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Need help on buying a new gaming PC!!!!!!!!


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7 replies to this topic

#1 lolokay

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 12:06 AM

Okay hi basically i just made an account because i really need help from someone who actually knows what they're talking about and can explain to me.

I really want a gaming PC, i have no idea what is so good about them, i am literally clueless so i was hoping someone could explain to me how they are different from normal PC's, which of them are good/bad, how cheap can I get a good gaming PC for.

Please someone help it would be very much appreciated!!



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#2 Kilroy

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 11:22 AM

Welcome to Bleeping Computer.

 

A gaming PC normally has a better video card than a general use PC, if you were to pick one defining piece.

 

Here are a couple of articles on inexpensive builds.

 

Build guide: the best cheap gaming PC - ~ $500

PC build guide: the best budget gaming PC - ~ $750

 

If you don't want to build you would look for a machine with similar specifications.  Neither of the above prices includes the cost of Windows.



#3 SEANIA

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 12:21 PM

A gaming PC normally has a better video card than a general use PC, if you were to pick one defining piece.

 

This^

 

A lot of people actually just take their desktop office/house PC (post 2008) and put a 100$ graphics card in it. That then becomes their first "gaming" PC. Can't do that if it's a laptop though. 

 

You have to use "gaming" in quotes though. As all PCs, to some degree, are gaming PCs. One of the major benefits of gaming on PC is the near infinite backwards compatibility. So if your computer can't play new games, there's nothing stopping you from playing older ones that it can play. It's not like a console where you can only play recent games (with rare exceptions). On a PC you can play games from 1986, 1998, 2002, 2006, ETC without much issue other then a few minutes of googling to figure out if there's anything special you need to do to get it to work.  


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#4 vals24

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 07:01 PM

Ya, it's not too bad nowadays just to throw a gtx 1050 or 1050 ti in. Alternatively here's a list based on your budget

 

http://www.toptengamer.com/top-cheap-gaming-computer/

 

Guys over at reddit build a PC can help you with specific games / benchmarks etc https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/



#5 Planemaster2

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Posted 22 December 2016 - 12:50 PM

@OP

 

What is your likely budget? That way, we can narrow it down for you.

 

Another thing is what games are you looking to play (if you've decided) and what else are you planning to do with the PC?



#6 Zone_86

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 05:56 PM

Anything about building you can get your answers here @ Bleeping. There are a few of us here that have been building for a very long time though I have not been here in these forums long. So far I have upgraded around 20'ish Dell XPS 8700-8900 and HP Envy series PC's with GPU/Power Supply/SSD's - and they are a good deal if you can catch them on sale and with coupons. The Dell XPS Machines are fairly nice they use either H series (XPS 8700) or B series (XPS 8900) motherboards and use a 460W power supply, which is a fairly high quality power supply and handles GTX 1060-1070-RX 470 cards just fine (GTX 1080-RX 480 are bit iffy best to add a quality 650W+ Unit). The HP Envy (or Omen) PC's can come with quality 500-550-600W units and handle about the same though the space is limited somewhat and everything is backwards/upside down with the BTX design they use. Dell also has a new XPS 8910 machine with a pull out PSU swing-arm mechanism and a custom CPU heatsink fan. Thus far I have not touched one of those. There are also pre-built OEM's that are gaming specific like Cyberpower, IBuypower, DigitalStorm etc. They use off the shelf type components like Asus, MSI, Gigabyte, ASRock, Corsair, Gskill, Patriot, Geil, etc. They can be an ok option as well but you have to be careful with the already-built-to-sell units and the  power supplies because they tend to be very underpowered and lower quality so usually with those specific units you have to use the drop down selection menu to change the power supply to a better unit.

 

On the other hand building your own you get the exact components you want and the pride and know-how if building it yourself and managing any issues yourself. The overall cost can be more, or less than a pre-built with the same computing specifications it depends on your component selections and where you buy from.


Edited by Zone_86, 25 December 2016 - 05:59 PM.


#7 Planemaster2

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 02:27 PM

Anything about building you can get your answers here @ Bleeping. There are a few of us here that have been building for a very long time though I have not been here in these forums long. So far I have upgraded around 20'ish Dell XPS 8700-8900 and HP Envy series PC's with GPU/Power Supply/SSD's - and they are a good deal if you can catch them on sale and with coupons. The Dell XPS Machines are fairly nice they use either H series (XPS 8700) or B series (XPS 8900) motherboards and use a 460W power supply, which is a fairly high quality power supply and handles GTX 1060-1070-RX 470 cards just fine (GTX 1080-RX 480 are bit iffy best to add a quality 650W+ Unit). The HP Envy (or Omen) PC's can come with quality 500-550-600W units and handle about the same though the space is limited somewhat and everything is backwards/upside down with the BTX design they use. Dell also has a new XPS 8910 machine with a pull out PSU swing-arm mechanism and a custom CPU heatsink fan. Thus far I have not touched one of those. There are also pre-built OEM's that are gaming specific like Cyberpower, IBuypower, DigitalStorm etc. They use off the shelf type components like Asus, MSI, Gigabyte, ASRock, Corsair, Gskill, Patriot, Geil, etc. They can be an ok option as well but you have to be careful with the already-built-to-sell units and the  power supplies because they tend to be very underpowered and lower quality so usually with those specific units you have to use the drop down selection menu to change the power supply to a better unit.

 

On the other hand building your own you get the exact components you want and the pride and know-how if building it yourself and managing any issues yourself. The overall cost can be more, or less than a pre-built with the same computing specifications it depends on your component selections and where you buy from.

 

Basically this, although a few OEM's (At the budget end) can be found to be cheaper than one you can build as they can order large amounts of stock for a discount per item. Unfortunately these are few and far between and finding one with a reputable company is like trying to find a needle in a haystack.

 

On a side note, I think OP has forgotten about this thread.



#8 Ethan_PCG

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 07:12 AM

If you want a good gaming PC I would reccommend getting yourself an Intel i54690k, you can overclock the 4690 to about 4.2 Ghz, and it's average speed is 3.5 ghz. 

I would reccommend an RX 480, if you can't afford a GTX 1070 or 1080. The RX 480 is a good GPU now because the price will go down in a matter of months, which will make it cheaper, it is also an overclocking GPU. I think that the RX 480 is a lot better than the GTX 1070 and 1080, but that's just my opinion :) 

 

Also, if you don't like the the RX 480 try the GTX 750. To anyone who wants to build a gaming PC I would reccommend going for a cheaper i7 or one of the i5s.. 


"I have always wished for my computer to be as easy to use as my telephone; my wish has come true because I can no longer figure out how to use my telephone."
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