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Replacing motherboard and other parts


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#1 KDDomin

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 10:33 AM

Soon I am replacing my current motherboard ( Gigabytw A88X FM2 ) with a new, better one ( ASUS Z170 E ). I am also replacing my GPU (GTX 960) with a GTX 1070, CPU (AMD A8 7650K) with the i7 6700k, RAM (from DDR3 to DDR4), PSU (from 500W to 650W), and my CPU cooler (to the Cooler Master hyper 212 EVO).

 

I just need to know anything that is important or just the basics on replacing my motherboard. This is my first time so I just need some advise.

Any help would be greatful, Thanks.

 

*All parts already purchased* 


Edited by KDDomin, 16 December 2016 - 02:35 PM.
Moved from System Building to Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 Drillingmachine

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 11:10 AM

Other parts are?

 

That "upgrade" does not make sense IMO. You are switching from quad core to quad core, adding new memory that does not give any advantage and difference between old and new GPU is not groundbreaking enough to justify cost. Also you probably don't need new PSU.



#3 hamluis

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 11:22 AM

The basics on replacing a motherboard, IMO...possibly new RAM (determined by the board), possibly new Windows install and license.  MS considers a change of motherboard to be a new system.

 

What is it that you hope to gain by changing the mentioned components?  What is the expected end result?  Or is it just change for the sake of change (which is OK as long as you are using your money :) )?

 

Louis



#4 KDDomin

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 02:28 PM

Other parts are?

 

That "upgrade" does not make sense IMO. You are switching from quad core to quad core, adding new memory that does not give any advantage and difference between old and new GPU is not groundbreaking enough to justify cost. Also you probably don't need new PSU.

Well for one, did you not read the entire description? Those are all the parts im replacing. Two, the 6700k is WAYYY better than my current CPU. Three, going from 4 Gigs if RAM to 16. Four, I got the 1070 for $350 on black friday which is an AMAZING deal for how good it is. And lastly the new PSU is precaution for future upgrades. I should have also mentioned, I already have all the parts. I did not ask for advice how i should spend my money, only on how to handle the process of taking out the motherboard etc  and replacing it with a new one. :)



#5 KDDomin

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 02:32 PM

The basics on replacing a motherboard, IMO...possibly new RAM (determined by the board), possibly new Windows install and license.  MS considers a change of motherboard to be a new system.

 

What is it that you hope to gain by changing the mentioned components?  What is the expected end result?  Or is it just change for the sake of change (which is OK as long as you are using your money :) )?

 

Louis

I did get new RAM and I am aware of the Windows thing. I have a retail disk for Windows 10 ready to go. And for a result, to actually be ablr to play the video games I have at higher than 10 fps. Thanks. Also, do I have to worry about any of my current drivers or will taking out the old parts diminish them, then i can install the new ones? How does that work? Sorry, its my first time.



#6 Drillingmachine

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 03:44 PM

Well for one, did you not read the entire description? Those are all the parts im replacing. Two, the 6700k is WAYYY better than my current CPU. Three, going from 4 Gigs if RAM to 16. Four, I got the 1070 for $350 on black friday which is an AMAZING deal for how good it is. And lastly the new PSU is precaution for future upgrades. I should have also mentioned, I already have all the parts. I did not ask for advice how i should spend my money, only on how to handle the process of taking out the motherboard etc  and replacing it with a new one. :)


Those are parts you are replacing but also other parts (like case) may mean something that must be considered. As parts are already bought, discussion about them takes us nowhere.

For replacing those parts, there's nothing too hard. Basically it goes like this. Take PSU cables, SATA cables, case connectors and video card etc off your current motherboard and remove it. I expect both are ATX motherboards and case is ATX. So motherboard standoffs SHOULD be OK (same amount on same places, no standoff should touch motherboard PCB, check it anyway). Before putting motherboard on case, put CPU on place. And beware, socket pins are very fragile (also pray that pins are OK out of the box). Install memory before cooler. If your case has no cut off behind motherboard for CPU cooler install (I asked for other parts...), install CPU cooler before putting motherboard in place. If yes, then you may put motherboard in place first. Use screws to keep it in place.

Now motherboard and parts are in place. Put everything like SATA cables, case connectors power connectors, video card etc back on place and you're ready.

Edited by Drillingmachine, 16 December 2016 - 03:45 PM.


#7 hamluis

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 03:45 PM

Well...first thing is that you have a motherboard and with that board comes a drivers disk.  That will take care of any drivers that need to be installed and which Windows will not install automatically.

 

Between the installation of the new motherboard....very simple, using a screwdriver...and then installing Windows (with appropriate activation...and then running the drivers disk which comes with the motherboard...it's all simple.

 

First thing...read the motherboard installation manual/guide which comes with the board.  It will lay out everything on the board in detail.  It helps to find out where your control panel connectors, RAM slots, and PSU connectors should be, before you start trying to attach them.

 

I find making the front panel connections to be the hardest part of installing a motherboard and it's really not hard at all...it's one of those things that, once you've done it, you know.

 

Installing the CPU/fan/heatsink...can be irritating but just follow the instructions provided with the CPU.

 

Make sure RAM modules are firmly seated properly.

