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Best Free Antivirus


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#1 SociallyAwkward

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 01:57 PM

Hey guys

 

I've been using Bitdefender Total for the past year but now due to financial constraints i need to use free anti-virus for a while. I've researched a bit and i think it's between Avast or Avira. What do you think? any suggestions? Oh, and will the free antivirus effectively protect my pc from getting infected? I'd like something that would have web browsing protection, too, which Avast has but not Avira. So I'm currently leaning more to Avast. Thanks.


Edited by SociallyAwkward, 02 January 2017 - 02:12 PM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 02:11 PM

There is no universal "one size fits all" solution that works for everyone and there is no single best anti-virus. Every vendor's virus lab and program scanning engine is different. Each has has its own strengths and weaknesses and they often use a mix of technologies to detect and remove malware. Choosing an anti-virus is a matter of personal preference, your needs, your technical ability and experience, features offered, user friendliness, ease of updating (and upgrading to new program release), ease of installation/removal, availability of quality/prompt technical support from the vendor and price. Other factors to consider include detection rates and methods, scanning engine effectiveness, how often virus definitions are updated, the amount of resources the program utilizes, how it may affect system performance and what will work best for your system. A particular anti-virus that works well for one person may not work as well for another. Everyone's system is different and sometimes you may need to experiment and find the one most suitable for your needs.

Here are links to some related discussion topics:
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#3 shadow_647

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 02:41 PM

I like Avira My self and i have the newest version installed at the moment, it using about 240megs ram and nothing cpu wise, as well i can update Avira manually, something i really like seeing as sadly most AV have turned in to spyware and if you go cloud then your part of their defensive botnet, something i really dont like so i block everything the Avira can do on a firewall level.

 

Don't like the idea of anyone being able to know everything i have on my computer and be able to take any file they want off my computer any time they want.

 

Besides that i only have good things to say about Avira.



#4 SociallyAwkward

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 03:10 PM

I like Avira My self and i have the newest version installed at the moment, it using about 240megs ram and nothing cpu wise, as well i can update Avira manually, something i really like seeing as sadly most AV have turned in to spyware and if you go cloud then your part of their defensive botnet, something i really dont like so i block everything the Avira can do on a firewall level.

 

Don't like the idea of anyone being able to know everything i have on my computer and be able to take any file they want off my computer any time they want.

 

Besides that i only have good things to say about Avira.

Okay, i don't like the idea of anyone being able to do that either! feel like it's so nearly impossible to be safe online these days :( another idea i had was just trying free trials of paid versions of the best antiviruses(AVG, Avast, etc), and keep changing after 30 day trial is up.



#5 quietman7

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 03:14 PM

At some point in time you will run out of free trials to try, then what?
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#6 SociallyAwkward

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 03:19 PM

At some point in time you will run out of free trials to try, then what?

Hopefully by then my finances will be in order again, or restart the cycle lol. But just toying with ideas, don't think I'd actually do that. Really not looking forward to the constant pop-ups from free AV asking me to upgrade though. Most people seem to recommend avira, and although there isn't ONE best anti-virus as you said, I'm still looking for most recommended. 



#7 quietman7

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 03:31 PM

Both free and paid for products typically use the same scanning engine, detection and removal methods when in comes to malware disinfection. The primary benefit of paid for anti-virus or anti-malware products is that most of them offer additional features such as real-time protection against malware infection and free technical support. In contrast, free versions are limited...typically used as stand-alone scanners or to provide some behind the scene protection.

Also keep in mind that many anti-virus vendors are bundling toolbars and other software with their products as a cost recoup measure and revenue generator. In fact, all free Anti-virus programs now come with toolbars or other bundled software (and annoying prompts to upgrade) except Bitdefender Free, Sophos Home, Microsoft Security Essentials and Windows 8/10 Defender.

If you have not done so already, you may want to read:
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#8 MoxieMomma

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 03:37 PM

Hi:
 

At some point in time you will run out of free trials to try, then what?

