Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Most Effective Linux Server Distro?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 wishmakingfairy

wishmakingfairy

  • Members
  • 212 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:08:23 PM

Posted 07 December 2016 - 03:12 PM

Right now I've been working the past few days on ubuntu server. Setting up small simple things like a samba server, openssh and adding webmin so I can add more modules. However, until I know I've mastered the server parts like ldap, dns, and dhcp setups I know I'll probably never find myself setting up a server for a business.

 

My friend works for a company that knows other people that want to start their own but either lack money or just don't know where to start. So.. kind of like how windows starts to a gui, are there any other linux os's out there similar to Univention Corporate Server?

 

While I don't want to become strictly attached to the gui, I'd still like something that If setup, I could remote in and just add some users or printers in a few clicks.

 

I'm looking for servers distros that can easily without much hassle do:

-Active directory

-Domain Controller (New or transfers)

-File Server

-Print Server

-DHCP

-DNS

 

Nothing huge, just the essential type of server you'd find in a small business without specialized needs beyond the necessary modules I've listed.

 

There is definitely no rush on answers. I have a lot of learning to do in the realm of servers since I never got many chances to work around windows servers.


Edited by wishmakingfairy, 07 December 2016 - 03:15 PM.

Using ubuntu and sharing how to as well as collecting how to scripts for common programs. Feel free to ask or share ^-^


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Viper_Security

Viper_Security

  • Members
  • 826 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1
  • Local time:06:23 PM

Posted 07 December 2016 - 03:19 PM

Have you checked out RedHat Linux?

 

https://www.redhat.com/en

 

or 

 

Ubuntu Server. 

 

https://www.ubuntu.com/server

 

those are the two i have used in the past. they work wonders!

 

Read up on those and see if they fit your needs to a tee.


    IT Auditor & Security Professional

hQBT2G3.png


#3 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,445 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:08:23 PM

Posted 07 December 2016 - 03:53 PM

RedHat you have to pay for.

 

The free version of RedHat is either Fedora, or CentOS. CentOS being more in line with RedHat. Over them all I'd prefer to just stick with Ubuntu Server for a server OS.


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#4 wishmakingfairy

wishmakingfairy
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 212 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:08:23 PM

Posted 07 December 2016 - 05:59 PM

Noted Deimos, I actually didn't notice some of the things I could do. Not to mention I didn't notice the incredibly low ram usage on the default ubuntu server. Even with webmin its only at 300mb ram used.

 

I guess I'll just have to really work at everything until I can nail it down and maybe help some family and friends with a small home / tiny business server setup.

 

The univention server honestly isn't too bad. It does have some features that I'd maybe consider it for such as the server migration from an old server. It however is just like webmin. Once installed you had to access the control panel through the web which made me kind of want to stick to ubuntu server and maybe try to figure out how to migrate stuff from old servers to a new one manually.


Using ubuntu and sharing how to as well as collecting how to scripts for common programs. Feel free to ask or share ^-^


#5 DeimosChaos

DeimosChaos

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,445 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:United States, Delaware
  • Local time:08:23 PM

Posted 07 December 2016 - 06:05 PM

Honestly the most you would probably do in a small home/business setup is create additional users (maybe an AD type environment - may not even need anything that extensive though) and setup shared drives. All the networking type stuff you could just do via the router. If it is a business they may even want to get a small firewall setup (check out untangle). That could do VPNs and things like that through there.


OS - Ubuntu 14.04/16.04 & Windows 10
Custom Desktop PC / Lenovo Y580 / Sager NP8258 / Dell XPS 13 (9350)
_____________________________________________________
Bachelor of Science in Computing Security from Drexel University
Security +


#6 wishmakingfairy

wishmakingfairy
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 212 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:08:23 PM

Posted 07 December 2016 - 06:10 PM

For that I might even use opendns on the router. I remember helping a library before, using opendns to prevent people from going to specific sites. However....there was one person that kept coming in and thinking about it now, probably used a proxy site or something to pull up pornographic images, right in front of the view of the kids room before leaving. Thankfully he was caught and banned from the building.


