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Services to remove from Win XP


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#1 Solarium

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Posted 15 December 2016 - 12:23 AM

Hi all!
I'm choosing the components to remove from my cd (Win XP Pro) and in the services section of nLite there are 4 which I don't know whether taking out.
First, a red component, HTTP SSL: considering that I'm not going to use Internet Explorer, is it safe to remove it even if I use SSL for e-mail or other services?
Second, another red component, SNMP: there is a generic reference to printer support and agents that monitor the activity in network devices and report to the network console workstation. Does it have something to do with router connection, USB devices for connecting to the local router or stuff like that? If wireless printing support (or USB printing) is needed, can SNMP be safely removed anyway?
Third, a black component, Network DDE: does its removal affect the local router connection and security issues?
Fourth, another black component, QoS RSVP (and related QoS): does it have something to do with internet USB keys (such as dLink) for router connection (or HSDPA connection)? If so, should I keep it?

 

Following the full list of components in Services section:

 

Alerter
Application Layer Gateway
Automatic Updates
Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS)
Beep Driver
COM+
DHCP Client 

Distributed Link Tracking Client
Distributed Transaction Coordinator (DTC)
DNS Client
Error Reporting
Event Log
Extensible Authentication Protocol Service
Fax Services
Health Key and Certificate Management Service
HTTP SSL
Imapi CD burning COM Services
Indexing Service
Internet Authentication (IAS)
IPSEC Policy Agent
Kerberos Key Distribution Center
Message Queuing

Messenger
Net Logon
Network Access Protection (NAP)
Network DDE
Network Location Awareness (NLA)
Network Provisioning
Performance Logs and Alerts
Protected Storage

QoS RSVP and Quality of Service
Remote Registry
Removable Storage
Route Listening Servise
RPC Locator
Secondary Logon
Service Advertising Protocol
Shell Services
Simple TCP/IP Services
SNMP
System Event Notification (SENS)
System Monitor

System Restore
Task Scheduler
TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper
Telnet Server
Terminal Services
Text Services Framework

Uninterruptible Power Supply
Universal Plug and Play 
Volume Shadow Copy
WebClient
Windows Firewall/Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)
Windows Management Instrumentation

Windows Time
Wired AutoConfig
Wireless Configuration


Lastly, this is my list of components to remove: Alerter, Application Layer Gateway, Distributed Link Tracking Client, Error Reporting, IMAPI CD burning com services, Indexing Services, Messenger, QoS RSVP, Remote Registry, Removable Storage, Service Advertising Protocol, TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper, Telnet, Text Services Framework, Volume Shadow Copy.
Since I use a router connection (sometimes a HSDPA key), do you think that removal of any of the components of my list would badly affect my internet connection?

Do you think I could include something else on my components list, something absolutely unuseful that I missed at first sight?



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#2 shadow_647

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Posted 15 December 2016 - 02:14 AM

Guess this just turned in to a lockdown gide, if you going down that road this is usefull too.

 

Even after you disable local file and print sharing, Windows XP still leaves port 445 open and listening for incoming connections. If you are not using local networking, this can pose a security risk. To close this port you need to make a quick change to an entry in the Windows registry.

NOTE: It is very important that if you do not feel comfortable editing the registry or have never done it before that you avoid doing this right away and learn more about the Windows registry. Changing the wrong setting or changing a setting incorrectly can cause Windows to not function correctly.

Please be advised that Vectro Security takes no responsibility for any damage caused to the operating system.

Here are the step-by-step instructions to close port 445 in Windows XP:

   1. Click "Start"
   2. Click "Run..."
   3. Where it says "Open:" type "regedit"
   4. Navigate to HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\NetBT\Parameters
   5. Find the value "TransportBindName" and right-click it to open up a menu of options.
   6. Click "Modify" (it is in bold text)
   7. Where it says "Value data:" delete whatever is in the box so the box is blank. The blank entry is what closes the port.
   8. Click "OK"
   9. Close the registry and reboot.
----------------------------------------------
That takes care of it, now you are much safer from other machines on your local network, or if you are plugged into a cable modem without a router.
To disable Port 445:

Add the following registry key:

Key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\NetBT\Parameters
Name: SMBDeviceEnabled
Type: DWORD (REG_DWORD)
Data: 0

Don’t forget to restart your computer after disabling the above ports for effect. Also, to check that those ports are disabled, you can open a command prompt and type netstat -an to confirm that your computer is no longer listening to those ports.

