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Laptop Display


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#1 Bechamel

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 10:13 AM

My laptop was connected to an external HP monitor. And i was playing with the resolution of the the external monitor, and suddenly a "Out of range" message popped and now both the external and built-in screens don't work and my laptop is literally unusable. Please help

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#2 RolandJS

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 10:33 AM

If you were adjusting the resolution from within Windows, you might get everything back by attempting Safe Mode booting/loading and resetting the resolution to 1366 x 768 at first.  If you get into UEFI, can you see a display?  If you boot a usb stick or dvd -- can you see a display?


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#3 Bechamel

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 10:44 AM

How can I attempt safe booting, because when I hit F8 nothing happens

#4 RolandJS

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 10:50 AM

How can I attempt safe booting, because when I hit F8 nothing happens

Which Windows?  Yeah, I can relate!  Windows 8 and 10 are very difficult to do the F8.  Do you have a display in UEFI?  Do you have a display from a usb or dvd boot?  Reason for asking:  I'm trying to rule in or rule out the fluke that the laptop's graphic card went out.


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#5 britechguy

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 10:54 AM

It seems that many, but not all, UEFI interfaces can be invoked at boot by hitting ESC about once per second in the same way as you used to hit F8 to invoke safe mode.  

 

It's worth a shot, anyway, or you could look up the documentation for the system you have at your manufacturer's website on another machine.

 

My gut is telling me that the "out of range" may be about the Hz refresh setting rather than the actual pixel resolution, but that's just a guess, too.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#6 RolandJS

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 12:34 PM

...My gut is telling me that the "out of range" may be about the Hz refresh setting rather than the actual pixel resolution...

Britechguy, I believe you are correct, I have used 66Hz for refresh for years now.  However, I think setting the wrong resolution within Windows can return a blank display if not simply a horrible display -- until fixed by somehow getting into Safe Mode and setting resolution slider to the "middle", and then carefully experimenting one increment at a time.  My old Pentium III MMX did something like that once.


Edited by RolandJS, 02 December 2016 - 12:34 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

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Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#7 britechguy

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 01:16 PM

Also, with regard to booting into safe mode, what follows is almost completely applicable to Windows 10 as well as Windows 8.1:

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Are you struggling to boot into Safe Mode in Windows 8 or Windows 8.1? Have you tried pressing both F8 andShift+F8 and they don't work? That's because a lot has changed with the boot procedure in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1. The boot has become so fast that it literally cannot be interrupted by any of your keypresses. Here are 5 ways in which you can boot into Safe Mode, that don't involve any special hacks or manual configuration.

Safe Mode in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1

Safe Mode in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 is not too different from the Safe Mode found in earlier versions of Windows.

 

The operating system still loads only the most basic drivers and services, so that it can display a minimal useful interface. The only important difference is that the minimum screen resolution used by Safe Mode has risen from 800x600 pixels to 1024x768 pixels.

1. Use the System Configuration Tool (msconfig.exe) - works in Windows 8 & 8.1

The easiest method for booting into Safe Mode is to use the System Configuration tool, also known as msconfig.exe.

Go to the Boot tab and, in the Boot options section check the box that says "Safe boot". Then, click or tap OK.

 

You are informed that you need to restart your computer. Click Restart or Exit without restart depending on whether you want to restart now or later.

 

At the next restart, Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 start in Safe Mode.

2. Use Shift + Restart - works in Windows 8 & 8.1

Another method is to press the Power button at the Windows login screen or in the Settings charm. Then, press and hold the SHIFT key on your keyboard and click Restart.

 

Windows asks you to choose an option. Press Troubleshoot.

 

In the Troubleshoot screen, press Advanced options.

 

In the Advanced options screen, press Startup Settings.

 

You are informed that you are about to restart in order to change several Windows options, including enabling Safe Mode. Press Restart.

 

Your computer or device restarts again and displays nine startup settings, including Safe Mode, Safe Mode with Networking and Safe Mode with Command Prompt

 

Press the F4 key on your keyboard, to enable Safe Mode, F5 to enable Safe Mode with Networking and F6 to enableSafe Mode with Command Prompt. Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 now boot according to the setting you selected.
Read the next page in this guide for another three ways of booting into Safe Mode.

3. Boot from a System Recovery CD/DVD - works only in Windows 8

In Windows 8, but not in Windows 8.1, you can create a system recovery CD or DVD. Here's the tutorial that shows how it is done: How to Create a System Repair Disc for Windows 7 & Windows 8.

Once you have that disc created, boot from it. When asked to press any key to load its content, do so.

First, you are asked to choose your keyboard layout. Press the layout you want to use. If you want to browse through the available options, press "See more keyboard layouts" until you find the one you want to use.

 

Then, the Choose an option screen is shown.

