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my current 2GB (x2) SO-DIMM's are 1.5 V , Can I upgrade Using 1.3 V new modules?


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#1 jcrr1985

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 11:49 AM

Hello. I havea doubt, and it is ¿How to know if my motheboard accept/support "X" or "Y" Memory? Actually, my laptop is using 2 memory modules PC-10600 / DDR3-1333Mhz, and CPU-Z says they consume 1.5 V. I want to upgrade and I saw a couple Crucial Memory modules with this specs: PC-12800 / 1600 Mhz., but tthe lable says "1.3 V".  ¿If I buy and install them, will my laptop have troubles? (from not turning on to damaging the memories, the memories slots or even damaging the whole the motherboard?

 

I have always had the eternal doubt of:  "How to know if certain memory can be recognized by my laptop, without causing problems".

 

 

I will attach in this post a screenshot of what the SPD label of CPU-Z shows about my memory modules

 

(I apologise for my akward and bad english!)  

 

I would greatly appreciate any suggestion. Thank you guys.


Edited by hamluis, 16 December 2016 - 12:22 PM.
Moved from W10 Spt to Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 shadow_647

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Posted 17 December 2016 - 12:01 AM

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/forum-7/announcement-46-please-provide-system-specifications-when-posting-a-problem/



#3 jcrr1985

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Posted 17 December 2016 - 10:12 AM

My laptop is a Dell inspiron N5010 (model 0WXY9J)

Processor: Intel Core i3 370M. @2.40GHz, 2.39GHz
Memoria instalada 4GB (2x2Gb)

Sistema Operativo de 64 bits, Procesador x64

OS: Windows 10

 

I Hope you can help me solve the issue :)

 

Arigato.



#4 dc3

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Posted 17 December 2016 - 11:35 AM

You have a computer which is capable of running in dual channel.  Dual channel  shortens the throughput time by about half effectively making the RAM twice as fast.  In order to run dual channel you need to have matched modules.  This is why RAM manufacturers sell matched pairs.

 

The modules you posted are different speeds.  With mixed speed the faster module will underclock to the speed of the slower module.

 

Using matched modules resolves the problems which can occur with mixed voltages.


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#5 Nightspear

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 12:15 AM

I agree with dc3. it is best to run with a matching set. You get away with the slower ram working but it cause problems. try to at least match the speed and type of ram when you upgrade. E.G. you are currently running 2x 2GB PC-10600 / DDR3-1333Mhz   it is ok to swap out for  2x 4GB PC-10600 / DDR3-1333Mhz

 

What crucial.com recommends

http://www.crucial.com/usa/en/compatible-upgrade-for/Dell/inspiron-n5010#memoryResults 



#6 dc3

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 08:39 AM

@Nightspear

 

It would be a lot easier to simply get the RAM model and product number from the Speccy (if the op ever posts it) and find another matching module.  Mix in RAM modules in dual channel usually doesn't end well.  This is why I suggest purchasing what is already installed, that and it is a lot less expensive than purchase two modules rather than one.


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#7 Nightspear

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Posted 29 December 2016 - 11:46 AM

@dc3

 

I totally agree. That is why I went to crucial. OP gave us make and model of their pc. I plugged that in the adviser tool and got the results of the compatible ram they sell. Now OP has to find out what their pc maxes out at. It will be pointless to buy 16GB of ram if your pc can only utilize 6GB. In my experience, PC's bought now days can double the ram that is pre-installed. Unless they have a custom build or custom ordered.






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