----------------------------------------

To disable Port 135 (step 4 is not necessary):
http://www.pimp-my-rig.com/2008/10/faq-disable-port-135-disable-dcom.html

[1] Start by launching the registry editor.
Start » Run » regedit.

[2] Navigate over to key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\OLE

At the right column, locate the value "EnableDCOM" and modify the value to "N"

[3] Navigate to this registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\RPC

Right click on & Modify the value named "DCOM Protocols" Under the key "Value Data", you will see values. These values keep port 135 open. Highlight everything listed and delete all existing data. Doing so gives "DCOM Protocols" blank data which will in turn close down port 135.

ncacn_ip_tcp
ncacn_spx
ncacn_nb_nb
ncacn_nb_ipx

dissable ipsec to close port 500~4500 winxp sp3

 

_____________________________________

 

Prevent Local Administrators from Turning Windows Firewall On or Off

Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2

This procedure is useful if you want to prevent local administrators from turning Windows Firewall on or off.

Administrative Credentials

To perform this procedure, you must be a member of the Administrators group on the local computer, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority. If the computer is joined to a domain, members of the Domain Admins group might be able to perform this procedure.

Special Considerations

You can configure Windows Firewall settings in the standard profile or the domain profile. The domain profile is used when a computer is connected to a network in which the computer's domain account resides. The standard profile is used when a computer is connected to a network in which the computer's domain account does not reside, such as a public network or the Internet. Make sure Windows Firewall is using the correct profile when you perform this procedure.

For more information about Windows Firewall profiles, see Managing Windows Firewall Profiles.

You should verify scope settings for any exceptions that you change. For more information about scope settings, see Configuring Scope Settings.

To prevent local administrators from turning Windows Firewall on or off

This procedure can be performed using Group Policy. You cannot perform this procedure from the command prompt with the netsh firewall command or in the graphical user interface with Windows Firewall in Control Panel.

Using Group Policy

To prevent local administrators from turning Windows Firewall on or off

  1. Open the Group Policy Object Editor snap-in to edit the Group Policy object (GPO) that is used to manage Windows Firewall settings in your organization.

  2. Open Computer Configuration, open Administrative Templates, open Network, open Network Connections, open Windows Firewall, and then open either Domain Profile or Standard Profile, depending on which profile you want to configure.

  3. In the details pane, double-click Windows Firewall: Protect all network connections.

  4. Do the following if you want to turn off Windows Firewall and prevent local administrators from turning on Windows Firewall:

    In the Windows Firewall: Protect all network connections properties dialog box, on the Settings tab, click Disabled, and then click OK.

  5. Do the following if you want to turn on Windows Firewall and prevent local administrators from turning off Windows Firewall:

    In the Windows Firewall: Protect all network connections properties dialog box, on the Settings tab, click Enabled, and then click OK.

Notes

  • Windows Firewall is not included in the original release of the Windows Server 2003 operating systems.
     
  • Group Policy settings must be refreshed before they take effect.

----------------------------------------------------------

 

Take a copy of this as well, works in tandom with most firewalls including the winXP buit in firewall.


http://www.filseclab.com/eng/products/firewall.htm

 

----------------------------------------------------------

 

To lock it down more don't use admin mode "root" , setup a diffent accout and lock things down more, relly it depends how hardcore you want to go in winXP for locking things down.

 

this is usefull as well

 

http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/xp_antispy.html

 

----------------------------------------------------------

 

http://www.windowsecurity.com/articles-tutorials/windows_os_security/Windows_XP_Your_Definitive_Lockdown_Guide.html

 

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/it-security/10-services-to-turn-off-in-ms-windows-xp/

 

http://patriot-tech.com/how-to-harden-your-windows-os-for-maximum-security/?ModPagespeed=noscript

 

 

 

 

 



#3 shadow_647

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Posted 15 December 2016 - 02:38 AM

Ps: is black enabled and red disabled or the other way around ?