 

From here on, the steps are identical to those shown for method 2.

4. Boot from a System Recovery Memory Stick - works in Windows 8 & 8.1

In Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 you can use the Recovery Media Creator to create a system recovery drive on a USB flash Drive. Details instructions can be found in this tutorial: How to Create a Recovery Drive on a USB Memory Stick in Windows 8 & 8.1".

Boot from the USB memory stick and follow the same instructions as in method 3.

5. Use F8 or Shift + F8 (doesn't work when using UEFI BIOS & SSDs)

In Windows 7, you were able to press F8 just before Windows got loaded, to open the Advanced Boot Options window, where you could choose to start Windows 7 in Safe Mode.

Some websites advise you to press Shift+F8, just before Windows 8 or 8.1 starts loading so that you make it start therecovery mode, from where you can boot into Safe Mode. The problem is that, most times, Shift+F8 and F8 don't work, even though they are correct commands, supported by Windows 8 and Windows 8.1.

This official blog post from Microsoft (Designing for PCs that boot faster than ever before) explains that this behavior is caused by their work in designing a very fast boot procedure. Both Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 have the fastest boot times ever. To quote Steve Sinofsky:

"Windows 8 has a problem – it really can boot up too quickly. So quickly, in fact, that there is no longer time for anything to interrupt boot. When you turn on a Windows 8 PC, there's no longer long enough to detect keystrokes like F2 or F8, much less time to read a message such as "Press F2 for Setup." For the first time in decades, you will no longer be able to interrupt boot and tell your PC to do anything different than what it was already expecting to do."

If you have modern PC with a UEFI BIOS and a fast SSD drive, there's no way you can interrupt the boot procedure with your keypresses. On older PCs, with a classic BIOS and no SSD drive, pressing these keys might still work though.

Conclusion

I hope you found this guide useful. If you know other ways you can make Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 boot into Safe Mode, don't hesitate to share them via the comments form below. Many readers will find them useful.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Sorry about the missing images above, since this forum doesn't allow pasting of inline images out of word documents they don't show up, and even if it did I've been out of attachment/photo space here for ages now because the limit is, in my opinion, quite low.  The text may prove to be enough.

 

I also can't recall definitely, but I think that holding Shift while starting from "off" (provided fast boot isn't enabled) will also trigger safe mode.  I hate fast boot and turned it off long ago on my machines.


Edited by britechguy, 02 December 2016 - 01:17 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#8 cmptrgy

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 03:27 PM

Even though you did some settings within Windows10 on your laptop and there isn't any resolution yet, consider connecting the external monitor to a known good desktop and use its manual settings to set it to factory defaults and make sure it runs ok.

--- Then see if it will perform on the laptop?

I know you did some changes within Windows on your laptop but you have nothing to lose on trying that idea.

--- Both the laptop display and the monitor display are now black so I don't see how you can get into Safe Mode at this time.



#9 Bechamel

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 04:39 PM

Thank you all for your help so much!! Special thanks to britechguy, the ESC thing worked and I fixed the problem. Again, thanks for everyone who tried to help me much appreciated guys <3

#10 britechguy

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 07:22 PM

Bechamel,

 

          What was the actual problem (or what appeared to be the actual problem)?  It's always helpful to have this information posted in case someone else encounters similar symptoms - it gives something (or some things) to explore.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#11 cmptrgy

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Posted 05 December 2016 - 08:37 AM

I more than appreciate britechguy's ESC recommendation.



#12 Bechamel

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Posted 05 December 2016 - 08:40 AM

The problem that i set my laptop to only display on "Monitor 2" which is an external display. So the built in one only will work if i reset it. And i accidentally set the external monitor on a refresh rate ir can't handle, above 60hz. Which made both monitors don't work.

#13 britechguy

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Posted 05 December 2016 - 09:47 AM

One big advantage, at least to me, on Windows 10 is that it will automatically set a laptop back to primary display if you direct output to "Monitor 2" but there is no actual Monitor 2 physically connected to the system.  It takes about a minute of it trying to find one then it reverts.  Or at least that's been my experience on every Win10 laptop I've tried this on.  If you have one connected, though, it doesn't try to figure out whether you've configured the refresh rate incorrectly or done anything else that makes that secondary display non-functional, all it has to be is there.

 

One of the perpetual issues of old is when people would be trying to get output to a secondary display on a laptop (and this was most often a projector for a meeting) they'd either succeed in doing that, but not realize they had to undo it, or they'd get themselves into the state where neither the laptop nor secondary output was working and panic.

 

Thanks for posting about what actually occurred.  This will prove useful for future searchers.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#14 Gert1985

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 10:34 PM

I hit the same problem with my laptop and now I have solved with above method. So it is very handy and good to me also.






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