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How to read a firewall


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#1 FabricOfLife

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 10:40 PM

I just installed TinyWall firewall and noticed this:

 

tinywall.jpg

 

I don't understand the source and destination addresses, any tips on how to interpret or translate them into real paths?

 

Any tips on how to read this would be most welcome.



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#2 shadow_647

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 05:37 AM

dousen't look like anything to me that has anything to do with a ip.

I don't know if tinywall understands ipv6 ...what os you using bro ?



#3 dc3

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 12:41 PM

TinyWall firewall was meant to be used in conjunction with Windows 7 and forward firewalls, I omitted Vista because of the big improvement of Windows' firewall in Windows 7.  The combination of the two complements each other to create a very effective firewall.  Unfortunately I was not able to find any form of instructions for the use of TinyWall.  I would suggest that you call their support department and see if they can point you to instructions for their firewall.


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#4 Didier Stevens

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Posted 17 January 2017 - 05:40 PM

The source and destination IP addresses are IPv6 addresses.

 

The source address is a public IPv6 address, it's assigned to an ISP in Greece.

The destination address is a reserved multicast address. Maybe solicited-node: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solicited-node_multicast_address


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#5 FabricOfLife

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 02:54 PM

Thanks to everyone who replied. I am using Windows 7.

 

I finally uninstalled it because I couldn't interpret what it was saying and it was making me paranoid.

 

Since I am based in Greece, it could have been simply my ISP exchanging information with my computer. So I suppose nothing to be worried about. 

 

I visited the link on Solicited node and can't understand a thing. Can you suggest any reading material for beginners?

 

I visited some website to see what my ip is and some of them show an ip with numbers while others show the longer ip with letters and numbers. When I go to cmd> ipconfig I see an ip so-called ipv6 and an ipv4. I just wonder when did this ipv6 come in existence! So basically we now have 2 types of ips at the same time?



#6 Didier Stevens

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 03:53 PM

The first IPv6 standard was published in 1998.

IPv6 has been in Windows since Windows Vista.

Yes, a network adapter can have many IP addresses. Not only different versions, but also several of the same version.

What your public IP is, depends on what your ISP provides: you have ISPs that provide IPv4 only (still), and there are ISPs that provide both. I don't think there are many ISPs (if any) that provide IPv6 only.

 

Regarding reading material. What's your level? For example, do you know what IP, TCP and UDP is?


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#7 FabricOfLife

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 05:12 PM

Wow 1998! I had no idea!

I have heard of TCP/IP referred to as the protocol that internet uses but in what way, how and why.. I have no idea. UDP never heard of. 



#8 Didier Stevens

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Posted 19 January 2017 - 06:44 PM

Then you need a beginners book. I wouldn't know which one to recommend though.

Maybe someone else can.


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#9 King_Yoshi

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 01:53 PM

Then you need a beginners book. I wouldn't know which one to recommend though.
Maybe someone else can.

Its not a small book. But I began with CompTIA Network+ All-In-One Exam Guide, Sixth Edition (Exam N10-006).

For a free alternative I would suggest the book from the following website; Introduction to Networking: How the Internet Works

Youtube also has some great videos if you search "Intro to networking".


Edited by King_Yoshi, 20 January 2017 - 01:54 PM.


#10 FabricOfLife

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Posted 20 January 2017 - 06:20 PM

Thanks a lot guys!

 

I appreciate all the replies and the suggestions! I am excited to try to delve into this field that seems kind of arcane for a beginner! I'll start with the Youtube videos and I ll check out both books as well. Thanks again.



#11 Didier Stevens

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Posted 22 January 2017 - 04:41 PM

You're welcome!


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If you send me messages, per Bleeping Computer's Forum policy, I will not engage in a conversation, but try to answer your question in the relevant forum post. If you don't want this, don't send me messages.

 

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