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Using viruses to cure bacterial infections


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#1 SuperSapien64

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Posted 13 December 2016 - 04:25 AM

I just watched video about bacteriophages and how to they can treat bacterial infections after all bacteria are becoming more resistant to antibiotics and eventually antibiotics wont be affective anymore.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTwEVK7TMWI



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#2 georgehenry

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Posted 13 December 2016 - 06:56 AM

Bacteriophages have been in use for 100 years or more. Because they occur naturally in the sea and river water, several rivers have gained the reputation of healing. They would have been used more often if it hadn't been so easy to produce antibiotics from fungus and moulds. I expect that a lot of work will start now, because of the growing bacterial resistance of pathogens. 



#3 SuperSapien64

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 08:21 PM

I expect that a lot of work will start now, because of the growing bacterial resistance of pathogens. 

Lets hope so georgehenry. :)



#4 georgehenry

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 06:51 AM

Because bacteriophages are little bundles of DNA and RNA that get transferred between bacteria, they can also transfer a resistance to antibiotics. the trick will be to get the right sort of DNA and RNA to transfer the messages that we want to send. Good luck to the scientists! I wouldn't know where to start.



#5 wizardfromoz

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Posted 22 December 2016 - 04:37 AM

Now if you want to read something really scary, try Robin Cook's Nano".

 

Not doing an advertisement, get it out of the Library, like Elaine did, and I am reading it now.

 

Very thought provoking.

 

Cheers all

 

:wizardball: Wizard






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