Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

What micro soldering iron is good for a beginner?


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 3DMonkey

3DMonkey

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:39 PM

Posted 14 November 2016 - 12:09 PM

I am new to micro soldering and fixing electronic stuff.... the last time I did anything like this was at school theirty six years ago. Anyway, I am in the UK and I would like someone to suggest what sort of a soldering iron I should purchase for, amongst other things, replacing an android tablet battery, replacing faulty caps in powerline adapters and faulty components on a PC graphics card etc etc? And what other things neccessay should I purchase eg tips or ironheads, type of solder etc?

Thank you.


Edited by hamluis, 10 November 2017 - 06:10 PM.
Moved from System Building to External Hardware - Hamluis.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 Chris Cosgrove

Chris Cosgrove

  • Moderator
  • 5,563 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Local time:05:39 PM

Posted 15 November 2016 - 07:35 PM

I have three soldering irons that do most things between them. For general purpose electronic work, not surface mount, I use an 18W iron with an oval tip about 2.5mm wide. For those occasions when I feel courageous - or desperate - enough to tackle surface mount I have a 12W iron with a pointed bit. And for those occasions when something with a bit more grunt is called for I have a 50W iron with an oval bit about 5mm wide - it doesn't get used very often.

 

You will also need an appropriate stand for the iron and a de-soldering pump is an essential tool. Some swear by de-soldering braid, I swear at it, but I know people who use it sucessfully.

 

You also need solder. You can still get the traditional tin/lead solder but it is being replaced by lead-free on safety grounds, and if you are thinking of going professional lead-free will be obligatory. For electronics work you want fairly fine solder, about 22 SWG or whatever its metric equivalent is - about 0.75mm. A tin of flux is always useful as well.

 

All of these can be bought from Maplins, RS Components, Ebay, probably Amazon and no doubt other sources as well.

 

That is a fairly basic list for basically amateur or occasional use. For professional or industrial use there is a wide range of higher capacity equipment.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 PerspectiveObjective

PerspectiveObjective

  • Members
  • 76 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:This tiny speck in the universe somewhere in the middle of time.
  • Local time:12:39 PM

Posted 15 November 2016 - 08:13 PM

You know those copper scrub things for pots and pans?, I always have a bag around somewhere, they are copper, I JAM! a few in a tin can, actually the progresso soup can its juuuuuuust right, anyhooooo I jam in as many as it will take.

Now when your tip get CRAP ON IT, .... well just JAM THE BEHEYZEUS!(holy-crap) out of it in that copper brillos/SCRUBBIES stuffed in that can and it comes out clean as a whistle!

In any event/for the most part::: It makes an excellent tip cleaner in a pinch.

Additionally//Accordingly, on my irons(several), well specifically the cords, I have multipe flavors

of the silly solder RIPPED OUT ! of the containers and wrapped all over my cords, because when I'm in a hurry

or someone else needs something done repaired what-have you, I can fly out or over to their place college whatever! and I basically never EVER

have to look ! around

for

solder

 

Oh, LASTLY, I've different flavors 50/50 or 60% lead and 40% whatever FLAVORS/Brands/mixes/grades because

only a few will actually melt nicely into the copper wires, or around the copper tubing.(most solder I find here and there

hardly melts, I've some 70/30 or such melts with a lighter even HA!). By nicely I mean it ACTS ! /behaves like in the books

... and in the videos, it seldom works by just putting the iron on the copper....> Getting it HOT! so the solder touching it

will svelt / swelt ? / sweat perfectly all over the copper item your working on, that's kinda sorta like only in the movies
as they say.... well unless you use a very hot iron, which I'm sure some will say is not for use with little light pieces/electronics.


Edited by PerspectiveObjective, 15 November 2016 - 08:14 PM.

Oh those are really nice, where`d you get them done at? YOUR NAILS SILLY! Banter/Wit is a primary member requirement to colossal project solution.  Not to toot my horn

......          (                (        (       (     :trumpet: but, who else will!? teeehehehehehheeee!~~~8 : P


#4 3DMonkey

3DMonkey
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:39 PM

Posted 16 November 2016 - 03:21 PM

Thank you Chris and Perspective. I will bear these in mind.



