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Stuck in Automatic Repair (bad sectors?)


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#1 james00007

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 05:32 AM

Please help me to get my PC (MEDION Akoya P5348) out of Automatic Repair nightmare and back into windows 10.
 
PC has been running well for years. I changed settings in BIOS to enable onboard graphics so that I could have 3 monitors, namely: Initiate Graphic Adapter and DVMT Total Gfx Mem. This worked well and after getting the drivers I was able to run all 3 monitors. 2 GFX and 1 Onboard.
 
I was having problems with a program in windows with a clipboard program not copy and pasting properly. The problem with the Repair happened when I was trying to get into BIOS to change back these settings to see if that would fix the issue. 
 
For my PC BIOS is F12 but I forgot this and was hitting F11 and Del to try to get me in and now I'm stuck.
 
All drives seem to be listed in BIOS.
 
When exiting BIOS I get:
 
Intel UNDI, PXE-2.1 (build 083)
Copyright © 1997-2000 Intel Corporation
 
This Product is Coveredby one of more of the follow patents: *Bunch of numbers*
Realtek PCie GBE Family Controller Series v2.53 (02/19/13)
 
Client Mac Addr: *Bunch of numbers*
PXE-E53: No boot filename received
PXE-MOF: Exiting PXE ROM.
 
Reboot and Select proper Boot device or insert Boot Media in selected Boot device and press a key. 
Press any key repeats this, reboot bring me back into Automatic Repair
 
When inside repair I have few options if I click continue it just brings me back into it.
 
System Restore didn't fix the issue.
 
Start-up Repair: couldn't repair your PC.
 
In command prompt which is where I think I might be able to get some results it shows x:\windows\system32
I read a post on selective boot up with bios that suggested 
 
get cmd to open and check
bootrec /fixMBR
bootrec /Fixboot
bootrec /rebuildBCD
and also
chkdsk /r c:
chkdsk /r d:
chkdsk /r e:
chkdsk /r f:
 
all I get is The system cannot find the file specified I guess because I am in x:\ rather than c:\
not sure what to do to get it to switch back to my SSD drive to run most of these.
I did manage to get chkdsk on c to work and left it running overnight, it seemed to have found bad sectors but said it was fixed. 
 
I upgraded my PC from windows 7 a while ago online so have no Windows Disk.
Not sure what to do or try next maybe something in the command prompt?


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#2 dc3

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 10:57 AM

Are you pressing Enter after each command to repair/rebuild the mbr?

 

You can use the Media Creation Tool to create Windows 10 installation media for a disc or flash drive.
 
There are three options, use the second option Using the tool to create installation media (USB flash drive, DVD, or ISO file) to install Windows 10 on different PC.
 
Please do the following to determine the health of your ssd.
 

Please download and run SeatTools for Windows.
 
Before the installation begins you will be prompted to either Decline or Accept the terms of the installation, click on I Accept.
 
Once the installation begins you will see an image similar to the one below.
 
seagate3_zps1fa1f71c.jpg
 
1.  SeaTools for Windows will search for HDDs and SSDs on your computer.  Please remove any external storage devices connected via USB ports.
 
2.  Detected Drives will list the HDDs and SSDs found.  Place a check mark in the drive box you want to run the scan on.  This should be the drive that has the operating system installed on it, this is usually C: drive.
 
3.  You will see Basic Tests toolbar above Detected Drives, move the mouse pointer over this to open the test options.  Please click on Long Generic Test
 
4.  This will start the scan.  When the scan is complete you will see the result under Test Status , please post the results in your topic.
 
 seatools4_zpsd7balf76.png
 
5.  The test will indicate either Pass or Fail.  Post the results of the scan in your topic.
 
6.  Click on Help, then click on View Log File.  If the scan failed take a screen shot of the Log File and post it in your topic.
 
 
 
 

Edited by dc3, 11 December 2016 - 11:01 AM.

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#3 james00007

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 11:21 AM

Thank you for your reply.
 
I was pressing enter after each command.
 
I have managed to find the USB memory card I used to upgrade to windows 10 do you think it would be better to use this or create a new one?
 
I now can't get into BIOS with F12 to change the boot order it just brings me to the Intel UNDI part again.
 
Not sure how I can run SeatTools for Windows in this current state :(


#4 dc3

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 11:41 AM

Do not use the upgrade installation media, create new installation media as I suggested.

 

You should do a in-place upgrade using the installation media you will create.  There is a very good tutorial available, you will find it here.

 

Back to chkdsk /r.  You should not use the /r switch on a ssd, you should run chkdsk /f.


Edited by dc3, 11 December 2016 - 01:42 PM.

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#5 james00007

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 01:32 PM

 
I have ran chkdsk /f c: in command prompt
 
Windows has scanned the file system and found no problems. No futher action is required. It does say 4kb in bad sectors though not sure if this is anything to worry about. Hope I didnt mess anything up by running /r on it. 
 
