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RAID enclosure. What is it?


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#1 frldyz

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 11:52 AM

I'm currently piecing together my 2nd build.
 
This 2nd build is going to be very basic.  Not a gaming PC or even a web browsing PC.
 
It will be a PC dedicated and only dedicated to to pictures and videos.
Why you ask?   Why not.
 
I have never done a RAID set-up before.  I would like to try my 1st RAID.  I would like to get a couple of internal HDD's and run a RAID 1.
I currently stumbled on RAID enclosures.  From the little I know these is an alternative place to store your HDD's in RAID vs inside your PC tower.  Is that right?
Do these RAID enclosures set up the RAID for the HDD's?  Or do I still need to go into bios?
I'm looking for the simpliest way to set up my HDD's in RAID 1.
 
Before anyone gives me a hard time about buying an external hard drives, HDD, flash drives, optical discs, cloud storage etc.  Hear me out.
 
My family and I take 1000's of pictures of our family with our phone.  Now that I am a father these pictures are priceless to me.  I currently have all of the above for storage.  But I would like a PC dedicated to this and only this.  Waste of money to some.  Investment to me.
 
 
Thanks everyone

Edited by hamluis, 12 December 2016 - 03:51 PM.
Moved to External from Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 shadow_647

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 05:09 PM

A old beater server computer would do the trick i think, even with raid 1 though all your stuff could still be wiped out by a virus,raid 1 only really protects you vs hardware failures so i would still backup on a external hdd.

 

http://www.pcworld.com/article/132877/RAID.html



#3 baines77

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 05:20 PM

Basically, yes.  The Raid Enclosures, also referred to as a NAS (network attached storage) is nothing more than multiple hard drives inside a box separate from your workstation designed as storage bins basically.  There are options out there that are pre-configured - take 'em out of the box, plug them in and off you go.  There's usually a web interface with them too, so you can manage it from your workstation.  Raid 1 has the advantage of an almost instant recovery period, however, doesn't necessarily prevent data loss (that's a longer post and likely more technobabbly than you care to hear).  Given how you feel about these pics, I'd highly recommend paring your RAID with say a cloud based backup like Carbonite, S3, SoS and the like.  Depending on how many GBs we're talking here, you also have options like OneDrive that provide desktop syncing so any changes you made to your Picture library sync up to the cloud and are safe from any hardware events that would require disaster recovery from the enclosure or otherwise.      



#4 shadow_647

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 05:32 PM

Min were talking cloud based anything anyone can access your stuff, microsoft onedrive = patriot act, seems baines77 cairs little about his privacy.

If you do i wouldn't go with what his saying, backup all your stuff offline use raid 1 but combo that with extrnal HDD backups and you should be golden.

 

Probly a winspy10 user too would be my guess.

 

Seeing as  too OP is not a gamer i would go with linux too.



#5 baines77

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 05:37 PM

So?  Do you have something to hide?  We're talking family pictures here, not sensitive corporate documents with trade secrets.  His primary focus is data protection, let's take the tin foil hat off and stop slinging accusations around.  He's probably got half of them on Facebook, Instagram and other social media sites anyway, so what's the difference?  



#6 shadow_647

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 06:38 PM

Point is some people care about backing up their stuff in this case OP pictures and videos and someone privet life in no ones business but their own, if you want to wear a Facebook live feed cam on your had use winspy10 so all your computer use is loged by Microsoft and have a GPS tracker chip implanted under you skin that's your call but ill pass on living in a world like that, as well a system like that if ever you become a problem for the ruling class you'll soon find out what that system is for.

 

Raid 1 and off-line backup are the way to go imho, handing over all your pictures and videos to the NSA isn't.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlSAiI3xMh4



#7 baines77

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 07:01 PM

You're making a ton of assumptions right now, not only about me, but in general. You're not that important (nor am I) for the NSA to care about seeing pics of your goldfish. Furthermore, if the Feds want your data, they'll get it whether it's in the cloud or on a hard drive under your mattress. All of this is off topic anyway.

#8 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 07:31 PM

Let's bring a little common sense to this discussion.

 

Raid 1 as I understand it does not protect you against hard drive failure. If one of the drives in the set up fails your data is toast. It is a good solution for storing large quantities of data with one access point.

 

The ideal backup solution is three, at least, copies of the data - one set on your computer, one set on a detachable system that is readily accessible, and one off-site in case your house burns down. The set on your computer is self explanatory. The second set should be on detachable hard drive(s) that you keep detached except when either backing up or re-instating - think ransomware. And it is a good idea to have a third current set somewhere outside of your house - anywhere from a friend's house to a bank deposit vault - anywhere that isn't in your house. This gives a level of protection approaching 100%.

 

The example I have given frequently is that of a fair sized haulage and warehousing company I used to work for. They suffered a major fire one night which destroyed their offices and main warehouse. They were effectively out of action for 12 hours, the time it took to get temporary accomodation, office equipment and phone lines, thanks to off-site data backups. Without these back ups they might well have been out of business, many companies have been.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#9 baines77

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 07:42 PM

Right, so to protect against drive failure, you'll want raid 5, 6 or 10. With say raid 6, you can lose two drives before losing data due to parity but that obviously costs more in hardware. Bottom line, no matter your school of thought, and offsite backup, cloud or otherwise, is key.

#10 Kilroy

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Posted 14 December 2016 - 04:11 PM

RAID is NOT a backup solution.  RAID is protection against hardware failure.  If you pick up one of the encrypting viruses and it encrypts your RAID all of your pictures are lost.

 

A RAID enclosure is a simple computer whose only function is to manage a RAID array.

 

I'd suggest saving the money that you would put into the RAID and purchase a cloud backup plan (consider making a donation to Wikipedia while you're there)

 

I use Carbonite.  Currently they are running a 30% off and you can get two additional months free if you use the TWiT.tv link.  I think I paid about $300 for three years of unlimited backup, without videos.  If you need video you need to go with their top plan.

 

Other options that work are to give your family a disk of the pictures you took of them this year every holiday season.  Host the pictures online.  If you're an Amazon Prime member you can use Prime Photos


Edited by Kilroy, 14 December 2016 - 04:14 PM.





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