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Snoopers' Charter 2.0: IP Bill passed by Parliament and will become law within w


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 01:30 PM

And people thought Windows 10 was bad. For people in the UK I guess the only solutions would be to use Tails and Tor to keep your privacy along with something like proton mail for your email but I have no doubt the NSA is already doing the same only not saying.

 

Privacy International explained why the powers for government agencies to collect "internet connection records" are so far reaching.

"At the very least, they comprise a 12-month log of websites visited, communications software used, system updates downloaded, desktop widgets used, every mobile app used and logs of any other device connecting to the internet, such as games consoles, baby monitors, digital cameras and e-book readers," it warned.

Any flaws, known or unknown, could then be exploited to break into any individual's computer or smartphone, revealing a much wider range of information about people than they might otherwise realise.

Privacy International added: "They are comparable to a compilation of call records, postal records, library records, study and research records, social and leisure activity records and location records, and will additionally capture concerns about health, sexual and family issues. 

"The agencies would be able to acquire this intrusive, population-level data in bulk under bulk acquisition powers."

 

Article


Edited by JohnC_21, 17 November 2016 - 01:30 PM.


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#2 Gorbulan

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 03:12 PM

Damn! Desktop widgets used? Wha????

 

 

I almost forgot: John, the link "it warned" is invalid.



#3 thelittleduck

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 03:21 PM

This has just made legal what they've been doing for a fair while anyway. 

 

I suppose this will increase the amount ISP's charge there customers to accomodate the new measures. (Not that they seem to need a reason to increase the amount :( )

 

Where's Robert Catesby when you need him? :devil:



#4 paapicholoo

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 11:03 AM

The bill will force internet companies to store their users' browsing data for a year, and will allow the government to force phone makers to hack into people's handsets. But i read this article h t t ps://www.purevpn.com/blog/protect-yourself-from-the-ip-bill/ in which they are suggesting a VPN to avoid this law

Edit: Link to possibly deceptive website deactivated to prevent anyone from inadvertently getting infected. Please do not visit that site without adequate malware protection enabled.~ Animal

#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 01:13 PM

The bill will force internet companies to store their users' browsing data for a year, and will allow the government to force phone makers to hack into people's handsets. But i read this article h t t ps://www.purevpn.com/blog/protect-yourself-from-the-ip-bill/ in which they are suggesting a VPN to avoid this law

And preferably a VPN that does not keep logs and is based in another country. 
 
https://www.bolehvpn.net/

#6 Condobloke

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 05:17 PM

or....

 

https://airvpn.org/


Condobloke ...Outback Australian  

 

fed up with Windows antics...??....LINUX IS THE ANSWER....I USE LINUX MINT 18.3  EXCLUSIVELY.

 

Microsoft gives you Windows, Linux gives you the whole house...

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#7 Mishima

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 05:17 PM

Is this at all related to the new policies China is going to set forth soon (like next June) in server verification and other stuff?



#8 thelittleduck

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Posted 23 November 2016 - 11:09 AM

Plans to keep a record of UK citizens' online activities face a challenge from tech firms seeking to offer ways to hide people's browser histories.

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-38068078



#9 thelittleduck

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 08:54 AM

Among the many unpleasant things in the Investigatory Powers Act that was officially signed into law this week, one that has not gained as much attention is the apparent ability for the UK government to undermine encryption and demand surveillance backdoors.

 

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/11/30/investigatory_powers_act_backdoors/



#10 JohnC_21

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Posted 01 December 2016 - 08:56 AM

 

Among the many unpleasant things in the Investigatory Powers Act that was officially signed into law this week, one that has not gained as much attention is the apparent ability for the UK government to undermine encryption and demand surveillance backdoors.

 

 

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/11/30/investigatory_powers_act_backdoors/

 

I don't see how they can force a developer based in another country to do this. Grab Veracrypt while you can.


Edited by JohnC_21, 01 December 2016 - 08:56 AM.


#11 thelittleduck

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 09:20 AM

I don't see how they can force a developer based in another country to do this.

 

 

The only thing I can think of is by threatening to not allow the developer in question trade in the UK.  This isn't viable as it would severely damage the economy.



#12 JohnC_21

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 10:58 AM

How about Proton Mail and SpiderOak? Both do not keep the encryption key on their servers. Whatsapp also has end to end encryption. I don't live in the U.K. but we have the same issues in the U.S. as you can see on the BC News site.



#13 Gorbulan

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 12:08 PM

How about Proton Mail and SpiderOak? Both do not keep the encryption key on their servers. Whatsapp also has end to end encryption. I don't live in the U.K. but we have the same issues in the U.S. as you can see on the BC News site.

 

I wouldn't call that article on the FBI the same as the UK's anti-privacy bill. Though, it does feel like a step in that direction...



#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 12:16 PM

 

How about Proton Mail and SpiderOak? Both do not keep the encryption key on their servers. Whatsapp also has end to end encryption. I don't live in the U.K. but we have the same issues in the U.S. as you can see on the BC News site.

 

I wouldn't call that article on the FBI the same as the UK's anti-privacy bill. Though, it does feel like a step in that direction...

 

True, but we don't know what the FBI and NSA are doing. We didn't know the extent of the spying until Snowden. At least the U.K. put it in print. 



#15 Gorbulan

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Posted 02 December 2016 - 12:28 PM

I am not worried about the FBI, as I am worried about the NSA. I have always assumed the NSA tracks every bit of data that comes in and out of America. Snowden more-or-less confirmed it. The FBI focuses on law, the NSA focuses on maintaining the status quo.

 

But yeah, at least the UK citizens were told they are being spied on. Apparently in America you are just supposed to obey.






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