 

^^^ Well said. ^^^

 

 

Okay, i don't like the idea of anyone being able to do that either! feel like it's so nearly impossible to be safe online these days :( another idea i had was just trying free trials of paid versions of the best antiviruses(AVG, Avast, etc), and keep changing after 30 day trial is up.


(emphasis mine)
 
 AVG was recently purchased by Avast, so the AVG brand may not be around much longer.  That will be one less free trial.

 

----

 

There's nothing wrong with a healthy dose of skepticism and situational awareness.

But, at some point, one needs to temper with a bit of common sense one's paranoia about MS, every computer software company and every 3-letter government agency "spying" on one's PC.

There are probably a few billion internet-connected computers (and devices!!!) out there.

Unless you have a few million dollars in your checking account or something else of real value or you're engaging in CP, the bad guys/good guys/MS/AV vendors probably are not interested in checking your browsing history or in reading your emails on your personal computer.

If one goes online, someone, somewhere will probably see the links you click, items you search for, sites you visit, etc. It is a fact of life in 2017.

Many people seem to spend countless hours obsessing about being spied upon by ___ (a largely theoretical concern for the average user), rather than on devising and implementing a common-sense, "best practices" strategy to keeping their computers, data and identity safe from ransomware attack, malware infection or other, much more REAL, tangible threats.

 

At the end of the day, one either needs to put some modicum of trust into reputable companies and their security products and "safe hex", or one needs to strongly consider disconnecting entirely from the internet, to be truly "safe".

 

JMHO,

MM
 

 
 



#9 SociallyAwkward

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 04:00 PM

Hi:
 

At some point in time you will run out of free trials to try, then what?

 

^^^ Well said. ^^^

 

 

Okay, i don't like the idea of anyone being able to do that either! feel like it's so nearly impossible to be safe online these days :( another idea i had was just trying free trials of paid versions of the best antiviruses(AVG, Avast, etc), and keep changing after 30 day trial is up.


(emphasis mine)
 
 AVG was recently purchased by Avast, so the AVG brand may not be around much longer.  That will be one less free trial.

 

----

 

There's nothing wrong with a healthy dose of skepticism and situational awareness.

But, at some point, one needs to temper with a bit of common sense one's paranoia about MS, every computer software company and every 3-letter government agency "spying" on one's PC.

There are probably a few billion internet-connected computers (and devices!!!) out there.

Unless you have a few million dollars in your checking account or something else of real value or you're engaging in CP, the bad guys/good guys/MS/AV vendors probably are not interested in checking your browsing history or in reading your emails on your personal computer.

If one goes online, someone, somewhere will probably see the links you click, items you search for, sites you visit, etc. It is a fact of life in 2017.

Many people seem to spend countless hours obsessing about being spied upon by ___ (a largely theoretical concern for the average user), rather than on devising and implementing a common-sense, "best practices" strategy to keeping their computers, data and identity safe from ransomware attack, malware infection or other, much more REAL, tangible threats.

 

At the end of the day, one either needs to put some modicum of trust into reputable companies and their security products and "safe hex", or one needs to strongly consider disconnecting entirely from the internet, to be truly "safe".

 

JMHO,

MM
 

 
 

That's true, hey. no use in being paranoid although it isn't a pleasant thought that "If one goes online, someone, somewhere will probably see the links you click, items you search for, sites you visit, etc."


Both free and paid for products typically use the same scanning engine, detection and removal methods when in comes to malware disinfection. The primary benefit of paid for anti-virus or anti-malware products is that most of them offer additional features such as real-time protection against malware infection and free technical support. In contrast, free versions are limited...typically used as stand-alone scanners or to provide some behind the scene protection.

Also keep in mind that many anti-virus vendors are bundling toolbars and other software with their products as a cost recoup measure and revenue generator. In fact, all free Anti-virus programs now come with toolbars or other bundled software (and annoying prompts to upgrade) except Bitdefender Free, Sophos Home, Microsoft Security Essentials and Windows 8/10 Defender.

If you have not done so already, you may want to read:

 

I'll be giving this a read right now, thanks for the advice



#10 shadow_647

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 04:03 PM

There's nothing wrong with a healthy dose of skepticism and situational awareness.

