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Moving Docs to second hard drive


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#1 tpm

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 11:27 AM

Hello
Bought a new computer with a 500 gig SSD and 3T 7200 rpm drive. My computer has 4 users and would like to know the best way to move all docs, pictures, etc to the larger drive. Also would it keep the user password protection?
Win 10

Thanks
Tom

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#2 MoxieMomma

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 11:47 AM

Hi:

 

There is a somewhat involved process for moving the entire Users Folder from the system drive (usually C:\) to the data drive (usually D:\).

There are advantages and disadvantages to doing this, especially on an OEM box.

See here.

 

If that's not feasible or desirable for you, there's an easier way (this is how I did it on my new, OEM Win10 box), by following these steps.

It will only create the same folder structure on the data drive and then you tell Windows to "merge" the data files to those new folders on the data drive.

This was excerpted from instructions I got at another forum:

 

Personally the way I did it is quite simple.

 

1) I created the following structure on my 1TB HDD.

D:\Users\<username>\Documents
D:\Users\<username>\Downloads
Etc.

This results in the same structure as if it were on the C: drive (C:\Users\<username>).

 

2) Now, I went in my user profile on the C: drive, right-clicked on the Documents, Music, Pictures, Videos and Downloads folders, then I went under the Location tab, and changed their path to their equivalent on the D: drive

D:\Users\<username>\Documents
D:\Users\<username>\Downloads
Etc.

 

3) It asked me if I wanted to merge the content of the folders, which I accepted to do. And now all of them are on the D: drive.

 

4) I also created a Program Files and Program Files (x86) on my D: drive, and when I install a program, if I want to install it on the D: drive, I simply change the drive letter during the install.

C:\Program Files (x86)\ArenaNet\Guild Wars 2 or
D:\Program Files (x86)\ArenaNet\Guild Wars 2

 

 

HTH,

MM


Edited by MoxieMomma, 03 January 2017 - 11:50 AM.


#3 tpm

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 12:35 PM

Ok, Thanks
I'll check it out

I just setup three users the way you explained and will keep my docs on the main C drive as it is password protected. This should help in keeping the 500 gig SSD from getting full. After the year warranty is up I'll no doubt switch the SSD for a 1T drive

Thanks again

Edited by tpm, 03 January 2017 - 06:11 PM.

Tom

#4 tpm

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 11:03 AM

Hi:
 
There is a somewhat involved process for moving the entire Users Folder from the system drive (usually C:\) to the data drive (usually D:\).
There are advantages and disadvantages to doing this, especially on an OEM box.
See here.
 
If that's not feasible or desirable for you, there's an easier way (this is how I did it on my new, OEM Win10 box), by following these steps.
It will only create the same folder structure on the data drive and then you tell Windows to "merge" the data files to those new folders on the data drive.
This was excerpted from instructions I got at another forum:
 
Personally the way I did it is quite simple.
 
1) I created the following structure on my 1TB HDD.
D:\Users\<username>\Documents
D:\Users\<username>\Downloads
Etc.

This results in the same structure as if it were on the C: drive (C:\Users\<username>).
 
2) Now, I went in my user profile on the C: drive, right-clicked on the Documents, Music, Pictures, Videos and Downloads folders, then I went under the Location tab, and changed their path to their equivalent on the D: drive
D:\Users\<username>\Documents
D:\Users\<username>\Downloads
Etc.

 
3) It asked me if I wanted to merge the content of the folders, which I accepted to do. And now all of them are on the D: drive.
 
4) I also created a Program Files and Program Files (x86) on my D: drive, and when I install a program, if I want to install it on the D: drive, I simply change the drive letter during the install.
C:\Program Files (x86)\ArenaNet\Guild Wars 2 or
D:\Program Files (x86)\ArenaNet\Guild Wars 2

 
 
HTH,
MM


Thanks again, worked out well. Now I'm trying to see if I can password protect folders in the second drive

Thanks again
Tom

#5 MoxieMomma

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 11:25 AM

Hi:

 

Great! :thumbup2:

I'm glad that worked for you.

 

 

will keep my docs on the main C drive as it is password protected

 

Every user's circumstances are different, but, if this were my computer, I would move your data from the system drive to the data drive sooner, rather than later.

That way, if you have some sort of OS catastrophe (backups and system images notwithstanding) requiring a factory image or nuke/pave, your data will be "safe" on the other drive.

Moreover, the sooner you do it, the less massive will be the load of files to move.

If you have File History enabled, you will actually take up some additional space on that system drive with documents.

(I did mine on my new OEM Win10 box several months ago shortly after setting it up and before I transferred all my data/documents/videos/pix from my old computer.)

 

I install my programs/apps to the system drive (C:\), as that is the default location and seems easiest.

There are advantages and disadvantages to doing so.

As the tutorial I provided earlier suggested, you can choose to do both, installing some programs to the data drive, if they work OK from that non-default location.

 

Yes, there are ways to "protect" files and folders in Win10.  It's actually a form of "encryption".

 

Here are some tutorials to get you started, until someone comes along here with more advice:

 

 

Cheers,

MM

 

 



#6 tpm

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 11:32 AM

Ok thanks again
I keep several backups with one being off site
Tom

#7 MoxieMomma

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 01:02 PM

Hi:

 

Sounds good. Yes, redundant on-site and off-site data backups (and system images) are a good idea. :thumbup2:

I'm glad I could help.

 

Cheers,

MM






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