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Do you leave your router on at all times?


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8 replies to this topic

#1 moota1514

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 09:10 AM

Just curious to how many never bother turning off their routers at any point - also are there any benefits to leaving it on all times?
I assume power consumption is quite minimal



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#2 Zenexer

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 10:05 AM

Power usage from an average home router is definitely minimal.  Most modern routers are designed to be left on at all times, but it's not uncommon to turn them off when they won't be in use for several hours or more.  For example, many businesses with open Wi-Fi hotspots turn off their equipment when they close for the night.

 

There are certainly security benefits to turning off your router, but if you have a good router that's well-configured and keep it up-to-date, those benefits are usually minimal.  Also, some consumer routers have a tendency to overheat or encounter other issues when left on for extended periods of time, especially as they age.

 

As far as benefits to leaving it on, I can't really think of any that would concern an average user, other than convenience.  Some multi-service providers (e.g., Verizon FiOS) require that the router stay on in order for other devices in your house, particularly telephones and televisions, to work properly.  If you have "smart home" devices, they'll likely need internet access to work, for which your router will need to remain on.



#3 Wand3r3r

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 12:30 PM

IMO routers/switches should be on all the time.  They are designed that way.  On/off - warm/cold can actually shorten the life of the equipment



#4 moota1514

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 01:20 PM

Power usage from an average home router is definitely minimal.  Most modern routers are designed to be left on at all times, but it's not uncommon to turn them off when they won't be in use for several hours or more.  For example, many businesses with open Wi-Fi hotspots turn off their equipment when they close for the night.

 

There are certainly security benefits to turning off your router, but if you have a good router that's well-configured and keep it up-to-date, those benefits are usually minimal.  Also, some consumer routers have a tendency to overheat or encounter other issues when left on for extended periods of time, especially as they age.

 

As far as benefits to leaving it on, I can't really think of any that would concern an average user, other than convenience.  Some multi-service providers (e.g., Verizon FiOS) require that the router stay on in order for other devices in your house, particularly telephones and televisions, to work properly.  If you have "smart home" devices, they'll likely need internet access to work, for which your router will need to remain on.

 

There are certainly security benefits to turning off your router,

And these benefits are...?

Or are you alleging that a specific router which is powered on only 12 hours per day is half as likely to be hacked as when it is on 24 hours per day?

By extrapolation, then, the safest router is one which is never powered on at all!



#5 shadow_647

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 01:30 PM

I power down mine when its not in use, as for on/off all the time doesn't last as long as all ways on don't know about that but i know what buddys talking about on this topic.

As well if you have a dynamic ip and you leave your thing on all the time and never power cycle it that means your keeping the same ip all the time, grate way to be tracked.



#6 Kilroy

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 02:16 PM

I leave mine on as I have the eero and it periodically checks my connection speeds and updates itself.  That and I have a number of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, Amazon Echo, Nest Thermostat, and Ring Doorbell that all need to be connected, especially the Ring since it stores its videos in the cloud.



#7 toofarnorth

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 05:49 AM

i leave mine on all the time

getting hacked isnt a problem. with the number of attacks coming in it doesnt matter if you are on just half the day or not.
the thing to worry about is when they find new hacks, not the number of hack attempts

imnsho :)

 

tfn



#8 Kilroy

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 01:51 PM

 

Or are you alleging that a specific router which is powered on only 12 hours per day is half as likely to be hacked as when it is on 24 hours per day?

By extrapolation, then, the safest router is one which is never powered on at all!

 

 

You are correct that the safest router is the one which is never powered on at all.  Unfortunately that also makes it the most useless router.

 

Security is a fine line between usability and security.  Generally the easier it is to use, the less secure it is.



#9 shadow_647

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 04:58 AM

Security is a fine line between usability and security.  Generally the easier it is to use, the less secure it is.

 

Agreed.

 

You can all so play around with this topic if you want to have some fun with your router.

 

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-choose-the-best-firmware-to-supercharge-your-wi-1694982764






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