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win10 100 percent disk. dirt slow an understatement


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#1 JaRey

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Posted 05 December 2016 - 09:23 PM

this morning my computer took more than 15 min to boot. now it takes 5 min to respond to a mouse click.  took 4 ever to open task mgr and the c: drive that my OS is on shows 100 percent on the performance tab.  I tried disabling WSearch, superfetch and BIT.  nothing helps. can't download anything because browser won't finish opening.  I'm thinking about trying to boot with a flash drive running linux to see if I can read my c drive to eliminate if it's a hardware problem.

 

Win10 pro64

16gig ram

I7 sandy bridge

c: OS & programs 320G hdd

d:raid0 2x1tb

e:raid0 2x1tb

 

Any ideas

Thanks

James


Edited by hamluis, 07 December 2016 - 05:53 PM.
Moved from Crashes/BSODs to W 10 Support - Hamluis.


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 05 December 2016 - 09:32 PM

Is the computer also slow in Safe Mode? Running a live linux distro is a good idea. Fatdog64 is good because is can boot with SecureBoot enabled and its only about 350MB.

 

http://distro.ibiblio.org/fatdog/web/

 

Fatdog64-710.iso

 

Or you can go with a full distro like Mint Cinnamon. Either will not run as fast as if installed on a hard drive but it should rule out a hardware problem. If booting Mint make sure SecureBoot is disabled if in your UEFI/BIOS settings.


Edited by JohnC_21, 05 December 2016 - 09:33 PM.


#3 JaRey

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Posted 05 December 2016 - 10:38 PM

I tried to start in safe mode and it wouldn't finish loading.

I'll try to get fat dog onto a flash drive. I've only got my laptop with win7x64 and not sure how to.



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 05 December 2016 - 10:46 PM

Download Rufus. Use the Fatdog iso with Rufus to create a bootable flash drive.

 

Rufus Instructions:

Run Rufus with the USB flash drive attached. Select MBR partition scheme for BIOS and UEFI. Leave all boxes as checked. Where FreeDos is shown in the dropdown box select iso image, click the icon, and browse to the Fatdog iso file. Press Start. Any data on the flash drive will need to be backed up as the drive will be formatted.



#5 JaRey

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Posted 05 December 2016 - 11:40 PM

I got fat dog running on the problem computer.  I could access my pics located on the c:drive with blistering speed.  I took me a while to find them though.I'm guessing this means it's not a hardware problem.



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 08:25 AM

Fatdog ruled out everything other than a hard drive problem. We can use another iso file but in order to boot the MB will have to be set to Legacy or CSM boot if the MB is UEFI. Legacy or CSM boot may also be available at the boot menu.

 

Download UBCD. Use Rufus with a USB flash drive. At the menu screen select Parted Magic. At the desktop select DiskHealth. Run the short and long tests. 

 

https://www.technibble.com/gsmartcontrol-monitor-test-hard-drive-smart-data/

 

Edit: Backup your personal data before doing the test. It can either be done with fatdog or Parted Magic but the copy procedure is different for fatdog and will give instructions if you decide to use it.

 

http://fixit.litten.com/linuxfilecopy.html


Edited by JohnC_21, 06 December 2016 - 09:37 AM.


#7 JaRey

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 12:03 PM

It looks like the instructions for Parted Magic are pretty good.  I can use that.  Do I only need to backup the data from the c:drive?  My D & E are pretty big and have lots of my kids videos & pics on them.  I do have a 4tb WD My Book, with room for what's on the C: drive, but if I have to backup the D&E drives, both raid0, I'll need to order another backup drive.  It sounds like I might have to replace at least the C:drive.  Just hoping the raids will remain intact if I replace the OS &programs drive.

 

The MB is an Asus p8p67pro  if this helps.

 

thanks much for all your help



#8 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 12:17 PM

You only need to back up the drive Windows is on. The reason I advised this is because scanning the disk can put additional stress on the drive and if it's marginal you may lose the data currently on it. I'm pretty sure your disk is okay as you were able to open folders easily with fatdog but I just wanted to make sure you know the risks. I don't have much experience with RAID but if it was configured in hardware then I doubt the RAID would be broken with a new Windows 10 install. The problem with RAID 0, striped is if one drive fails you lose everything on both drives. If one of your drives in the RAID fails can you afford to lose everything on your RAID 0 setup?

