address of the device signing in. Usually its the MAC address of your wireless adapter, but if you are connecting with router, its to the MAC address of that router. So the bandwidth only gets assigned to the router as a singular device. Also, if you check the terms of service you are signing into, I would think it would not allow routers to be connected. Basically what your doing is trying to get around the bandwidth cap, even if not on purpose. To be sure, I would suggest contacting your institutes IT department.

I have another router ( Quite an old one) and if i connect to it you get login page on each device and hence the speed is not at all divided ( after i enter my credential on each of the connected device). Thus, the older router acts as a switch and the new router acts as a router. Why? ( one user can connect 3 devices at a time as per the rule i.e. 3 logins on 3 devices for a total speed of 15 Mbps as per the rules)


Edited by kohtsrjm, 14 January 2017 - 01:39 AM.


#4 Trikein

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 01:46 AM

Because the older device must not have been a router, but a wireless switch or AP. Think of it like the difference between a wired switch and router. A router will assigns private IP address to any device connected to it, with the MAC address assigned to the public WAN IP. A switch can only connect the devices you are connected to it to any DHCP server also connected to it. Try putting your router in AP mode. See here for instructions.



#5 Kilroy

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 01:34 PM

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I'd suggest checking with the institute on how to address this issue.  Though I believe configuring the router as an Access Point (AP) might do the trick.


Edited by Kilroy, 16 January 2017 - 01:35 PM.





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