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why not making every partition primary


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#1 seraphin

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 12:45 PM

I've read about the differences between primary v logical partition but have yet found any explanations (or just missed it) on why we should NOT make every partition primary.

 

I recently got a 1TB HD from an abandoned old desktop, reformatted it and made a clone of a 250 GB HD from a laptop into the 1TB HD. I then needed to create a new partition for the remaining unallocated 750 GB and when doing so, I was prompted with the question of making the partition logical or primary.

 

What's the "advantage" of making the partition logical ???



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 01:09 PM

If you plan on only having 4 partitions on the disk then you can make them primary. You create logical partitions inside an extended partition if you are intending on having more than 4 partitions on the disk. This is a way of avoiding the 4 primary partition limit on a MBR disk.  You would be allowed 3 primary partitions and one extended partition with logical partitions inside the extended partition. Or you could have one primary and one extended with logical volumes in the extended.

 

 A GPT disk can have up to 128 primary partitions but sometimes GPT disks don't play well with the old legacy BIOSs. Technically you would only be able to use 26 partitions because of the letters in the alphabet. After that you would be using Volume IDs which is a kind of a kludge. 

 

Personally on a MBR disk I make all partitions primary unless I intend to have more than 4.


Edited by JohnC_21, 21 December 2016 - 01:26 PM.


#3 RolandJS

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 07:51 PM

JohnC, I thought it's best to only have the OS partition marked Primary, and the other partitions remain Logical.  So, that is old school thinking on my part?  :)


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#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 02:50 PM

Some people prefer your method but I never had a problem using only primaries if less than 4. GPT disks don't have primary/extended partition though I guess you could day every partition on a GPT disk is considered primary. On an external MBR disk I rarely have more than two partitions.

GPT replaces the clunky old MBR partitioning system with something more modern. It’s called GUID Partition Table because every partition on your drive has a “globally unique identifier,” or GUID — a random string so long that every GPT partition on earth likely has its own unique identifier.

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/193669/whats-the-difference-between-gpt-and-mbr-when-partitioning-a-drive/






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