What colors means what, theirs all so manual mode.



#4 Solarium

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Posted 15 December 2016 - 12:49 PM

Black components are supposed to be uncritical, while red components are more critical for ensuring certain functions (more or less important) or OS stability. This is approx. how nLite program defines the difference between black and red components.
After that list there is mine, consisting of the services I would like to remove (see the last part of my first post).
Anyway, I just want to thank you for your contribution. Actually, security issue is the most important one for Win XP users, now that there's only a "side" support coming from POS Ready 2009.
So, the less options and services Win XP has, the more it will be safe.
I found your links to some articles very interesting. In particular, I would like to focus on the article from patriot-tech.com where it is well explained how to harden Windows. These are the main points:

- Adjusting retransmission of SYN-ACKS;

- Determining how many times TCP retransmits an unacknowledged data segment on an existing connection;

- Disabling ICMP Router Discovery Protocol (IRDP);

- Disabling these services:
Telnet
Universal Plug and Play Device Host
IIS (not installed by default)
Netmeeting Remote Desktop Sharing
Remote Desktop Help Session Manager
Remote Registry
Routing & Remote Access
SSDP Discovery Service
Disable any non-active accounts and delete any accounts which are no longer required
Disable Guest accounts

- Use the Local Security Policy;

- Disable Enumeration of SIDS;

- Disable File and Print Sharing;

- Disable Remote Assistance and Remote Desktop;

- Disable any unnecessary and potentially dangerous service. The three most common services to turn off are Windows Plug and Play, DCOM, and Windows Messenger;

- Encrypt the My Documents and Temp folders;

- Set account lockout policy;

- Use a BIOS and Bootlevel Password;

- Use NTFS File system;

- Disable auto-logins.


Now, have a look at the list of services strongly advised to be disabled (plus the other 3 mentioned a bit later).
What I need to know is whether it is safe to remove them without encountering issues regarding home router connection (just for having the internet connection) and plug-and-play USB devices. I mean, it would be really annoying to discover only after the removal that one (or more) of the above services is important for router connection or simply to install and use any USB flash memory or other USB devices (like scanners, printers, etc.).

Also, about disabling port 445 and 135, are they necessary for router connection and automatic updates (I let Windows download and install POS Ready updates and so far without any problem)? Is it really necessary to disable them even if I remove the above list of services?

#5 shadow_647

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Posted 15 December 2016 - 02:33 PM

Well my self i setup all network connections manual stile as well as my firewalls, all by hand, things like Upnp for networks "port 1900" i disable and for me max network defense is king, when it comes to getting hacked 90% of the time its software you get tricked in to downloading and runing , no amount of locking down or security apps will save you if you keep saying yes to install something and then the Os bombs.

 

Brute force hacking / drive by downloads are a lot harder to do, to do it you have to brake something that installed on the computer and has access to a network.

 

Flash player ~ anything adobe and java script is basically evil, Firefox only for surfing the net with lots of hardening mods is the way to go, more hardcore is dont even use HTML5 use the last versions of 4.

 

Other thing you want gone is internet explorer in winXP the thing a drive by download just waiting to happen if used.

 

When you do a "netstat -ano" on my computer theirs nothing left and nothing shows up as well i run 3 firewalls back to back in windowsXP with as well a extra IP firewall black list like app, as well as a top of the line router for home use "$250 when new" with the ability to use firewall like port blocking rules, on the router/firewall alone i can block all ports but 53,80,443 if i wanted so that the only thing the computer/network can then do is surf the net and everything besides that is blocked, sadly most malware just uses port 53,80,443 seeing as they know the ports in question are normally not blocked by the edge-firewall, the days of blocking ports to stop attacks is long gone for the most part though if you have something directly connected right to the net you can still see a lot of network noise, just spam flying around the net with lots of port scanning and connection attempts

 

As for one trick iv lured when locking down services is only do one or two at a time then test your setup,and a lot of research on each services topic, Microsoft like often to bind services that have unpleasant functions with some that you want/need or if you turn off it brakes windows, this is worse in newer versions of windows and if you go back in time less so, in windows 98 you can more or less do whatever you want with that thing.