Using ubuntu and sharing how to as well as collecting how to scripts for common programs. Feel free to ask or share ^-^


#7 uv_marcel

uv_marcel

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:02:23 AM

Posted 16 December 2016 - 05:22 AM

Hello,

my name is Marcel and I am an IT Systems Integrator Apprentice at Univention.

If I understand it correctly, you are not interested in a Linux distro, which web-based gui is a must-have to administrate your system.

 

In Univention Corporate Server you are not strictly attached to the web-based gui, named Univention Management Console (UMC in short).

The UMC is just an easy to use user interface, which executes some "univention-directory-manager"-commands (udm commands in short) in the background.

These udm commands can be execute on the command line by yourself via ssh. Our manuals shows you some supportive commands to administrate your system (http://docs.software-univention.de/manual-4.1.html).

 

In case you want to install one of our Univention Apps, the following commands could be helpful (http://docs.software-univention.de/app-tutorial-4.1.html):

univention-app update -> to get the latest list of applications

univention-app list -> to list all available applications

univention-app install <app> -> to install the app

 

I hope I could help you. Let me know, if you have any further questions.

 

Best regards,

Marcel



#8 NickAu

NickAu

    Bleepin' Fish Doctor


  • Moderator
  • 13,830 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:127.0.0.1 Australia
  • Local time:12:23 PM

Posted 16 December 2016 - 08:48 PM

Hi Marcel welcome.

 

Looks like you guys put a lot of work into the manual and tutorials.

 

Regards

Nick.



#9 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:09:23 PM

Posted 17 December 2016 - 04:00 AM

RedHat you have to pay for.

 

The free version of RedHat is either Fedora, or CentOS. CentOS being more in line with RedHat. Over them all I'd prefer to just stick with Ubuntu Server for a server OS.

 

Plus if one has used the Ubuntu environment for years, to include distros built from it (example, Linux Mint & many others). this makes life a bit easier than stating from an entire new platform. While I don't have a server in use (though need one), would choose the Ubuntu brand over any other. :)

 

I did play with CentOS in my spare time, though never got to the comfort zone that I've had with Linux Mint for nearly 8 years. So the best server application will vary from one person to the other & the chances will be high that if a long term Linux user, the user won't vary far from home, choosing a server distro that uses the same base distro. Really, as long as it takes to get a good feel for a distro, and many has to try a few different types to find the right one. Therefore there's no need to be thrown off in frustration in making a different based Linux server work with their installed OS (if the person is running a Linux distro as their daily OS). If the person is running Windows & wants a Linux server to save on huge licensing fees (over $500 for a single machine copy of the latest Windows Server), then the person can be more open in regards to which Linux Server distro is chosen. 

 

If no previous Linux experience, wants to learn & be up and running as quick as possible, then I'd recommend the Ubuntu Server due to the massive amount of support available in articles, tutorials & on tech forums. It's getting to the point to where I need one, and have plenty of spare components to build one, probably two. Once setup, as I understand, the maintenance is low, and one doesn't have to have a super powerful computer for this, my plans are to repurpose an AMD Athlon II x4 630 2.8GHz quad core CPU, one of AMD's first true quad model lineup that caught Intel with their pants down :P, to build one. Just unsure whether a SFF desktop computer is large enough (could be if two 2.5" HDD's are used in a RAID setup), or would need a tower for extra drives (have both types). Since it won't be used to browse the Web, no need for a SSD, extra GPU, just run whatever graphics ships with the MB. However, reliable HDD's are a must, one reason why I love the WD RE4 line (the older SATA-2 models). These are basically upgraded Caviar Blacks, with twice the cache & same 5 year warranty, in fact have a 1TiB one coming in next week, under warranty until mid-2018 (found on eBay for $32 w/free shipping). 

 

A RAID setup using two identical HDD's may be a good idea, in case one fails, the system will run on the other until replaced. No one wants their Server to totally go down, that defeats the purpose of having one. I also recommend to connect to a properly sized UPS, so that it can be safely powered down, and also protects against momentary outages, surges, good models will provide clean & stable power to extend the life of the hardware. 

 

Just as the Linux community is very diverse, the same can be stated about those running Server clients. No 'one size fits all' applies here. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users