Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Freeware -vs- Fee Paid


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 RaulMcCai

RaulMcCai

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 17 December 2016 - 05:54 PM

I'm have a thread where I'm asking for help.    I am directed to a plethora of freeware ( mind you I haven't a clue about any of this) SO I'm down loading and scanning and I wondered - Hasn't any  company figured out how to do a one stop shopping deal to incorporate all the  various root and boot kits and  registry bugs and what all?

 

Or stated another way is there a decent product that can do all the stuff the freeware is doing in one package?

 

 

 



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Captain_Chicken

Captain_Chicken

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,369 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 17 December 2016 - 06:39 PM

There is no one easy solution to PC malware. I would recommend malwarebytes 3.0 and avast anti virus.

Computer Collection:

Spoiler

Spoiler

Spoiler

Spoiler

#3 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,953 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 17 December 2016 - 08:32 PM

No single product is 100% foolproof and can prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time.

#2. Infection State...no single anti-malware engine can provide protection against 100 percent of threats. In some cases, an engine may either fail to remove a threat that is detected or fail to detect a threat completely.

4 Things to Consider When Assessing Device Posture for Effective Network Access Control
The complexity of finding, preventing, and cleanup from malware

 

The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear and it takes time for new malware to be reported, samples collected, analyzed, and tested by anti-virus/anti-malware researchers before they can add a new threat to database definitions. Further, if you're dealing with zero-day malware it's unlikely the anti-virus is going to detect anything. Malware writers have the advantage since no matter how hard security vendors attempt to stay on top of new threats, there is always a short time-frame in which a new malicious file goes undetected and can infect a computer without detection. Just because one anti-virus or anti-malware scanner detected threats that another missed, does not mean its more effective.

 

Every security vendor's lab uses different scanning engines and different detection methods. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses and they often use a mix of technologies to detect and remove malware. Scanning engines may use Heuristic Analysis, Behavioral Analysis, Sandboxing and Signature file detection (containing the binary patterns of known virus signatures) which can account for discrepancies in scanning outcomes. Depending on how often the anti-virus or anti-malware database is updated can also account for differences in threat detections. Further, each vendor has its own definition (naming standards) of what constitutes malware and scanning your computer using different criteria will yield different results. The fact that each program has its own definition files means that some malware may be picked up by one that could be missed by another.

When receiving assistance with malware removal at sites like Bleeping Computer, Helpers will usually ask you to download a variety of free tools ...some for diagnostics, some for disinfection. In most cases, using the free tools is sufficient to clean the malware so why ask anyone to download a product you have to pay for and may not need afterwards.

Both free and paid for products typically use the same scanning engine, detection and removal methods when in comes to malware disinfection. The primary benefit of paid for anti-virus or anti-malware products is that most of them offer additional features such as real-time protection against malware infection and free technical support. In contrast, free versions are limited...typically used as stand-alone scanners or to provide some behind the scene protection.


.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif

#4 RaulMcCai

RaulMcCai
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 15 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 18 December 2016 - 11:45 AM

Thoughtful replies.  

So  tell me ( if it's possible to convey to such a thing to a layman)   I've wondered about this for ages.

Take Microsoft updates, the Adobe updates  and freeware. One would imagine that they'd be like the Shangrila  land of the highest glory for a hacker.

Plus the amount of trouble one could cause would, I should think, attract them like flies to wet stinking feces

 

How does one keep freeware and updates from being hacked  by someone wanting to  be the Man in the middle?



#5 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,953 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:10:41 AM

Posted 18 December 2016 - 02:03 PM

Older versions of a lot of popular software such as Adobe (Acrobat Reader, Flash Player, Shockwave Player), Java, Windows Media Player, VLC Player, Web Browsers are vulnerable to exploits and should be kept updated. There are serious security issues with older versions which can increase the risk of system infection. Infections spread by malware writers and attackers exploiting unpatched security holes or vulnerabilities in older versions. Software applications are a favored target of malware writers who continue to exploit coding and design vulnerabilities with increasing aggressiveness.

Exploit kits are a type of malicious toolkit used to exploit security holes found in software applications...for the purpose of spreading malware. These kits come with pre-written exploit code and target users running insecure or outdated software applications on their computers.

Tools of the Trade: Exploit Kits

The majority of computers get infected from visiting a specially crafted webpage that exploits one or multiple software vulnerabilities. It could be by clicking a link within an email or simply browsing the net, and it happens silently without any user interaction whatsoever.

Web ExploitsAnti-virus and Anti-malware solutions with anti-exploitation features protect against zero-day malware, drive-by downloads, exploits and Exploit Kits.Some anti-virus programs include built-in exploit protection. For example, Emsisoft Anti-Malware uses advanced behavior blocking analysis which is extremely difficult to penetrate...it continually monitors the behavior of all active programs looking for any anomalies that may be indicative of malicious activity and raises an alert as soon as something suspicious occurs. This advanced behavior blocking technology is able to detect unknown zero-day attacks, file-less malware that resides only in memory, zombies (the hijacking of host processes to load malicious code which execute via script parser programs), and file-encrypting malware (ransomware) attacks.

ESET Antivirus and Smart Security uses a Host-based Intrusion Prevention System (HIPS) to monitor system activity and uses a pre-defined set of rules to recognize suspicious system behavior. When this type of activity is identified, HIPS stops the offending program from carrying out potentially harmful activity. ESET Antivirus (and Smart Security) includes Exploit Blocker which is designed to fortify applications that are often exploited (i.e. web browsers, PDF readers, email clients, MS Office components). This feature monitors the behavior of processes, looks for and blocks suspicious activities that are typical for exploits including zero-day attacks. ESET's Java Exploit Blocker looks for and blocks attempts to exploit vulnerabilities in Java. ESET Antivirus (and Smart Security) also includes script-based attack protection which protects against javascript in web browsers and Antimalware Scan Interface (AMSI) protection against scripts that try to exploit Windows PowerShell.

If your software (version) is current and up-to-date, risk would be minimal until the next wave of exploits and vulnerabilities are discovered. The more crucial problem is that many folks just do not think about keeping their installed software up-to-date. Education is the key and why we refer members to this topic: How to detect vulnerable and out-dated programs using Secunia Personal Software Inspector
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users