 

When playing with services if turn things out badly and it brakes things then you have your answer and you have to remember what you did in order to fix things after the fact, why its useful to only do one or two at a time when testing your setup, takes a lot of time to do it this way but i know of no other way to do it.

 

Also, about disabling port 445 and 135, are they necessary for router connection and automatic updates (I let Windows download and install POS Ready updates and so far without any problem)? Is it really necessary to disable them even if I remove the above list of services?

 

 

As for updates for winXP, theirs ways to download all the updates manually.

 

https://techjourney.net/windows-updates-downloader-wud-224-build-875-for-download-with-no-wga-validation/

 

My self i consider all default Microsoft ports to be a high risk topic when it comes to getting hacked so iv removed them all, id watch out about anti-virus like apps too, most of late seem to be as bad as spyware, same with so much of whats out their of late on so many topics.

 

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc875824.aspx

 

 

Use a BIOS and Boot level Password; - Use NTFS File system;

 

My self i dont bother with this topic, im the only user using the computer and im not afraid about someone hacking my system if  their sitting right beside the computer, and if someone wants to brake the computer and they have physical access to the computer its just a mater of time and their in.

 

If you have roommates you don't trust or just people around when your not their that can play with your pc this topic makes more sense, as for winXP for public use i don't see the point, its a bomb no mater what you do on this topic, I was once at a Mcdonalds back in the day and for people that just wanted to surf the net they had winXP computers setup that anyone could use, what a joke.

 

I messed with one of the computer some then stopped quickly before someone saw what i was doing when i discovered i could bomb their install or do things  to it that i shouldn't have bin allowed to do even vs their  locked down winxp setup, what a joke, for a public net web browser computer just use Linux mint and your good, so much better for that kind of thing and faster to setup.

My windows drive is still a FAT32 drive 80gig btw so i can go after it in DOS/freeDOS if i want.

 

In the end for services its a lot of research, good thing winXP is old and everyone now knows how to hack it for better or worse, all comes down to who get to go first, and when it comes to messing with services "A" don't change too much too fast and "B" remember what your before settings were "C" read read read research research research lol "D" test your mods.

 

Ps: sadly in my research on the win7 topic the thing looks like a real pain to mess with and lock down and no one seems to know what their doing and or if they do their not talking.

 

http://ssj100.fullsubject.com/t181-how-to-disable-ports-135-137-139-445-windows-xp

 

WinXP SP2 = security placebo

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/09/02/winxpsp2_security_review/

 

Edit: typo fix


Edited by shadow_647, 15 December 2016 - 05:32 PM.


#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 16 December 2016 - 09:05 AM

BC does not allow links but there is a registry hack to let the computer appear as a POS machine. Security Updates til 2019. I have never had an issue with any update breaking the computer but your experience could be different.

 

Setting up a SRP can be hard but this utility takes out the headaches.

 

Nice post#2 shadow_647


Edited by JohnC_21, 16 December 2016 - 09:06 AM.


#7 shadow_647

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Posted 17 December 2016 - 12:17 AM

Tnx john, bin using winXP for years and years. 

I know how to mod it and set it up, as for services and what to disable in general i don't care about most of em cus i have 4gig ram and winXP doesn't use that much, mostly for me what i nuked services or files to make 100% shore they can never be enabled on my setup was just the problem ones, mostly anything that used the network, or has known hacks.

 

My self i think ill pass on your app though john, i don't need anything to let me know what safe or not when im installing something, i use the force and 35+ years of experience in knowing what to download and use as well i don't download much just old TV shows and movies that are 5~7 years old mostly or play really old games and i mean old, my video card is still a Geforce 6800GTX 256megs video ram, hell i can play the first far cry at 75+ fps on this card, use to have a GF9 9800GTX 512ram and i played all of crysis on that at 60fps.

 

One thing that nice about winXP like win98se atm is you can do anything you want to it, looking at how to guides for win7 depresses me, can't do anything with win7 and win8 and win10 are lost causes.



#8 Solarium

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Posted 17 December 2016 - 06:30 PM

Again, excellent post, shadow_647! And really interesting articles!

