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Windows Defender as integral part of Windows 10


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#1 RbtCmpt

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 01:04 AM

I just read an article about Defender and it sounds pretty good.

I've been having humongous problems with Windows Defender for years - on many machines, such as it just hanging for hours, sometimes days, either scanning or 'updating' with no results whatsoever.

Hey if this is good now, I'd like to ditch Avast which is way too invasive and seriously slows both my computer and phone - and uses battery power like nothing else.



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#2 cafejose

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 01:28 AM

Microsoft Security Essentials is now Windows Defender in Windows 10.  Uninstalling and completely removing your currently installed protection and security product will reactivate Windows Defender and Windows Firewall.  



#3 richcbro

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 02:53 AM

Windows Defender is now part of the Windows 10 and 8.1. It does offer basic protection to your computer, as long as you practice safe browsing, it is more than enough. The good thing about Windows Defender is that it is completely free, and does not show a lot of ads that just want you to upgrade to paid version, like many free AV do.

 

Remember, no AV is perfect, I usually recommend running an AV with Anti-Malware to get extra protection. Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is popular, both free and paid. I do recommend paid version for the real-time protection and it won't interfere with AV.


Edited by batman1234, 18 November 2016 - 02:54 AM.

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#4 britechguy

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 10:51 AM

I've been using Windows Defender exclusively for several years now on Windows 8 and later machines.

 

I have repeatedly made the same assertion offered by batman1234:  "Browsing hygiene" is far more critical to avoiding infection than any security program, regardless of type, can be.

 

I also advise my clients that if they have not had a thing quarantined in as long as they can remember by their antivirus or antimalware scanners that they are clearly practicing good browsing hygiene.  When that's the case the antivirus you are using should be almost irrelevant unless you were to somehow deviate from your usual behavior or someone came up with an infection mechanism that's entirely new and that they could put into place in "previously safe places" very, very quickly.

 

All anti{insert term here} scanners rely on sample submission, whether automatic or user generated, to keep up with new threats being "released into the wild."  That means that someone (more likely a number of someones) are going to get infected before scanners even recognize and block these threats.  You can't update your definitions/signatures for something that's brand new until it's been identified as a problem, and that means somebody got hit.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 RbtCmpt

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 03:19 AM

I used to use SuperAntiSpyware until it stopped working - scanned for hours and hours like Defender with no progress at all. SAS used to find hundreds of tracking cookies that Malwarebytes never found. Came up with a trojan once - which blew my mind - I'm extremely fastidious when online.

Now I read *very* bad user reviews of SAS, MBAM amd others; and elsewhere people are promoting them. What to beleive? Kaspersky, Norton and other top ones have gotten busted big time and still some people think they're the greatest things to grace the net.


Edited by RbtCmpt, 19 November 2016 - 03:21 AM.


#6 richcbro

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 06:54 AM

Windows Defender sometimes might scan too slow and look freeze, it happens to me sometimes. You need to be patient, because the AV may be scanning an extremely large file that can take some time, at this time the AV might seem does not make any progress but it actually does. You should try run a scan during night when you won't use computer and let it finish by the morning. Your hard drive may get a lot of temporary files that so down the progress, in this case you should run CCleaner or Disk Cleanup to remove these files.

 

Kaspersky is not bad, it is probably the AV with highest detection rate but costs you a lot of money.

 

MBAM is the most popular AM that is designed to run alongside AV. I have used Windows Defender+MBAM+SAS for years without problems. Each of them removes malware that others miss.


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#7 britechguy

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 12:30 PM

I don't know why it's any surprise to anyone that different tools find different things that the others might not find, even though the "found item" matches the class of thing a given piece of software scans for.

 

All of these programs rely on signature/definition databases and these are far from identical.  It is entirely possible for something to have been reported to "four out of five" antivirus/antimalware/security suite makers that, just due to dumb luck, didn't end up getting reported to the fifth.

 

I've always used antispyware, antimalware, and antivirus programs in conjunction with each other with only the antivirus running as a constant (though most, like Windows Defender, also have at least some antimalware component these days).

 

I can't remember the last time I've had anything identified beyond cookies and/or PUPs that really weren't unwanted in my case.  I still want those tools installed and available in case I should somehow manage to get a rogue infection, particularly since the most virulent tend to prevent you from installing removal tools (or try to, anyway) once they've infected your machine.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 





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