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Group Policy Editor program overwrote .adm, can I restore them?


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#1 Semi-Novice

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Posted 28 December 2016 - 10:15 PM

Hi guys!

 

After a bad install of Windows 10 crashed a very important document on my Windows 7 laptop 19 times, I finally gave up and bought a new computer. It's an HP with an Intel 1.6 GHz quad core, 4 GB memory, and 64-bit Windows 10 Home Edition. The memory and CPU were so bogged down with bloatware and "helpful" Windows processes I literally couldn't use it. I turned off everything I could manually, but some processes remain. Windows Defender in particular refused to recognize Avast Antivirus and disable itself. It was hogging nearly 50% CPU and memory.

 

So, I'm an idiot. I downloaded a new copy of a Group Policy Editor I've used before, but I didn't realize {or didn't stop to think} it was outdated {add_gpedit_msc_by_jwils876-d3kh6vm.zip}. It replaced my .adm files {system.adm, etc.} with 2009 versions. Windows' sfc scan recognizes the issue, but cannot repair the problem. I'm hesitant to wipe the computer and reinstall. I've heard horrible stories about resetting issues. Although, if I was going to try it, now would be the time before I invest any more energy into reinstalling old programs and files.

 

I also downloaded a startup editor {Autoruns.zip} that seems to do a good job of identifying processes and services that I can disable--which is really the only reason I would use the group policy editor at this point.

 

Is there an easy way to restore the .adm files, or is resetting the best option? Or, does it even matter if they're outdated?

 

Thanks very much in advance for your time. Hope you guys had a lovely holiday season, and are close to resolving the ridiculous lawsuit.

 

B.Paulsen



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#2 dc3

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 09:17 AM

Try doing a system restore, use a restore point dated prior to the installation of the GPE.

 

Just so you are aware, the GPE is not available in Windows 10 Home.  It is only available in Windows 10 Pro and above.


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#3 Semi-Novice

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 06:56 PM

Try doing a system restore, use a restore point dated prior to the installation of the GPE.

 

Just so you are aware, the GPE is not available in Windows 10 Home.  It is only available in Windows 10 Pro and above.

 

Hi Arachibutyrophobia,

 

Thanks for the quick reply! I couldn't get Defender to recognize Avast and disable itself. It was using almost 50% each of the CPU and memory, making it impossible to do simple tasks. So, I downloaded a group policy editor, which is how I ended up destroying the .adm files. For some reason, the restore points I created throughout the process of setting up the new system were deleted, and System Restore was turned off, even though I deliberately turned it on. None were available to restore the .adm files.

 

It's entirely possible I was feeling pressured to meet my deadline, as well as distracted by holiday stuff, and did something stupid to the settings because I was in too much of a hurry.

 

A malicious extension installed on Internet Explorer was also creating problems. Since it's a new system, I thought it might be best to just do a factory recovery. But. I've read that Windows 10 can quickly turn recovery into a massive headache.

 

Since there are no restore points, would you recommend a factory recovery, or should I just leave it alone?

 

Thanks again!!!



#4 dc3

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 12:57 PM

Yes, I would do a System Recovery.  This reinstalls the operating system.  This will uninstall any third party programs you have installed.  I would also suggest that you back up all of your important data on removable media, like an external hdd, flash drive, etc.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#5 Semi-Novice

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 05:57 PM

Yes, I would do a System Recovery.  This reinstalls the operating system.  This will uninstall any third party programs you have installed.  I would also suggest that you back up all of your important data on removable media, like an external hdd, flash drive, etc.

 

After a forced installation of Windows 10 nuked my laptop and two external hard drives, I created 50 billion backups on multiple drives. :wink:

 

I hope I didn't waste your time with frivolous questions. I realize I kind of answered myself. For the most part, I've always been able to resolve my own software issues, even some that were very challenging. Windows 10 has had me in a tizzy for months. The workarounds are insane! This new system had so much bloat and spyware, the memory and CPU were completely clocked out, making it useless, as well. Clearly, I made some mistakes while trying to eliminate them.

 

Even though my files were still intact, I was unable to save the laptop's OS {it was past the rollback, and all 10 files were corrupted}. I'm terrified Microsoft will turn the new system into a useless heap, causing me to miss very important deadlines. Seventy-plus families are depending on me.

 

I really appreciate your advice. I don't know if it sometimes feels as if you're spinning your wheels a bit, but, this time, your help was crucial in enabling me to move forward, if for no other reason than to help me regain my confidence.

 

THANK YOU!  :)






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