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More Linux graphics driver issues


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 09:56 AM

Hello,
I am using Ubuntu 16.04 on my desktop and am upgrading from a GTX 750ti to a RX 480. I installed the drivers from AMD's website. Now, when I boot up with the RX 480 installed I just get a black screen after Ubuntu boots up. I can't get into tty1 or anything. What went wrong?

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#2 pcpunk

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 05:44 PM

You followed the directions at this link I presume?

 

What did you install first the drivers or the Hardware it's unclear to me?  I suspect you know to install Hardware first, then the drivers?


Edited by pcpunk, 31 December 2016 - 06:22 PM.

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#3 cat1092

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 06:18 AM

On Ubuntu 16.04, the only choice is to use the open source drivers that's built in, because 16.04 & above doesn't support the proprietary drivers anymore. And one reason why I chose the GTX 1060 over the 8GB GDDR5 Sapphire Nitro+ Radeon RX 480, it's more beneficial to Windows users only. 

 

My suggestion would to be reinstall & use the open source drivers already provided, in fact, that's the only choice one has with the RX 480 or any current AMD cards, if running Ubuntu 16.04 or higher. Or go back to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, still supported through April 2019. :)

 

May not be what you want to hear, yet that's how it is. :(

 

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Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#4 pcpunk

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Posted 01 January 2017 - 10:48 PM

Sorry Captian_Chicken, I think I was drunk when I posted earlier.  What exactly have you tried to Terminal in and uninstall the driver?  Does the Shift Key get you anywhere.  Does CTRL+ALT+F2 Get you anywhere, then you could uninstall with "amdgpu-pro-uninstall" after logging into your account, this is assuming you have backed up all your important files.


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#5 cat1092

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 05:11 AM

My opinion only, Ubuntu 16.04 can be reinstalled w/out reformatting /home, so that your documents, downloads, whatever is preserved. :)

 

Reinstall 16.04, going through the usual steps, select the current Swap & /home, just don't place a check in the Format tab for /home. This is more commonly known as a 'fresh upgrade', which keeps your data intact while upgrading/reinstalling the OS when necessary, only root or '/' is formatted. This should clear the drivers installed & you'll boot into a clean system. 

 

As to AMD GPU drivers, there are none to install, other than AMD or Intel microcode, as can be seen when running the Driver Manager. The only thing that may need to be configured is screen resolution, though mine always ends up matching the attached monitor, be it a notebook or PC.

 

The fault lies with AMD on this one, for not providing Linux support for 16.04 & above, kind of odd, they're in desperate need of customers & are missing out on a large opportunity here, as the Linux Community as a whole is gaining ground at a steady pace. Mainly over the way Microsoft treated Windows 7 & 8.1 customers, as well as a half heated effort for Vista users & XP diehards discovering that software corporations are dropping the OS as though hot coals (this is also happening with a still supported Vista). Google has discontinued support for that OS, while they supported XP for two years after EOL, as well as some security offerings no longer offering upgrades. 

 

IMO, AMD has made a huge mistake in dropping Linux support for current cards in use & will pay the price for their decision, as more will shift to NVIDIA offerings. :)

 

My advice, if within your RMA period or return one if purchased locally, return the card & purchase a NVIDIA, even a 1050 Ti is a step up from a 750 Ti (though still 128 bit), and a 1060 (192 bit) would be a major leap at a fair price point. There are many 1060 models to choose from, though I recommend a brand that has above average support, EVGA being one, MSI also manufactures decent GPU's, don't have experience with other brands to advise on. Just read the reviews carefully, and look for consistency, say if several users are complaining about coil whine, that's a sign to look at another model. One star (or egg) reviews in regards to slow shipping, I disregard, that's not about the product & they don't know how to write reviews, which is explained on most sites.

 

That is, if you still have that option. If not, then the 'fresh upgrade' install as described above will get you going fast. :)

 

Good Luck! :thumbup2:

 

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#6 Captain_Chicken

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Posted 02 January 2017 - 02:52 PM

Well, I tried. I am dual booting WIN 10 and linux on this machine, so i'll just wait until good drivers come out, if they ever do.


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#7 cat1092

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 04:39 AM

It would be fantastic if AMD went back to providing fglrx drivers for current & past cards for 16.04 & above, and one of the best decisions that they could make. :)

 

Even Intel provides support for their onboard graphic drivers, though users has to act fast upon release to get the proprietary ones, or will have to settle for the Nouveau drivers until the next round is offered. With NVIDIA, as you likely know, all one needs to do is add the PPA to the Update Manager & within a few seconds to a minute, the latest drivers are appearing in the Driver Manager. Sometimes, I find it best to stay behind one driver release for best results, though overall, this is as good as it gets. 

 

https://johners.tech/2016/07/installing-the-latest-nvidia-graphics-drivers-on-linux-mint-18/

 

AMD also need to make it prominent in their offerings that for the time being, there is no proprietary Linux support (fglrx drivers), so that Linux users can make an informed decision as to which card to upgrade to. As stated above, they're missing out on a huge opportunity here, with interest in Linux distros gaining. Gamers will likely need premium support, rather than letting the open source community do their work for them. While I had no issues with my AMD card when installed, will never know how it may had affected gaming or any type of power usage. 

 

To make matters worse, there's millions of unsold AMD computers of all types on retail shelves, online, or sitting in warehouses waiting to be distributed. Experienced Linux users will most likely stay away from these offerings, at least until the next gen AMD cards are released, which should have Linux support, though no guarantees or promises yet that I'm aware of. 

 

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#8 wizardfromoz

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 12:33 AM

Although this Topic appears to be completed, albeit not very satisfactorily for the OP (Hi, Captain) - just a note for the viewers:

 

If following the (good) guide provided by link from friend pcpunk at #2 -

 

There is a line, there

tar -Jxvf amdgpu-pro-16.50-362463.tar.xz

... that is an uppercase J, not a lowercase j - but copying it should suffice.

 

With tar archives J is for those of the .xz variety, and j is for the bzip.

 

Cheers all

 

:wizardball: Wizard



#9 cat1092

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 02:25 AM

My apologies, didn't read the link that pcpunk provided close enough. :)

 

It seems that AMD has supported selected lines of cards for Linux, while keeping many more wide open for the latest Windows drivers (example, my not in use Radeon HD R7770 GHz edition). And the AMD RX 480 is supported, which is good for Captain_Chicken! :thumbup2:

 

Only thing being, looks like it would take one very experienced with unpacking tarballs, etc. to pull this off with success, every last step has to be followed to the letter, though I must confess that any support is better than none. Too bad that AMD couldn't just ship this in the default format for it's intended Linux audience (Ubuntu uses .deb files, with or w/out the Terminal). 

 

Page that pcpunk posted again for clarity, maybe someone who has performed this will dive in. The main thing is keeping the Topic alive, it's OK to 'bump' once in a while, so that it doesn't get buried 3-4 pages deep. :)

 

http://support.amd.com/en-us/kb-articles/Pages/AMDGPU-PRO-Install.aspx

 

AMD could had done a better job of letting Linux users know of this, as well as not 'pick & choose' which cards makes the cut, while others still fully supported on Windows didn't. While for now, this pertains to the OP's Topic, it would be interesting to perform on a not too old non-supported card (that's supported on Windows) & see what happens, nothing to lose if the drive is imaged & the user knows how to restore. :)

 

Cat


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