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Full list of every way you can be tracked online and on your computer?


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#1 Thelps

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 09:36 AM

Looking for a full list of every way you can be tracked online.

 

I'm interested in anonymising my computer activity and protecting its contents, as well as keeping my internet use completely private.

 

The reason for this is I'm being harassed in my local area and maintaining digital privacy would be the simplest way to prevent this activity.

 

Any and all detailed methods to maintain online anonymity and protects the contents of a computer would be appreciated.

 

List so far:

 

- ISP logs websites.

- Malware (Trojans, Rootkits, Keyloggers, memory-only malware)

- Tracker programs attached to websites such as youtube's s.ytimg.com

- Your Internet Port.

- Your DNS Server if it logs traffic.

- Browser program's logs stored locally on your computer, including cookies.

 

There are a few others I may be forgetting presently but that starts the list.

 

I have been running a VPN for a while but either the VPN is compromised or the owners of the VPN company aren't holding to their stated privacy policy.

 

Further ways you can be tracked online or via malware would be appreciated. Solutions and tested, known-to-be-working fixes would be even better.

 

Appreciate your assistance.

 



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#2 Gary R

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 11:04 AM

Just what you need to do to remain private online depends on who you're trying to remain private from. If you're wanting to remain private from the state, then forget it, because they have the kind of resources available to circumvent anything you're likely to be able to deploy.

However, keeping private from non-state entities is usually viable to a greater or lesser degree, it just depends on how "serious" you want to get.

If you're wanting something a bit more "private" than a VPN, then try the TOR browser ... https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en

For more info on TOR read ... https://www.torproject.org/about/overview.html.en ... and ... https://www.torproject.org/docs/documentation.html.en

For something a bit more "private" still, try Qubes ... https://www.qubes-os.org/intro/ ... https://www.qubes-os.org/doc/ ... which is a whole OS dedicated to keeping your online communications private.

There should be enough info on the pages I've linked to, to give you some idea of what you're up against, if you truly do want to keep some level of online anonymity.


Edited by Gary R, 29 December 2016 - 11:08 AM.


#3 Thelps

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 11:54 AM

Thanks for the tips Gary R. I wasn't aware of Qubes.

 

I don't see why the State would want to track me, and according to legislation in the country I'm in they'd require a warrant to pull up my logs from the ISP. A warrant requires a reasonable suspicion and if the reasonable suspicion isn't corroborated by my logs then the investigating entity would lose credibility with the judge issuing the warrant. Since I don't perform illegal activities online it's unrealistic for repeated warrants to be issued against me. Consequently the state won't be investigating my logs. If they are then they'd be liable to legal counter-action by myself which, in an aggravated case (which this certainly is, as it's been going on for years, despite repeated complaints by myself that it's a waste of their time and mine, due to absence of illegal activity) I'd be able to take litigation action against them for damages and harassment. They also have a duty to maintain my anonymity towards entities outside of the investigation.

 

I'm assuming that the 3rd party investigating me is a private entity. In effect, hey're a 'hacker' of some variety, though it may not be via software installed on my computer.

 

Further ideas as to how to effectively maintain the anonymity of my internet activities and computer's contents would be appreciated. Either from yourself or others.



#4 Gary R

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 05:27 PM

If you feel your computer may have been compromised with some sort of "spyware", then assuming that you don't want to spend time searching your existing OS for "bugs", and you don't want to go through all the grief of a reformat, then you could always boot from an alternative OS contained on a USB device, and then use TOR from within that OS.

 

That way any spyware is bypassed because it is installed on your existing OS and you're not booting from that, and since TOR uses multiple encrypted links to connect across the internet, then your browsing should also be secure.

 

Most Linux distros can be installed to and run from a USB drive, and TOR does have Linux versions available.



#5 Crazy Cat

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 05:56 PM

That way any spyware is bypassed because it is installed on your existing OS and you're not booting from that, and since TOR uses multiple encrypted links to connect across the internet, then your browsing should also be secure.
 
Most Linux distros can be installed to and run from a USB drive, and TOR does have Linux versions available.


The issue is the TOR exit nodes. Tor Exit Nodes Located and Mapped. https://hackertarget.com/tor-exit-node-visualization/

TOR: Not So Anonymous. https://www.grc.com/sn/sn-493-notes.pdf
Exposing Malicious Tor Exit Relays. http://www.cs.kau.se/philwint/spoiled_onions/techreport.pdf
 

Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe. ― Albert Einstein ― Insanity is doing the same thing, over and over again, but expecting different results.

 

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#6 Gary R

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 01:48 AM

Knowing where some Tor nodes are is one thing, predicting which Tor users are using it (and when), and therefore being able to successfully and reliably spy on just one particular individual, is another thing altogether.

 

No communication is ever entirely secure from interception, but running Tor from within an OS which you keep on a USB drive, is probably as secure as most people will need.



#7 Crazy Cat

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 03:28 PM

(1) Knowing where some Tor nodes are is one thing, predicting which Tor users are using it (and when), and therefore being able to successfully and reliably spy on just one particular individual, is another thing altogether.
 
(2) No communication is ever entirely secure from interception, but running Tor from within an OS which you keep on a USB drive, is probably as secure as most people will need.


(1) There's another technique for that. That's why it's advised to TOR exit node <HTTPS> WWW

(2) Agreed.
 

Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe. ― Albert Einstein ― Insanity is doing the same thing, over and over again, but expecting different results.

 

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#8 Thelps

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 10:32 AM

Has anyone gotten any better ideas to do with the original question?

Starting to think my VPN is deliberately tracking/logging me, or that they're TOO good at their job and have attracted some form of organised surveillance agency.

Edited by Thelps, 03 January 2017 - 10:33 AM.


#9 shadow_647

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 11:20 AM

One thing you could do is setup a 2nd computer with twin lan cards down the pipe and set your self up with some network logging software, my self i like using winXP for this seeing as a simple reg hack for winxp and you can turn it in to a router and log everything from their as well with more mods to winxp i can disabled everything in the Os that uses the network stack so its 100% silent.

 

This app as well is useful when doing this kind of thing.

 

https://www.wireshark.org/

 

Btw what did you say your Os was ?

Firewall setup please.

Anti-virus setup please.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0l_54thSYU


Edited by shadow_647, 03 January 2017 - 11:23 AM.


#10 shelf life

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Posted 03 January 2017 - 05:08 PM

you might find these useful;

 

https://www.privacytools.io/#ukusa

 

https://thatoneprivacysite.net/


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