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Is There an Easy Way of Making the Larger Hard Drive the Main C: Drive?


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#1 NiTROACTiVE

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 01:03 AM

I have a iBUYPOWER BB921 (a gaming PC) that has Windows 10 Home, which has a 1 TB hard drive, as well as a 120 GB solid-state drive. As you can see from the window below, all of the main Windows files are on the solid-state drive rather than the hard drive:

 

110adc8.jpg

 

With that said, is there an easy way to move all of the main Windows files to the hard drive? I know I can reassign letters to the drives with Windows, and I also read some tutorials on how to get a new hard drive, but I'm not sure how to do it without using hard drive clone software.

 

Is there an easy way to do it? If so, then how? Even if there's no easy way of doing it, I would still like instructions on how to swap drive letters as well as to move all of my Windows files to the bigger hard drive.



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#2 shadow_647

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 01:56 AM

 

how to do it without using hard drive clone software

Ya full reinstall would be my guess, don't know why you would want to, you still have space on the ssd just stop installing stuff thier.



#3 Planemaster2

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 03:56 AM

So you want to move Windows 10 from the SSD to the HDD? Why on earth would you want to do that?

#4 shadow_647

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 04:40 AM

So you want to move Windows 10 from the SSD to the HDD? Why on earth would you want to do that?

 

Agreed, thats what i was thinking too, not hard to install apps on D drive.



#5 NiTROACTiVE

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Posted 08 January 2017 - 10:12 PM

So you want to move Windows 10 from the SSD to the HDD? Why on earth would you want to do that?

 

Well it because the HHD on my computer is bigger than the SSD.

 

If the space were to run out on the main C: drive, then what would happen? Would I just not be able to add more stuff to it, or could things get worse?



#6 shadow_647

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 03:35 AM

Point is you don't run out of space on C drive because you don't put anything on C drive but windows and maybe one of your favorite games if you have space or something.

 

As well point is you don't put windows + all your data on the same drive, if you do it makes life hell to clean up the mess if ever windows becomes a problem and you need to wipe it gone and reinstall.

 

Windows10 only needs what 12 gigs to install + page file + updates + drivers + favorite apps.

 

whats in their in any case that using 50 gigs space, my self im in winXP and my Os drive is like 20gigs, full install with everything i need is 6gigs 14 free.

Its a 40gig drive i chopped in two, might put win7 on the other part.


Edited by shadow_647, 09 January 2017 - 03:36 AM.


#7 Planemaster2

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 10:57 AM


So you want to move Windows 10 from the SSD to the HDD? Why on earth would you want to do that?

 
Well it because the HHD on my computer is bigger than the SSD.
 
If the space were to run out on the main C: drive, then what would happen? Would I just not be able to add more stuff to it, or could things get worse?

The SSD is designed for programs only. If you put a program on an SSD then it will have less load times. If you put Windows on it then it speeds up lots of areas of your computer. An HDD is for bulk storage (e.g. Files, videos etc...)

#8 vcolev

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 11:29 AM

Like most are saying, a reinstall would be the best way to do it, but doing so would be defeating the purpose of having the SSD.



#9 NiTROACTiVE

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 09:39 PM

 

 

So you want to move Windows 10 from the SSD to the HDD? Why on earth would you want to do that?

 
Well it because the HHD on my computer is bigger than the SSD.
 
If the space were to run out on the main C: drive, then what would happen? Would I just not be able to add more stuff to it, or could things get worse?

The SSD is designed for programs only. If you put a program on an SSD then it will have less load times. If you put Windows on it then it speeds up lots of areas of your computer. An HDD is for bulk storage (e.g. Files, videos etc...)

 

 

OK, I see. Well I'll just be careful not to install too many programs on the C: and install as many on the D: drive as I can (one program I installed wouldn't go on the C: drive for some reason). The bolded point is also a good point you made. So thanks for the advice and information there, Planemaster2.  :thumbup2:



#10 Planemaster2

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 01:21 PM

 

 

 

So you want to move Windows 10 from the SSD to the HDD? Why on earth would you want to do that?

 
Well it because the HHD on my computer is bigger than the SSD.
 
If the space were to run out on the main C: drive, then what would happen? Would I just not be able to add more stuff to it, or could things get worse?

The SSD is designed for programs only. If you put a program on an SSD then it will have less load times. If you put Windows on it then it speeds up lots of areas of your computer. An HDD is for bulk storage (e.g. Files, videos etc...)

 

 

OK, I see. Well I'll just be careful not to install too many programs on the C: and install as many on the D: drive as I can (one program I installed wouldn't go on the C: drive for some reason). The bolded point is also a good point you made. So thanks for the advice and information there, Planemaster2.  :thumbup2:

 

 

Install any programs that take a long time to boot up (e.g. some games/Photoshop etc...) and that's about it really. 120GB is quite small anyhow



#11 shadow_647

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 06:47 PM

lol my windows drive is 20gigs and the full install only needs 6gigson it, a linux install needs less for the Os ;)



#12 dc3

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 02:48 PM

The advantage of the SSD is the much faster boot time, this is especially true with Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 which have the fast startup.  I originally had my operating system installed on a 90GB SSD, the only items installed on this drive pertained to the Windows operating system.  I have a large HDD which I installed all of my other programs.  This worked out quite well, the SSD booted Windows much faster.  It was no inconvenience using the programs installed on the HDD.  The only reason this changed or would have changed was because I was given a much larger SSD.  


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