 

Make sure that the PSU switch at the rear...is in the ON position.  Make sure that both PSU motherboard connections have been made properly.

 

One thing...remove your old hard drive from the system before you begin a new install...the old drive serves no purpose and could only be a possible item of confusion during any install of Windows.

 

Asus boards come with what I consider to be an excess amount of junk on their install disks.  I suggest you ignore most of the flaky stuff and only go with the basic driver installs...you can install anything else from that disk once Windows is properly set up.

 

There are tons of guides covering new installs, new motherboards, etc...if you have any doubts, use Google to get a visual aid or a guide of some sort.

 

Just take your time...do a step at a time...you'll get it done :).

 

Louis



#8 KDDomin

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 03:53 PM

 

Well for one, did you not read the entire description? Those are all the parts im replacing. Two, the 6700k is WAYYY better than my current CPU. Three, going from 4 Gigs if RAM to 16. Four, I got the 1070 for $350 on black friday which is an AMAZING deal for how good it is. And lastly the new PSU is precaution for future upgrades. I should have also mentioned, I already have all the parts. I did not ask for advice how i should spend my money, only on how to handle the process of taking out the motherboard etc  and replacing it with a new one. :)


Those are parts you are replacing but also other parts (like case) may mean something that must be considered. As parts are already bought, discussion about them takes us nowhere.

For replacing those parts, there's nothing too hard. Basically it goes like this. Take PSU cables, SATA cables, case connectors and video card etc off your current motherboard and remove it. I expect both are ATX motherboards and case is ATX. So motherboard standoffs SHOULD be OK (same amount on same places, no standoff should touch motherboard PCB, check it anyway). Before putting motherboard on case, put CPU on place. And beware, socket pins are very fragile (also pray that pins are OK out of the box). Install memory before cooler. If your case has no cut off behind motherboard for CPU cooler install (I asked for other parts...), install CPU cooler before putting motherboard in place. If yes, then you may put motherboard in place first. Use screws to keep it in place.

Now motherboard and parts are in place. Put everything like SATA cables, case connectors power connectors, video card etc back on place and you're ready.

 

Ok thank you so much for the help!



#9 KDDomin

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 04:00 PM

Well...first thing is that you have a motherboard and with that board comes a drivers disk.  That will take care of any drivers that need to be installed and which Windows will not install automatically.

 

Between the installation of the new motherboard....very simple, using a screwdriver...and then installing Windows (with appropriate activation...and then running the drivers disk which comes with the motherboard...it's all simple.

 

First thing...read the motherboard installation manual/guide which comes with the board.  It will lay out everything on the board in detail.  It helps to find out where your control panel connectors, RAM slots, and PSU connectors should be, before you start trying to attach them.

 

I find making the front panel connections to be the hardest part of installing a motherboard and it's really not hard at all...it's one of those things that, once you've done it, you know.

 

Installing the CPU/fan/heatsink...can be irritating but just follow the instructions provided with the CPU.

 

Make sure RAM modules are firmly seated properly.

 

Make sure that the PSU switch at the rear...is in the ON position.  Make sure that both PSU motherboard connections have been made properly.

 

One thing...remove your old hard drive from the system before you begin a new install...the old drive serves no purpose and could only be a possible item of confusion during any install of Windows.

 

Asus boards come with what I consider to be an excess amount of junk on their install disks.  I suggest you ignore most of the flaky stuff and only go with the basic driver installs...you can install anything else from that disk once Windows is properly set up.

 

There are tons of guides covering new installs, new motherboards, etc...if you have any doubts, use Google to get a visual aid or a guide of some sort.

 

Just take your time...do a step at a time...you'll get it done :).

 

Louis

"One thing...remove your old hard drive from the system before you begin a new install...the old drive serves no purpose and could only be a possible item of confusion during any install of Windows." When you say this, what do you mean? Like physically remove the HdD? I did not buy a new HDD, still am going to use the 1TB one I have. Sorry im kinda confused.



#10 Drillingmachine

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 04:02 PM

Unplug HDD (either unplug SATA data cable or SATA power cable or both), install Windows on SSD, shut down computer, plug SATA data cable or SATA power cable or both and make sure that first boot drive is SSD.

#11 KDDomin

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 04:21 PM

Unplug HDD (either unplug SATA data cable or SATA power cable or both), install Windows on SSD, shut down computer, plug SATA data cable or SATA power cable or both and make sure that first boot drive is SSD.

I dont have an SSD drive.



#12 Drillingmachine

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 04:41 PM

Oh yeah, that's good topic for another discussion :devil:

 

You seem to have only one HDD, in that case forgot what I said on last post.



#13 KDDomin

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 04:44 PM

Oh yeah, that's good topic for another discussion :devil:

 

You seem to have only one HDD, in that case forgot what I said on last post.

So I dont have to worry about removing my hard drive at all?



#14 hamluis

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 05:20 PM

No, don't remove if you only have a single drive :).

 

I thought that you mentioned using a SSD as your boot drive.  That would make the !TB drive nothing but storage.  No matter, the install process using a Windows DVD or whatever is the same...select space, partition it, installation begins of Windows files into memory/hard drive.

 

I make mistakes :).

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 16 December 2016 - 05:21 PM.





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