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Windows 10 updates from the beginning?


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#1 bcmo

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 08:48 AM

If someone buys a new Windows 10 computer now:

1) For proper Windows security, will they need to sit for a few days and install the hundreds of Windows Updates published by Microsoft since the beginning of Windows 10?

2) Will all the hundreds of updates be available in the Windows update center?

 

Thank you.



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#2 Nighthawke1701a

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 09:27 AM

There is a better way that we are using for our clients now: It's called WSUS Offline Update.  Initally it's a small package, but when you launch it, you can pick and choose what distro of windows and office, all the way to 10 and 2016 (even tho office does a pretty good job of taking care of itself). Then it takes about a couple of hours to download it all, bulking out the package to about 2GB for Win7.

 

For Win10, we have yet to run WSUS Offline on, but we have had great luck with Win7 setups. But you need to take your Internet Explorer to version 11 before starting the update process or it will stall out.  There is a switch in there to enable auto restarts so it can pretty much run unattended (it creates a temporary account to do this so take note) until the downloaded updates are all installed.

 

Now it does not download ALL the updates, but it does get you within about 4-5 months on the update calendar. That should get you on your way.

 

For Joe User, let Win10 run 3-4 days straight without shutting it down, but do log off.


Edited by Nighthawke1701a, 12 January 2017 - 09:28 AM.


#3 dc3

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 10:37 AM

Of all of the Windows operating system updates Windows 10 seems to have a priority.  I suspect this is due to the large number of people who took advantage of Microsoft's offer to upgrade to Windows 10 for free.  I upgraded in August and have received five updates since that time and am currently up to date.  Windows 10 updates now come in the form of "Builds", these are large updates, hence the smaller number of updates seen in previously in earlier versions of Windows.  I would suggest using the computer normally and wait for the updates to occur.  


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#4 bcmo

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 06:41 PM

Do all the past updates arrive? Or do they have to be downloaded from Microsoft's site?

Does the Anniversary updates include all the updates before it, or not?


Edited by bcmo, 12 January 2017 - 06:42 PM.


#5 Nighthawke1701a

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Posted 13 January 2017 - 05:50 PM

Do all the past updates arrive? Or do they have to be downloaded from Microsoft's site?

Does the Anniversary updates include all the updates before it, or not?

A little bit of both. All current updates are downloaded, this does include the Anniversary update and subsequent packages.

 

They are modifying the update process to allow opt-outs on drivers, since there are more than a few bad drivers that get posted to windows update.  I don't know when this will take effect, but if it's been announced, then very soon.



#6 x64

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 02:53 AM

The answers above are a little bit confused....

 

The quick answer is that on a new PC, you may get one two to large updates at first and a small number of smaller ones. If you have other MS products installed. they may get numerous updates.

 

The situation is:

 

Windows 10 updates are "cumulative updates". Cumulative updates (CUs) include all of the content of earlier updates for that version of windows. That means that in order to bring "Windows 10" up to date you need to download just the latest update.

 

Easy eh?? OK no... That statement sets the flavour of what happens but It's a bit more complicated than that.

 

As with anything, the devil is in the detail, and above I used the words "Version" and "Windows" to qualify the statement.

 

Let's deal with "version" first...

 

Windows 10 has new versions released relatively frequently (once or twice a year for ordinary users). These new builds are where new features and major changes are introduced. The "Anniversary update" is one of those. These big releases are more correctly known as upgrades and also each one also goes by other names - the Anniversary update has a project name of "Redstone" or "Redstone 1" and a version number of 1607 (released in year 16, month 07). Upgrades are generally large to download, take longer to install, and as mentioned above will introduce functionality changes. Upgrades will contain all the updates that were releases to earlier versions and are relevant to the new version.

The cumulative updates for Windows are based on the Windows 10 VERSION installed and contain all updates since that version was released. These come out frequently - At least one a month, sometimes more frequently. As you can imagine the physical size of a CU increases across the life of a upgrade but only the content needed to install the changes between 'what you had' and 'what is current' are installed when you install a CU.

 

So.... When updates (even on a new PC) are detected you will probably see just One update for Windows. This may be a version upgrade or a cumulative update, but it may be a be a big one and if it is a version upgrade you may get a CU immediately afterwards.

 

So just one update - great eh??? No, that’s there the qualifier "Windows" that I used above comes in...

 

The updates above keep the underlying Windows OS updated. There may be other things that need updating as well. "Abobe Flashplayer" is a separate stream of small updates which MS frequently push out, Other Microsoft components such as ".NET" runtimes also have separate update streams, as do other MS products (Older and come current versions of Office etc). Some of those different product updates are cumulative (.net) and others discrete (and possibly numerous) older office versions).

 

Putting all of that together..At any point you may be offered one ore more of:

  • A Windows version upgrade
  • A Windows Cumulative update
  • A .net cumulative update for each version of .net framework installed
  • A flashplayer update
  • The MS malicious software removal tool
  • Sundry updates for other MS Products - These may be numerous, depending on the products.

That is still better than the hundreds of updates you might have experienced on older OS's. First time, the Cumulative updates may take a time to download, but again timewise much better timewise and quantity wise than before.

 

[Edited to add: The above discussion is based on the normal end-user update path that most Windows users are on - the so called "Current Build". Other tracks for business and beta testers ("insiders") exist. They do similar sorts of things but a different paces]

 

x64


Edited by x64, 14 January 2017 - 03:03 AM.


#7 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 04:34 AM

What x64 said is correct, Windows 10 updates are cumulative so you will never need all of the past updates because one or two current updates brings you completely up to date. A current update contains the ALL of the data that are included in the earlier updates, but they do not really grow in size.

 

And of course, just with everything else involved with Windows 10, even this technique is evolving. UUP updating is coming soon and you will like it. I have it installed right now, but it is a work in progress.

 

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2016/11/03/introducing-unified-update-platform-uup/#EU7SaV5gFqX1w1Uy.97


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#8 bcmo

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Posted 15 January 2017 - 04:19 PM

So basically whatever needs to be installed will be delivered to the update center (which in any case won't be much more than the regular monthly updates).

Thank you for the informative replies.



#9 x64

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 01:40 AM

Assuming it is Windows 10 only (no other MS produts), and the new PC is already on the latest version of Windows 10 (Aniversary update -version 1607/Redstone1) then the number of updates will numerically be small. However for the first update run the download volume will be large (as it contains all updates since last July), and it will take a bit longer to install. This is still faster than a five year old Windows 7 system needing three updating cycles and suppinf a couple of hundred updates before it is ready.

 

If th PC is not already on the Anniversary update, then there wil be an update to that as well (which is a very large update).



#10 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 16 January 2017 - 06:59 AM

Again, x64 has a good point. Before you start accepting updates make sure that you already have the Anniversary Edition installed, which you can see in winver as version 1607.


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