But, at some point, one needs to temper with a bit of common sense one's paranoia about MS, every computer software company and every 3-letter government agency "spying" on one's PC.

There are probably a few billion internet-connected computers (and devices!!!) out there.

Unless you have a few million dollars in your checking account or something else of real value or you're engaging in CP, the bad guys/good guys/MS/AV vendors probably are not interested in checking your browsing history or in reading your emails on your personal computer.

If one goes online, someone, somewhere will probably see the links you click, items you search for, sites you visit, etc. It is a fact of life in 2017.

Many people seem to spend countless hours obsessing about being spied upon by ___ (a largely theoretical concern for the average user), rather than on devising and implementing a common-sense, "best practices" strategy to keeping their computers, data and identity safe from ransomware attack, malware infection or other, much more REAL, tangible threats.

 

At the end of the day, one either needs to put some modicum of trust into reputable companies and their security products and "safe hex", or one needs to strongly consider disconnecting entirely from the internet, to be truly "safe".

 

 

 

Well i kind of disagree with that last post on many levels but i do know what you mean about 100% disconnecting to be safe from being spied on when it comes to the internet, min you start using the net theirs limits to how much privacy you can have, at the same time you can go full stealth mode if you want if you know how to but theirs are limits to how far i want to go on that topic, in any case you can't really serf the net in full stealth mode, iv tried and everywhere i go i get blocked cus everyone thinks im a bot cus they can't tell who or what i am.

 

Douse that mean ill use win10, no

Douse that mean i want to be part of a defensive botnet for the AV guys, no

Douse that mean ill install free to use software or online games that phone home and data mine all over the place, no

 

I run 4 firewalls back to back for a reason btw, its so i can see what people are trying to do.

 

Anyways going a bit off topic so back to topic.

Good read here on this link as to what the AV guys are up to of late in regards to phoning home and data mining.

 

http://www.av-comparatives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/avc_datasending_2014_en.pdf

 

Ps: Avira installer doesn't install any 3rd party junk as far as i know and no popups, just don't sine up for cloud and block everything on a firewall level and your golden if you care about your privacy, do updates manual stile.



#11 SociallyAwkward

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 04:13 PM

Wow, internet really isn't safe, huh? i think by practicing safe surfing(for the most part anyway - i still use uTorrent, but very rarely), and by having a good AV and anti-malware, you should be relatively fine. i don't think everyone is out to get you and besides, I'm sure our activities aren't that interesting anyways. It is kinda crappy that privacy isn't a reality, though.



#12 shadow_647

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 04:30 PM

Well you can't 100% stop the privacy invasion topic when using the net or a computer but you can severely limit people from spying on you in a big way if you setup for it, example dont use win10 lol.



#13 quietman7

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 06:37 PM

Security is all about layers and not depending on and not depending on any one solution, technology or approach to protect you.

You may want to read this related discussion topic.

I have come to the conclusion that if you choose to use the Internet, you should assume nothing is ever totally safe and nothing is ever totally private.
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#14 shadow_647

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 01:50 AM

I like this topic as well though many don't seem to think its a valid way to defend vs anything, example custom firmware on your router vs default.

 

security through obscurity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_through_obscurity

 

As for Layered security, iv done 4 routers "nat" back to back just for fun once all with custom firmware, as well this is why i run 4 firewalls back to back, on the AV topic though its best not go start using more then one at a time, on the same Os install, same gos with firewalls though you can depending on what were talking about using, problem is if they try and use the same resources at the same time you can bomb your Os install going their or end up with other problems.



#15 SaraDominus

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 09:10 AM

You can use the built-in windows defender + malwarebytes anti-exploit free version
 
Moreover, Avira Free Antivirus is aslo fast, friendly, doesn't give you too many prompts and alerts, can identify unwanted apps inside legitimate applications and most importantly of all, achieved 100 percent malware detection in tests - a score shared with BitDefender and Kaspersky, but significantly ahead of many of its rivals.
 
Don't forget the fourth one. You also gotta keep an eye on other people less scrupulous and informed than you, who use your computer.
Make them a local account, so they can't mess things up too bad.
 





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