Particularly, I found it very useful the last one from theregister.co.uk where it is well explained which services use the well-known ports.

Instead of disabling them, I can directly remove the related services thanks to nLite program. The main difficulty is to locate all the dangerous services throghout the nLite sections: some of them are under Network section, others under Services and other sections. But it shouldn't be impossible to find them.

Anyway, using nLite, it would be really useful to have a "must-remove" components list as far as Win XP security is concerned. There are so many components, looking at that program, that can be removed and who knows how many of them should be absolutely removed for security reasons (over than the ones mentioned in the articles you linked). Actually I wouldn't care just about unuseful components but particularly the dangerous ones which can represent great security holes.

To be honest, it would be really hard to exactly know pros and cons of each Win XP component (there are too many). So, the only thing I can do is to remove the well-known dangerous ones, just to feel a bit more secure in the hope that browsers and app. won't expose themselves too much to vulnerabilities.

 

Let me get back to the article. Over than the services that use the dangerous ports, the article mentions other services in alphabetical order, most of which should be disabled by default.

However, there are just a few that are supposed to be disabled, followed by "About time". They are Clipbook, Network DDE, Network DDE DSDM, Routing and Remote Access,

So what does "about time" mean? Perhaps, that it's ok to leave them disabled?

And what about Routing and Remote Access? Does it have something to do with router connection?

 

 

BC does not allow links but there is a registry hack to let the computer appear as a POS machine. Security Updates til 2019. I have never had an issue with any update breaking the computer but your experience could be different.

 

Setting up a SRP can be hard but this utility takes out the headaches.

 

 

Thanks for your tips, JohnC_21!

Actually, my PC is disguised as POS Ready 2009 thanks to the registry hack. So far, no problem. I haven't noticed any malfunctiong, any missing folder and so on. No disaster has happened yet but this doesn't mean that my PC has never been hacked over the last 2-3 years (in the same period I've installed no internet security app. I've often considered it unuseful if not harmful. That's why I keep going without it). Who knows!?

As shadow_647 said, ports 53, 80 and 443 are chosen by most malwares but they are necessary to surf the net, so they cannot be blocked or disabled. And what about HDD firmware? Over than hacked smartphones, we could even have hard disks infected by viruses at firmware level (I read this in an article)!



#9 shadow_647

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Posted 17 December 2016 - 11:26 PM

And what about HDD firmware? Over than hacked smartphones, we could even have hard disks infected by viruses at firmware level (I read this in an article)!

 

 

Their some real EVIL code out their, seen it once my self first hand on my own systems or something like and it trashed like $2000~$4000 in hardware,not saying it was badbios just something that was a pro cyber weapon / bios virus, had to destroy a total of like 30 hdds.

 

http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/10/meet-badbios-the-mysterious-mac-and-pc-malware-that-jumps-airgaps/

 

https://www.webroot.com/blog/2011/09/13/mebromi-the-first-bios-rootkit-in-the-wild/

 

in the same period I've installed no internet security app. I've often considered it unuseful if not harmful.

 

same, i did years at one point with no AV in win98, atm though i use avira, thing loves to phone home though, i block it all at a firewall level.

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/634648/avira-privacy-problem/

 

Routing and Remote Access: you can turn winxp in to a router if you want with it, theirs hacks for that topic on a Reg level, theirs hack to to make winXP 32bit use more then 4 gigs ram, in fact it can use 8 gigs ram with the hack, sadly doing it gives all kinds of compatibility problems.

 

BTW: try this tweak guides is really good.

 

http://www.tweakguides.com/TGTC.html

 

Edit: content update.


Edited by shadow_647, 18 December 2016 - 01:15 AM.


#10 shadow_647

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 05:04 AM

How to Enable Windows XP Routing

http://www.wikihow.com/Enable-Windows-XP-Routing

 

 

Microsoft Windows supports PAE if booted with the appropriate option, but according to Geoff Chappell, Microsoft may limit 32-bit versions of Windows to 4 GB as a matter of its licensing policy

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_Address_Extension

 

https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-enable-pae-on-a-32-bit-windows-xp



#11 Solarium

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Posted 23 December 2016 - 11:44 PM

Good to know the PAE topic...

