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Linux Mint 18 and SSD


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#1 dishdude1

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 02:05 PM

I am doing an install of Linux Mint Mate 18 on an Acer B116 with a new SSD. After installation, are there any settings in the OS that I should change?



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#2 DeimosChaos

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 02:12 PM

The only thing you should do is turn on the firewall! Open up a terminal and type in:

sudo ufw enable

then hit enter. Should prompt you for your password. You'll then be good to go!


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#3 Viper_Security

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 02:47 PM

I'm on Mint 18 with an SSD, and you want to make sure you are using the recommended video driver (mine happens to be Nvidia) other wise it might be a little flicker-y. but other than that and the firewall as DeimosChaos had mentioned you should be fine right out of the box!


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#4 MadmanRB

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 10:43 PM

Should work by default without changing anything except for using a separate /home partition and using btrfs for root (this will make things very fast plus BTRFS works great on a SSD)


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#5 dishdude1

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 11:40 PM

Just did a typical install, boot times are much quicker!



#6 cat1092

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 02:57 AM

The cool thing about SSD install, since Ubuntu 14.04/Linux Mint 17, SSD install is just like that of Windows, the partitions are aligned properly & as far as the install goes, you're good to go! :thumbsup:

 

However you may want to adjust Swappiness to a value of 1 with a SSD to limit wear. Here's a tutorial with needed info. Note that all of the items needs to be added, and be sure to disable hibernation, read Item or section 10 onwards in regard to this. Anything you don't understand, feel free to ask. :)

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/ssd

 

Note that you'll need some tools to work with to perform many actions, here's a single command that'll add several useful ones.

 

 

 


sudo apt-get install doublecmd-gtk leafpad pavucontrol catfish

 

Good Luck with the SSD, these has made my computing life much better since early 2012, have began my journey with the PCIe models, which are 3-4x faster than SATA-3 ones, on both reads & writes. Have some smaller SATA-3 models stored in anti-static bags, for 'just in case' needed one day. At today's pricing, no need to dip below 250GiB, unless one can afford only the 120-128GiB models. Just for the extra speed alone is one reason, the other is the larger the size, the TBW allowed before the SSD dies, which doubles between 120-128GiB & 250-256GiB models. One has to read the specs closely to see these things, otherwise are missed, and with usually only a $30-35 difference between the size brackets, a no-brainer decision. :)

 

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Edited by cat1092, 12 November 2016 - 02:58 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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