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What's the right switch for wireless keyboard & mouse?


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#1 Cynthia Moore

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 01:16 PM

I am in the process of upgrading an old Win XP computer to a brand new Win 10 notebook. I just got help sharing the monitor between the two machines. Now I need a little help sharing the wireless keyboard and mouse.

 

The wireless keyboard and mouse that I am using is similar to this one.

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0036E8V08/

 

The wireless transmitter is connected via USB 2.0 to the old PC.

 

I have checked out a number of USB switches. This Plugable unit looks like the best choice:

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006Z0Q2SI/

 

Any comments or suggestions?

 

(Edit: Changed IOGear to Plugable.)


Edited by Cynthia Moore, 05 January 2017 - 02:03 PM.

Running Win 10 & Office 365.


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#2 Cynthia Moore

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 02:23 PM

My apologies, I posted the wrong device above (damned Alzheimers).

 

The switch I think is the best choice is this one from Plugable. My only concern is that the cables are only 3’ long.

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006Z0Q2SI/

 

The other choices are this one from IOGear, also with 3’ cables (I think):

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BD8I2OY/

 

and this one from ieGeek. It has the longest cables, but also supports VGA, which I don’t need.

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KR39YMK/

 

Any comments on these choices?


Running Win 10 & Office 365.


#3 Kilroy

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 02:28 PM

I'm cheap and like to do things easy.  I'd use Remote Desktop.

 

Why do you need to be able to use the mouse, keyboard, and monitor on both machines?



#4 Cynthia Moore

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 02:39 PM

I'm cheap and like to do things easy.  I'd use Remote Desktop.

 

Why do you need to be able to use the mouse, keyboard, and monitor on both machines?

I'm pretty cheap myself and I definitely like to do things the easiest way possible.

 

I wasn't aware of Remote Desktop. I see that it is part of Chrome, right? I've used LogMeIn and GoToMeeting to access the home PC from the laptop while on vacation. It was never as good as being there. Is Remote desktop better? I don't mind using something like Remote Desktop if that's the only choice, but I would rather used the actual machine if possible.

 

I have a couple of applications that are mission critical that I cannot migrate to the new machine right away. One of them won't run on Win 10, so I need to switch to a different app and I need to convert 10-15 years of data. (sigh) That will take me a few weeks to complete the work. In the meantime, I want to do as much work as possible on the new machine, but I would rather not have two monitors, two keyboards, and two mice on the desktop.

 

If you have a better way to go, I am open to suggestions.


Running Win 10 & Office 365.


#5 Kilroy

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 02:47 PM

Running a Remote Access program on the same network is about the same as being on the machine.  Remote Desktop is built into Windows, but I don't know if it is in all versions, ie Home.

 

Here are the remote desktop instructions for Windows 7.  It does require a password, but that password could be a single character.

 

The advantage of using remote desktop is the machine just needs to be turned on and connected to the network.  It doesn't have to be in the same room or within X number of feet.  Plus you can open the Remote Desktop screen to do something and then minimize it and continue working on your new machine.



#6 Cynthia Moore

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 12:19 AM

Thanks for all the help. I bought the Plugable switch and it is working great.


Running Win 10 & Office 365.





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