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After update, on desktop PC, "Airplane mode" button appearing below network list


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#1 ChrisValle

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 09:46 PM

I have just installed on my desktop PC the "Feature update to Windows 10, version 1607" that Microsoft pushed on me.  Now when I click the icon on the task bar to display the list of networks, at the bottom of that list an "Airplane mode" button appears.  This invites me to turn airplane mode on or off.  This is really stupid, because this is a DESKTOP computer.  This doesn't seem to affect use of the computer, beyond being an annoyance--but is this what Microsoft considers to be normal operation?  Thank you.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 12:00 PM

Why wouldn't it be?   I'll admit that it has no purpose on a desktop, but I certainly wouldn't dedicate resources to trying to determine whether the hardware being used is a desktop versus laptop versus mobile.  The range of possibilities for getting that wrong are huge and constantly changing.  If you turn it on a simple click turns it off again.

 

It also makes it simpler to force a temporary disconnect from wireless if you need or want that, and I've had occasions where I do.  Much easier than, say, disabling the wireless adapter via Device Manager.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#3 Gorbulan

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 12:14 PM

Why wouldn't it be?   I'll admit that it has no purpose on a desktop, but I certainly wouldn't dedicate resources to trying to determine whether the hardware being used is a desktop versus laptop versus mobile.  The range of possibilities for getting that wrong are huge and constantly changing.  If you turn it on a simple click turns it off again.

 

It also makes it simpler to force a temporary disconnect from wireless if you need or want that, and I've had occasions where I do.  Much easier than, say, disabling the wireless adapter via Device Manager.

 

True. Last point is a good point, sometimes you just need to disconnect from Wifi or whatever.

 

However, OS's are capable and do differentiate from laptops and desktops. Windows 7 does not have battery options or gauge when there is no battery.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 12:59 PM

 

 

 

However, OS's are capable and do differentiate from laptops and desktops. Windows 7 does not have battery options or gauge when there is no battery.

 

 

The question becomes, and it's a philosophical one, "When and where is this worth doing?"

 

I would say that since Airplane Mode is directly related to WiFi, that its actual function is to shut down WiFi temporarily, and that the desire to do this exists on every platform, including desktops, that this is not something that one would wish to disable or stipple out on a desktop.

 

People understand what airplane mode is about, even if they're not on an airplane, so I really prefer that I have it available on my desktop, too.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#5 Gorbulan

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 01:19 PM

 I would say that since Airplane Mode is directly related to WiFi, that its actual function is to shut down WiFi temporarily,

 

To be accurate, the point of "Airplane Mode" is to disable all antennas. In the case of desktops that is usually just Wifi, but it can also include Bluetooth. As you said, it is much simpler to leave the feature in, since it can alleviate any bugs or problems in the future.

 

Also, one day, in the not-to-distant future, mobile/desktop may be the same thing. I have a feeling Nintendo's new console is a glimpse of the future. And the future is wireless.



#6 ChrisValle

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 08:07 PM

"I certainly wouldn't dedicate resources to trying to determine whether the hardware being used is a desktop versus laptop versus mobile."

 

Except some other setting popped up the other day saying that Windows thought this was a laptop computer.  I changed it to say this was a desktop computer.  So Windows should know.

 

"I would say that since Airplane Mode is directly related to WiFi, that its actual function is to shut down WiFi temporarily...."

 

Below the network list, right next to the "Airplane mode" button, there's a separate "Wi-Fi" button for turning wi-fi access on and off.  Though not in the same location, there's a choice somewhere in settings for toggling bluetooth access on and off.

 

Thank you, everyone.



#7 airmale

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 11:19 PM

Would love to know where this on off button is, have done extensive googling to find out , my desktop computer drops out of connectivity randomly, have to disconnect cable from router and wait a couple of minutes for it to re-boot?



#8 yankeelady2015

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Posted 28 December 2016 - 04:52 PM

Would love to know where this on off button is, have done extensive googling to find out , my desktop computer drops out of connectivity randomly, have to disconnect cable from router and wait a couple of minutes for it to re-boot?

Hello - you can find this under search>settings>network and internet you will find airplane and Bluetooth.  Also click on system then notifications and actions this is where you will find the icons that are on the desktop in the action center (where you were looking and found airplane mode).

 

Hope this helps?

 

Julie






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