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what will Microsoft do? Upgrading 32 to 64bit win7 after new CPU upgrade.


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#1 LIOTB

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 02:36 AM

Hello!

 

Thank you ahead of time for your time and efforts!

 

THE QUESTION: What are the implications with microsoft in reinstalling (upgrading to 32bit to 64bit) after I install a 64bit capable processor?

 

THE STORY:

I recently installed win7 twice on the same machine. The second time as the first time there were problems with the installation. Now, I want to install a new processor that handles 64bit operations. So, after I install  the new processor I would like to switch to the 64bit version of win7, thus needing a fresh install. Worried Microsoft might invalidate the key after I do that. Before I attempted to upgrade win7, I will upgrade the RAM and the CPU.

 

Thank you again for any insight you might provide!

Warm regards,
LIOTB



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 11:28 AM

Win 7 32-bit...and Win 7 64-bit...are not intechangeable in the eyes of Microsoft.  If they were...there would be no need to denote the bit information on the licensing/proof of authenticity data used by Microsoft.

 

See comments made by MS and Newegg reps at https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-windows_install/is-a-windows-7-license-key-valid-for-both-32-bit/70d546cd-b6e3-44d8-a6c8-fd7feb7d1915?page=3 .

 

Louis



#3 LIOTB

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 03:22 PM

Win 7 32-bit...and Win 7 64-bit...are not intechangeable in the eyes of Microsoft.  If they were...there would be no need to denote the bit information on the licensing/proof of authenticity data used by Microsoft.

 

See comments made by MS and Newegg reps at https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-windows_install/is-a-windows-7-license-key-valid-for-both-32-bit/70d546cd-b6e3-44d8-a6c8-fd7feb7d1915?page=3 .

 

Louis

 

Thank you for the insight, Luise and for taking you time on Sunday for a bit of service. 

 

Oh, I see, I feel silly now as I knew that. My concern was secondary to the point of needing to purchase 64 bit anyway. It is interesting though how some claim that they used there 32 key for a 64 installation. 

 

I appreciate your time Louis,

 

Merry Christmas,

Aaron



#4 hamluis

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Posted 18 December 2016 - 03:54 PM

Well...people claim this and that...but Microsoft says that there is no legal way to accomplish what some describe.  As a matter of policy, we do not advise on the illegal approaches to computing that others may cater to or devise.  The Forum Rules...link in my signature...preclude that.

 

Louis



#5 LIOTB

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 04:01 AM

Well...people claim this and that...but Microsoft says that there is no legal way to accomplish what some describe.  As a matter of policy, we do not advise on the illegal approaches to computing that others may cater to or devise.  The Forum Rules...link in my signature...preclude that.

 

Louis

Hello Louis,

 

I know, it makes me wonder sometimes about people, so many nefarious people out there. My concern was registering the same key multiple times in a short period because of troubles I had had, but as I said, my concern was secondary to the fact that I would have to install a whole separate licence anyway so that solves my concern about having to reinstall on the same machine multiple times in the last couple of days (sometimes it's best to buy new and not fight with an old machine). As I said, felt silly that that has slipped my mind that I would have to purchase a 64 key which solves the multiple reinstall concern. I do the same thing when I work on my car. I get focused and tired and don't think straight then I have to make more trips to the auto store and could have had my problem solved if I had stopped for a second and just thought about it. I was really tired when I wrote my question. So, I am sorry I took up so much time and I am most grateful for it!

Most sincerely, 

Aaron



#6 Platypus

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 06:28 AM

If the Windows is a full Retail version, the same key can be used interchangeably between 32 and 64 bit, because Retail can be removed from one computer and transferred to another, and so is supplied with both 32 bit and 64 bit installation media. An old installation could be on 32 bit hardware, then that computer taken out of service and the 64 bit Windows version re-installed onto a 64 bit system using the same license, hence the same product key.

 

Windows with the cheaper OEM license is tied to only the original installation on one machine, so is installed initially as either 32 bit or 64 bit and the installation is then only valid for that configuration on that machine.


Edited by Platypus, 19 December 2016 - 06:33 AM.

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#7 LIOTB

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 06:51 AM

If the Windows is a full Retail version, the same key can be used interchangeably between 32 and 64 bit, because Retail can be removed from one computer and transferred to another, and so is supplied with both 32 bit and 64 bit installation media. An old installation could be on 32 bit hardware, then that computer taken out of service and the 64 bit Windows version re-installed onto a 64 bit system using the same license, hence the same product key.

 

Windows with the cheaper OEM license is tied to only the original installation on one machine, so is installed initially as either 32 bit or 64 bit and the installation is then only valid for that configuration on that machine.

Hello Platypus,

 

thank you for the clarification, that really helps and takes off the stress. So, I am in luck then, this is a boxed version not an oem version.

 

Thank you for taking the time!

Aaron



#8 hamluis

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 07:03 AM

Just a clarification...System Builder versions are "boxed" but they are not retail versions.  The data provided with the install disk re the license...will guide you.

 

Louis



#9 LIOTB

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 12:46 PM

Just a clarification...System Builder versions are "boxed" but they are not retail versions.  The data provided with the install disk re the license...will guide you.

 

Louis

Oh, thank you for the semantic clarification. I didn't realize the jargon. It's a retail version then. Sounds good thank you. As always read the instructions. 

 

Thanks!






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