Actually, I just have a couple of RAM modules of.... yes, 256+256 MB, but that's ok!

Keeping open many web pages or more than one program at the same time does not help to speed up WIN XP, of course, with the scarce memory I own. That's why I prefer to avoid any antivirus app. Not only are they really unuseful but even bigger and bigger in terms of resources consumption. They slow down too much a machine with few RAM like mine.

Also, an old Pentium 4 Celeron (3.06 ghz) let me think about overclocking CPU and RAM, just for the sake of experimenting. But, according to the tweakguide you linked earlier, I'm afraid it can't be feasible.

I already have the Hyper Threading option activated and, looking at the service manual of my PC, there should be a Mobile CPU SpeedStep option in the BIOS but actually I should verify whether it is really there (I think I already checked it out in the past and that option should not be available). However, in that case, the default value should be "Auto". Maybe the CPU speed could be increased there.

RAM sticks are KINGMAX labelled, DDR-333 (MSAB62D-38KT3), PC2700 (166 Mhz). Service manual says it could be expanded up to 1 GB but I would prefer tweaking it than expanding it. I don't like wasting money on an old machine. After all, the laptop was born with 512 MB RAM and I would like to keep the same hardware forever. Then, when it's necessary to buy a new laptop, I'll have plenty of RAM (nowadays the minimum standard should be 4GB, but even 8GB and in a few years 16 or even more...).

But, again, increasing RAM speed or lowering latency should be BIOS dependent (I should check it out on BIOS settings). Otherwise, I don't know whether altering the latency of a RAM memory chip is an easy task.

At last, since my graphic card is an old ATI Mobility Radeon 9000 (64 MB) (never had any problem with that), I could even overclock it (frequency of the GPU and/or the Video RAM). Performance should then increase but I'm afraid in a very slight way, not significantly. Am I wrong?



#12 shadow_647

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Posted 24 December 2016 - 02:55 AM

Man your low on ram for a winXP setup, my self im at 4 gigs, even my win98se computer at the end their had 512ram and when i first started using winxp back in the day i had 1gig.

 

Sadly you don't know me in real life cus i have so much DDR ram in stock that we could do something on that level for cheap, id probably just give you the stuff on the house.

 

And i dont think you could overclock much on that cpu even if you had the gamer mobo for it, at best you could get 400mgz out of it, hardly worth it, better would be to change the cpu to a real P4 chip, i know i have lots of that in stock too.

 

Video cards nothing good too even for a old card, be different if you had a top of the line ATI 9800, lol you know im still on a geforce 6800 ultra.

As well in my part of the world i can get basic core 2 dual computers with 2 gigs ram good to go for like $60,sadly their dells but whatever its $60.

 

I understand what your talking about when it comes to the AV but i still like having one in this day and age, with out one a dark age virus from 20 years ago could take out your system.

 

As well just the newest version of firefox can use like 500megs ram on its own, my self on that old setup you have id go up to 2gigs ram if i could 4x512megs ddr 400mgz + way better video card, i still have some decent AGP cards in stock if its AGP as well as a change to a top of the line P4 cpu for your board, doing all of that wouldn't cost much in any case.



#13 shadow_647

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 07:09 AM

Speaking of darkage virus land if you relly want a AV that uses like no ram then theirs this.

 

http://www.clamwin.com/



#14 Solarium

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 11:51 AM

Thanks for your support, shadow!
At the moment I just keep going with the same hardware (RAM, CPU and video card). I know that old RAM and a real Pentium 4 are very cheap nowadays but I'm still able to use my laptop in the same way as I did 12 years ago. My current video card is ok for YouTube videos and DVDs, since I'm not a gamer (though I remember to have occasionally played some MAME games ten years ago).
Normally, I run 3 apps at maximum: browser (5-10 tabs on average), Thunderbird and block notes. Despite this, I usually run out of RAM (as you rightly said, browsers can easily use 500 or more MB), since I only have 512 MB installed. This means that my WinXP regularly relys on virtual memory, affecting the system performance. But that's ok: performance is still acceptable.
Thanks for ClamWin AV link. I'll have a look at it!




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