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Fresh install of Windows 7 uses almost entire 120 Gb partition


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#1 Alchemist

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 06:22 PM

Installing Windows 7 pro on a relatively new computer, I have used the "rollup" to get more-or-less up-to-date and noticed as it was installing that the disk was nearly full. 110 out of 120 Gb used. This makes no sense, as the Windows directory is only 15 Gb. I have copied some games onto the drive, but those are only another 30 Gb. Everything else currently installed is negligible, only a few more Gb. I should have over half of the disk still free. I run a utility called TreeSize and it shows 57 Gb of files in the root directory. That's the correct total of space used. Running chkdsk finds no problems. But there is a HUGE problem. Where did the other 53 Gb of my disk space go?



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 06:27 PM

Run the chkdsk /r command...the check.  The /r command includes a recount of free space on the partition.

 

Louis



#3 JohnC_21

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 06:34 PM

Post a screenshot of Disk Management.



#4 Alchemist

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 07:34 PM

Deleting all but the latest restore points only recovered two more Gb of space. Chkdsk /r took a long time to run, but made no difference. Still only 12 Gb free out of 120.

 

A major part of the problem has been discovered. The paging file. I didn't realize Windows is so stupid, but it creates a paging file as big as your RAM by default. The whole point of this machine was the large RAM, so I installed 32 Gb. I'm not quite ready to disable it, as that is a technically tricky issue, but I moved it to another partition. That recovered 32 Gb of space. Now WHY doesn't Windows tell you it is using your disk space for paging?

 

But that was only part of the problem. There is still 20 Gb of space being used without being reported. What ELSE does Windows do without telling you?


Edited by Alchemist, 26 December 2016 - 07:35 PM.


#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 07:42 PM

Good catch. With that much RAM I wouldn't use a Pagefile. I doubt you would ever use the full 32GB of RAM running your programs. Disabling the page file is easy. I have used this method on XP without any issues.

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/126430/htg-explains-what-is-the-windows-page-file-and-should-you-disable-it/

 

Check the amount of disk space System Restore is using.

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/5482/make-system-restore-use-less-space-in-windows-7/

 

Is the 120GB drive a SSD? 


Edited by JohnC_21, 26 December 2016 - 07:43 PM.


#6 Alchemist

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 09:44 PM

Nope, not an SSD. I am just fussy enough to want to separate the OS and applications from my data.

 

And the remaining 20 Gb discrepancy has been discovered. It's not system restore, but it is something else Windows does without telling you. Just like the paging file, the hibernation file (hiberfil.sys) is created by default and does NOT show in any Windows File Explorer settings. You have to open the command window and use dir switches to see it. As with the paging file, it's based on RAM size, so it's huge on a 32Gb system. Fortunately, it can be removed.

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/15140/what-is-hiberfil.sys-and-how-do-i-delete-it/

 

So, that looks like the causes of my weird shortage of disk space. Something to remember in the future.



#7 shadow_647

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 09:51 PM

Same i have the max amout of ram for winXP and my swap/page file is dissabled, when you have piles of ram you don't need that topic anymore.



#8 Condobloke

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 10:09 PM

 But there is a HUGE problem. Where did the other 53 Gb of my disk space go? What ELSE does Windows do without telling you?

 

Just wait till you get to windows 10.

 

Then again....win 7 also has 'dramas' galore......

 

 

When in doubt....there is  Linux.

 

simple

effective

Free


Condobloke ...Outback Australian  fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

“A man travels the world in search of what he needs and returns home to find it."

It has been said that time heals all wounds. I don't agree. The wounds remain. Time - the mind, protecting its sanity - covers them with some scar tissue and the pain lessens, but it is never gone. Rose Kennedy

 GcnI1aH.jpg

 

 


#9 shadow_647

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 10:34 PM

ya i know, windows has all ways bin bloatware, newest version of Linux mint uses about the same amount of space and ram as winXP, newer versions of windows its just sad, saw one guy in the forum the other day that was like "computer slow win10 don't know why" so i asked him to give me a screen shot of what was going on processes wise and know what ?