 

https://www.prepressure.com/library/technology/raid

 

Advantages

  • RAID 0 offers great performance, both in read and write operations. There is no overhead caused by parity controls.
  • All storage capacity is used, there is no overhead.
  • The technology is easy to implement.

Disadvantages

  • RAID 0 is not fault-tolerant. If one drive fails, all data in the RAID 0 array are lost. It should not be used for mission-critical systems.

The MB is a UEFI board so in order for UBCD to boot UEFI needs to be set to Legacy or CSM boot. It's possible the MB can automatically detect if the device needs to boot CSM or UEFI. I believe ASUS uses F8 to access the boot menu.

 

Edit: Personally, from what you posted regarding the contents of your D and E drives, I would back up the data first on the RAID drives even if it required uploading to some kind of cloud storage. Once the data from both drives is backed up I would break the RAID and have two separate drives. Any data you cannot afford to lose should be backed up to two separate locations preferably one being offsite.


Edited by JohnC_21, 06 December 2016 - 12:27 PM.


#9 JaRey

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 01:11 PM

The reason I have 2 raid0 volumes is to mix the videos of my kids.  The raid0 is a cheap way to do this quickly.  Read from one while writing to another.  Most of the original videos are saved on the 4tbWD my book and I should have room to backup what's left on the raid I "read" from.  The raid I write to is just piles of mixed videos of the original assets that still reside on the other raid/backup.  If I lose the write raid, I only lose the time it took to mix them. 

 

You mentioned a new Win10 install above.  I only have the win764pro discs I installed when I built the computer.  Win10 was forced down my throat one morning without consent.  I don't think I'd miss it.



#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 01:36 PM

You have two options. Go back to Windows 7 using your disks or reinstall Windows 10 using the Media Creation Tool. A clean install is always preferable to having an OS upgraded on top of another. Windows 10 can also be reset where it keeps your data files. That could be an option if the drive checks out okay. At any rate having a spare Windows 10 disk is always nice as it allows you to access the Advance Boot Options should the computer have problems booting.



#11 JaRey

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 05:57 PM

I tried using parted magic and I couldn't access either of my raid volumes.  I did play videos from them using fatdog last night. did you have any instructions for backing up with fatdog? or is there a simple way to find the raid volumes with parted magic?

thanks



#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 06:14 PM

Was fatdog able to access the RAID volumes? If yes then I wrote the following guide for copying files using fatdog.

 

Fatdog copy instructions;

Boot Fatdog to the desktop. In the lower left of the desktop you will see your partitions listed as sda1...sda2...sda3...etc. On an upgraded computer from 7 or 8 you will see quite a few. Normally your Windows partition will be on sda3 but it may be different in your case. Click once on the partition icon. The partition should mount and a File Manager Window will open. If you do not see your files/folders then close the Window and click on another sdaX icon. Once you find your correct partition attach your external USB drive. A USB icon will appear on the desktop. Click once on it and another File Manager Window will open. You can resize and move the two windows until they are side by side by left clicking and dragging the corner and title bar similar to Windows. Once you have both windows side by side highlight the data you want to copy by pressing Ctrl and left clicking or left clicking and dragging a window around your files/folders. You only need to click once to open a folder in Fatdog. Once you have your files/folders highlighted drag them from the sdaX window to the USB drive window. A small dialog window will open. Select Copy and check the quiet box.  Once all your files are copied exit out of Fatdog. You may want to open a few to see if the copy was successful



#13 JaRey

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Posted 07 December 2016 - 01:25 PM

I copied my user profile to a usb hard drive.  This contained all the items on my desktop, my documents. etc.  Now I have it plugged into my win7x64laptop and can't open the files. Access denied.  I did succeed in implanting my thunderbird profile into my laptop and open the emails and view the pictures attached to them.  Any older information that was stored on the usb drive is readily accessible.  The same access denied for the files I copied to my 4TB WD My Book yesterday.

 

 

Is something fat dog did?



#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 07 December 2016 - 01:39 PM

I believe you need to take ownership of the hard drive. 

 

This video is for Vista but it's good for 10 also. If it does not work then I can post some other commands.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2wkaMFsh04


#15 JaRey

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Posted 07 December 2016 - 03:27 PM

I watched thaat and it didn't quite apply to win7 bot this video popped up in the right

https://youtu.be/b4yDe1BZZ9M

This worked on my 1tb usb hard drive.

It did not work on the 4tb WD.  Each of the folders that I copied came up in an error window saying access denied.

Do I have to go through each folder and change permissions?






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