Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

IP Addresses and Android Mobile Devices


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 29 December 2016 - 02:52 AM

I have MetroPCS as my phone service provider and a Samsung Mobile Device.

 

I want to know if the IP Addresses are Dynamic or Static, or something inbetween.  By "in between" I mean like what I have with my Time-Warner Cable service, where the IP Address is called "Dynamic" but it never really changes, not even if you unplug the modem for a week (I went on vacation).  I had a client that needed a bona-fide Static IP Address and she had to pay Time Warner extra for it, in order to prevent them from changing it.  Another thing I've learned is that if I replace the cable modem box, the IP Address will then change.  To me, this implies that if the MAC Address of the box stays the same, the IP Address will also.

 

Is it pretty much the same with my mobile device?  Is the IP Address "static" based on the phone number, the MAC Address, does it "rotate" and if so how often?

What would be cool is if there were some kind of App that would ping and record my device's external IP Address every "xx" minutes, or whatever, so that I could see if it changes, how often in changes, etc...

 

As an FYI, I read an article on TorrentFreak about at least one organization that records your IP Address when you visit a particular website and then posts that information on the internet for anyone to look at.  This feels WAY to Big Brother-y to me and I am going to start taking countermeasures, i.e. VPN, etc... and since Mobile Devices are the future, I need to learn more about them.  Also the transition from IPv4 to IPv6, which I also need to learn more about so if anyone has any help in that regard, I'd be appreciative.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 13,254 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia

Posted 29 December 2016 - 03:02 AM

 

As an FYI, I read an article on TorrentFreak about at least one organization that records your IP Address when you visit a particular website and then posts that information on the internet for anyone to look at.

I heard about that,
http://iknowwhatyoudownload.com/en/contacts/

 

IKWDB knows everything that you do with your BitTorrent including your IP address.


Arch Linux .
 
 Come join the fun, chat to Bleeping computer members and staff in real time on Discord.
 
The BleepingComputer Official Discord Chat Server!


#3 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 29 December 2016 - 03:47 AM

 

 

As an FYI, I read an article on TorrentFreak about at least one organization that records your IP Address when you visit a particular website and then posts that information on the internet for anyone to look at.

I heard about that,
http://iknowwhatyoudownload.com/en/contacts/

 

IKWDB knows everything that you do with your BitTorrent including your IP address.

 

 

Actually it doesn't.  That's neither here nor there.  The topic is about IP Addresses and Mobile Devices. Do you know anything about that?



#4 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 09 January 2017 - 04:29 PM

Bump.



#5 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 25 January 2017 - 12:31 PM

Bump.



#6 Animal

Animal

    Bleepin' Animinion


  • Site Admin
  • 35,317 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Where You Least Expect Me To Be
  • Local time:12:53 AM

Posted 26 January 2017 - 03:43 PM

Charlie Stobert @Quora says it as well as I can.

It changes frequently.

The UE (User Equipment) or "mobile phone" is assigned an address by a process similar to DHCP by the mobile operator in question.

Every time the UE is restarted, or even when moving across an invisible network boundary that you're not even aware of, your IP address is likely to change.

Also most operators would have to use NAT to translate a private address assigned to the UE to a public address in order to conserve public IP addresses and that is completely dynamic. See my other answers on this topic for more information.


I verified this by checking my IP on the device at home. Then at a work location on the same day. They are two vastly different IP's with the same major carrier and I was not in a roaming mode. The locations were under 40 miles apart.

The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein (1879-1955)


Follow BleepingComputer on: Facebook | Twitter | Google+

#7 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

  • Guests
  • OFFLINE
  •  

Posted 26 January 2017 - 11:23 PM

Charlie Stobert @Quora says it as well as I can.

It changes frequently.

The UE (User Equipment) or "mobile phone" is assigned an address by a process similar to DHCP by the mobile operator in question.

Every time the UE is restarted, or even when moving across an invisible network boundary that you're not even aware of, your IP address is likely to change.

Also most operators would have to use NAT to translate a private address assigned to the UE to a public address in order to conserve public IP addresses and that is completely dynamic. See my other answers on this topic for more information.


I verified this by checking my IP on the device at home. Then at a work location on the same day. They are two vastly different IP's with the same major carrier and I was not in a roaming mode. The locations were under 40 miles apart.