150~200 processes going all the at the same with some bad malware in the mix too, saw that and i was like

 

facepalm.jpg

 

In winXP atm im at like the 30 processes mark or so with everything installed and runing.


Edited by shadow_647, 26 December 2016 - 10:35 PM.


#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 10:42 PM

Nope, not an SSD. I am just fussy enough to want to separate the OS and applications from my data.

 

And the remaining 20 Gb discrepancy has been discovered. It's not system restore, but it is something else Windows does without telling you. Just like the paging file, the hibernation file (hiberfil.sys) is created by default and does NOT show in any Windows File Explorer settings. You have to open the command window and use dir switches to see it. As with the paging file, it's based on RAM size, so it's huge on a 32Gb system. Fortunately, it can be removed.

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/15140/what-is-hiberfil.sys-and-how-do-i-delete-it/

 

So, that looks like the causes of my weird shortage of disk space. Something to remember in the future.

I completely forgot about that hibernation file. I don't have it on my Windows 7 system but I didn't know the size changed depending on RAM. I refuse to use hibernation. It can cause problems with attached external drives.

 

https://hardforum.com/threads/warning-external-drives-and-hibernate.1345435/

 

http://forums.overclockers.co.uk/showthread.php?p=9098378



#11 shadow_647

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 10:51 PM

Never use hibernation my self, if my computer up and running that means its doing something like downloading, screen might power down or ill manually turn it off but if the system up and running there's a reason for it, if not i just turn the thing off.

 

Ps: ya hard forum, i like that place. you to be active in their all the time, really smart people in that forum when it comes to computers and i like the places red & black colors.



#12 Platypus

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 11:37 PM

This is all normal and sensible, nothing stupid about it. It's determined by how computers work running in protected mode (i.e since the 386 CPU), not the OS being used. Different OSs can change their approach, e.g. Linux using a swap partition, but if you have the facility it uses the space.

 

The paging file defaults to at least the size of the system RAM, as it is where a full memory dump will be placed for later fault analysis if there is a crash. The page file is used because its absolute address is known to Windows and can be written to outside of the operation of the file system. Anyone who doesn't want a page file can turn it off (or shrink it), at the expense of not being able to get a full crash dump, which is not a problem for most people.

 

Hibernating a computer involves storing the contents of memory in a file. It has to be a single contiguous file to store the image of the VM, and likewise if you do not hibernate the system (like John_C, I consider it best not to) turn it off and reclaim the space.


Edited by Platypus, 26 December 2016 - 11:39 PM.

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#13 NickAu

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 03:12 PM

 

Different OSs can change their approach, e.g. Linux using a swap partition, but if you have the facility it uses the space.

Yes, during a default install  Buntu based Linux creates a swap partition equal to the amount of ram you have, so if you have 16 GiB of ram you end up with a 16 GiB swap unless you tell the installer otherwise.



#14 Alchemist

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 03:56 PM

 

 But there is a HUGE problem. Where did the other 53 Gb of my disk space go? What ELSE does Windows do without telling you?

 

Just wait till you get to windows 10.

 

Then again....win 7 also has 'dramas' galore......

 

 

When in doubt....there is  Linux.

 

simple

effective

Free

 

I have a copy of Windows 10 Educational Edition to install on this same machine. Using a different HD! I am not letting Win 10 touch my personal info. This will be for learning and practicing only. Apparently the educational version does not include Cortana, but does include the Enterprise level controls on things like updates. So fewer useless processes running in the background, and more control (though still not total control) over when it changes the OS under you. Sounds like the best version of Win 10 you can get, unless MS has made something custom for a corporate or government customer.

 

And yes, I've already been using Linux for a number of years. But there are too many situations that "require" MS Office to just abandon Windows entirely. Yet...


Edited by Alchemist, 29 December 2016 - 03:57 PM.


#15 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 09:51 PM

Treesize Free will tell you what is hogging all the space:

http://www.jam-software.com/freeware/






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