I tried putting the windows 10 on a 16gb sandisk usb key this gave me the error We can't find a USB flash drive. I tried an 8gb key (different manufacturer) and again the same problem. I also tried burning an ISO to a DVD+R and it failed when writing. Currently re-downloading to try burning to DVD again but not holding much hope. its one nightmare after another. 
 
Is there anything else I can try in cmd or just a matter of getting a working windows usb or dvd?


#6 dc3

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 01:43 PM

If you are trying to boot from the flash drive you will need to enter the BIOS and change the boot order so that the first device is a USB device, the second device would be either the SSD or HDD.

 

If you intend to use the installation media to run a inplace upgrade you will need to use the instructions I posted previously, then


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#7 james00007

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 02:58 PM

I am unsure which key even gets me into BIOS. I thought it was F12 but now when I press that I get the Intel UNDI
 
PXE-E53: No boot filename received
PXE-MOF: Exiting PXE ROM.
 
Managed to get a working DVD. In automatic repair I clicked Use a Device presed key to boot from CD. Options are Intall now or repair your computer. I choose repair and it brings me back into automatic repair. Continue to windows bring back to automatic repair.
 
Should I try the Install now from the dvd or something else in automatic repair options?
 
Still stuck in the loop
 
Cant do the in-place upgrade I dont think? Confusion
It says you must be signed in as an administrator to be able to do a repair install of Windows 10. You will only be able to do a repair install of Windows 10 from within Windows 10. You will not be able to do a repair install at boot or in Safe Mode.

Edited by james00007, 11 December 2016 - 03:00 PM.


#8 dc3

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 03:27 PM

In post #4 I suggested doing a inplace upgrade to repair the computer.  I even provided you with information to download the installation media.  This is what you should do.


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#9 james00007

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 04:57 PM

I am able to get into BIOS again. 
 
Sorry for any confusion or frustration. Maybe I am missing something but at the moment I am totally lost. 
 
In the guide you linked me to I watched the video and it says 4 You can only repair Windows 10 from within Windows 10.
 
The guides first step is 
 
Here's How:
 
1. Sign in to an administrator account in Windows 10.
 
I cant complete this step.
 
I have burnt the windows DVD as per your instruction and can boot into it but any repair I try to make bring me back to the Automatic Repair screen.
 
 
 
I am using my laptop to troubleshoot this. The problem PC is my main desktop PC. I have burned a windows 10 DVD disk on my laptop from:
 
Media Creation Tool.
with option: Using the tool to create installation media (USB flash drive, DVD, or ISO file) to install Windows 10 on different PC.
 
I booted to this DVD and options are  Install now or repair your computer. Tried a repair which just brings me back to the Automatic Repair options. 
 
The only thing I can think of trying next is Reset this PC: Keep my files (Removes apps and settings, but keeps your personal files. 
 
Is there anything else I can do or try before resorting to this?


#10 james00007

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 11:58 AM

I may have found the problem and close to a solution just need a little more help.
 
It seems that my drive letters have been mixed up.
 
I have a lot of drives so its a little confusing and want to be sure on my next step.
 
DSC_0287_this_one.jpg
 
I see volume 3 set to C and my SSD is volume 8 set to E (I think this is my windows install?).
 
DSC_0258_2.jpg
 
a little confused on what to do next to get these in the right order using diskpart options:
 
select disk 0 ; selects the first disk 
list volume ;shows all of the volumes on the selected disk and their drive letter and size
select volume 0 ; used to select the volume on the first disk
assign letter=e ; changes the drive letter assignment to a new drive letter e in this case.
list volume ; use this to show your changes are what you want them to be.
select volume 2 ; this is the volume that has windows on my machine and needs to be set to drive c
assign letter=c ; this assigns the drive letter to that volume
list volume ; use this to confirm your changes=
exit ; use this to exit the diskparm.exe program


#11 FreeBooter

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Posted 13 December 2016 - 04:17 AM

When computer boots into WinRE environment the drive letter assign to Windows partition may not be C: drive letter because Windows 7, 8 , 8.1 and 10 creates a separate system partition when it's installed from scratch. The system partition contains boot files WinRE assigns the system partition the C: drive letter and the Windows installed partition will be assign any other drive letter usually D: drive letter is assign to Windows installed partition. The Bcdedit /enum | find "osdevice" command can be use to find out the drive letter of the Windows installed partition the output of the Bcdedit command is similar to this osdevice partition=D:. The drive letter after partition= is the drive letter of the Windows partition.
 
 
You have one drive which status shows it has failed its volume 1 check the cable connections to this drive as @dc3 instructed use the SeatTools for Windowsto view each connected hard disk drive SMART health.


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