 
Did you factor in whether or not you were connected to a wireless network (vs. straight cell phone connection).  Do you know of any software that might record external IP Addresses?  I have a bunch of questions.  What's your level of interest in this?  High?  Middling?  Barely?
 
Oh, and thanks.  I've been wondering this for weeks.
 
Is the IP Address IPv4, IPv6, or both?  I'm roughly familiar with v4, but I think it's time to educate myself on v6 since that seems to be the way of things.
 
One of my "areas of interest", or reason for being interested has to do with privacy.  Couple weeks ago, someone sent me a link showing that some online "entity" is collecting the IP addresses of P2P filesharing torrents and posting them online, so that if someone knows "your" IP address, they can run a google search of it, and discover not  only that you've been P2P filesharing, but WHAT files you've been sharing.  So the idea that "your" IP address has become a means of identifying you online is a privacy concern.  So I ran a search of "my" IP address and found a bunch of edits that I made on Wikipedia.
 
What if I don't want (for example) the people that run Bleeping Computer (or Craigslist, or Disqus, or this forum, or that forum) to know what edits I've made to Wikipedia, and/or what comments I've made in it's "Discussion Pages". What if (for example) you were a secret, closeted Scooby Doo fan, and you put hours and hours of effort on the Scooby Doo Wikipedia article, Scoobying and Dooing to your heart's content, letting your truest and most passionate super-sleuthing crimesolving meddling teenager edit to your hearts content, and then have someone in another area of your computing "life" discover this shameful fact of your identity.
 
In short, I don't like IP addresses being "permanent".  I'd like some idea of how often they change.  Yesterday I was in the waiting room of a doctor's office, and I connected to the free wireless to kill some time.  No my real identity, my medical records, my IP address and what site's I visited are all together in a common "node" of an unsecured public network.  It's a really big deal.  Just ask Hillary.
 
I make this little speech because I asked the same question on another forum and the thread got closed because the Moderator there thought I was trying to do something nefarious, like if they gave me Ye Olde Ancient Secrete of the esoteric IP Address Death Magic, somehow I would resurrect the Pagan Gods of Mordock and Greyhammer, and usher in the Age of Holy Sanctification.
 
I just wanna know.  Does it change every day?  Every time I restart the device?  Etc... I assume it depends on everything.  Manufacturer of the device, service provider, etc...  I know I'm not the only person wondering about this, and I wonder if, in response to all those invisible hoards of people that also want to know, some programmer hasn't made an App that "pings" every "x" minutes and makes a note every time your device's external IP Address changes.  Thanks for the link to Quora.  I'll go read that now.

#8 Animal

Animal

    Bleepin' Animinion


  • Site Admin
  • 35,317 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Where You Least Expect Me To Be

Posted 27 January 2017 - 02:56 PM

I did factor in what my connection was, it was 4G cellular data not WiFi or VoIP. I do not know of any IP recording software or apps that you're looking for. My tested IP's were v4. As for my particular interest in this specific case scenario? It is not very high.

To me an IP is the Internet equivalent of a mailing address. Be it a PO Box, mail forwarding service or even a physical location. When you request data or perform action on the Internet. You have send and receive packets. The data needs to know where it was sent from to know where to send the reply back to. Obfuscating your IP via Tor, VPN or any other anonymizing feature set just adds potential fail points. It also adds more people handling your traffic and more potential for abuse of your data. Thats my two cents on the subject.

Everyone is entitled to their feelings on the matter. As much as many people distrust the data aggregating large corporations. I have a distrust of the same organizations that claim to keep your data private. I rather have my adversary open and in plain sight. Than have to figure out what they are doing with my data in the shadows.

But back to obfuscation of your IP. Every exit and entrance point to hide your IP is known by 'someone'. You are never truly and completely anonymous on the Internet. Otherwise the very function of sending a data request and having it responded to would fail.

The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein (1879-1955)


Follow BleepingComputer on: Facebook | Twitter | Google+

#9 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 8,143 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA

Posted 27 January 2017 - 06:37 PM

 You are never truly and completely anonymous on the Internet. 

 

Applause, applause!!

 

I do not understand why anyone believes that anything that ever touches cyberspace can be genuinely anonymous.  One should operate under the assumption that if you put it out in cyberspace, and that includes what one thinks of as "private communications", it is de facto public.   A great deal of pre-digital anonymous communication was able to be traced back to its originator by those determined to do so.  The same thing applies to the internet, only it's easier for those doing the tracing, and that's even with active obfuscation techniques.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users