#5 chhrisedwards

chhrisedwards

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rolling Meadows, Illinois, USA
  • Local time:11:09 PM

Posted 08 November 2017 - 11:57 PM

I think Pag-Kis - 1732 Pencil Pointed Tip 30W Soldering Iron is good for beginners.



#6 3DMonkey

3DMonkey
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:39 PM

Posted 09 November 2017 - 06:26 AM

 

Thank you Chhrisewards, I will take a look at that.



#7 The-Toolman

The-Toolman

  • Members
  • 654 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:39 AM

Posted 13 November 2017 - 10:47 AM

 Pencil Pointed Tip 30W Soldering Iron is good for beginners.

Excellent choice for beginners.

 

I use a 30 watt pencil tip soldering iron for mot small electronic repairs.

 

For a clean solder joint take a small wet sponge and place it in a bowl and each time you go to solder a joint or anything run the tip across the sponge and a clean joint will always happen.

 

http://www.aaroncake.net/electronics/solder.htm

 

Rosin core solder is the good old stand by choice of solder for electronic repairs.

 

https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/3/what-are-the-different-types-of-solder-used-for

 

https://www.jameco.com/shop/keyword=60/40-rosen-core-solder

 

 

My 2 cents. :)


Edited by The-Toolman, 13 November 2017 - 12:21 PM.

Linux Peppermint 7 (64 Bit) Dell Dimension E521 (06 / 11 / 2007) / Amd Athlon 64 X2 4000+ Processor (2.1 GHz, 1024 KB L2 Cache, rev. G1, Socket AM2) / Samsung Memory DDR2, 4.0 GB, 533 MHz FSB / Nvidia GeForce 6150 LE [C51] Integrated Graphics Adapter.

 

Linux Peppermint 8 (32 Bit) / Dell Optiplex 360 (11 / 28 / 2008) / Intel Core 2 Duo Processor E6300 Conroe (1.86 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB, 2M Cache, LGA 775 Socket) / DDR2 Memory 3.0 GB, 800 MHz FSB / Graphics Card Nvidia GeForce 7300 LE [G72] PCIE.

 

 


#8 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 5,278 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:12:39 PM

Posted 13 November 2017 - 11:00 AM

I'll also chime in that I have had great success with a 30W small tipped soldering iron when working with electronics.

 

I have cursed at both desoldering pumps and desoldering braid.  I now tend to favor desoldering braid/wick because if you hold it in place on the joint as you heat it as soon as the solder liquifies the braid is hot enough to soak it up immediately.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#9 mjd420nova

mjd420nova

  • Members
  • 1,474 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:39 AM

Posted 13 November 2017 - 11:43 AM

It is almost impossible to keep those solder suckers clean.  Wick is great if fluxed or too much heat for surface mounts.  I use a temp controlled  unit from weller and various tips for each individual application.  Got the 30W and 75 watt jammed in the bottom drawer of the tool box, no wood burning needed.  I have a small desoldering station for serious MOBO work but takes a long time to get ready.  Found the plunger type solder sucker tends to lift traces off  a PCB if the iron isn't removed first. The rebound punches the board. 



#10 britechguy

britechguy

    Been there, done that, got the T-shirt


  • Moderator
  • 5,278 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Staunton, VA
  • Local time:12:39 PM

Posted 13 November 2017 - 01:38 PM

mjd420nova,

 

           You are doing work that is clearly far more extensive and far more precise than I generally need to do.

 

           Anyone who's going to be working on something like a modern motherboard should follow your sage path and get a temperature controlled unit with several very fine "pinpoint" tips.

 

           Most of what I do is on vintage radios or, more frequently, vintage through reasonably recent automotive PCBs.  These are a lot less delicate by design.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website address in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose
              

 


#11 mightywiz

mightywiz

  • Members
  • 276 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:09:39 AM

Posted 14 November 2017 - 10:19 AM

most soldering irons you can buy different tips, you don't have to go with specific brands of irons.  you really just need to correct tip.

 

USA made Weller is an industry standard and has many different irons and tips available for any situation you could ever want.  and if they iron heat elements go bad you can just buy a new element instead of having to replace entire chinese knockoff unit.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users