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Installing Mint 18. Error message (MDM could not write new) ect ect


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#1 John-Mack

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 01:17 PM

Hello, I am a trying to install Mint 18 on my HP computer via a known good usb stick. during the boot process I received this message  (MDm could not write new authorization file entry to disk. possible out of disc space. error no space left on device.  I have tried looking into the fix but as I am new to Linux most of the fixes I found were over my skill level.  The computer is a  HP Pavilion a6500f with a new hard drive that I have partition so I can dual boot Mint and Windows. I already have Windows loaded and operating on one partition and plan on putting Mint on the other and then I have the last partition as free/backup space. this machine does have the Nvida card which I have seen can be an issue with Linux as I also get the error message (could not start the X server due to some internal error.

Any help on what to my next steps are would be greatly appreciated. 

 

 

 

 



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#2 Al1000

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 01:20 PM

Hi and welcome to Bleeping Computer.

At what point during the installation do you see this message?

Can you run Mint "live" ok from the USB?

#3 John-Mack

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 02:59 PM

Hello,

          Ai1000 thank you for you quick reply!!  I am not at the problem computer now but iirc after selecting which type of of Mint I want to boot (default, mem check,etc) I get to the Mint (M) logo with four or five dots under it then I get the error.

I am Installing the 64bit version I believe that is the correct one for the computer I have but am not 100% if that helps you at all. I will double check about running it live when I get home. but I did try the default and compatibility modes and got the same results.

 

    Thank you again for your help!!



#4 Al1000

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 04:53 PM

What you need, and I assumed you were using, is a "live" USB, which entails effectively burning the Mint ISO to the USB.

 

From what you are saying it sounds as if what you have, is Mint installed to a USB, and it would have been installed using a different computer than the one you are currently trying to boot.

 

Is that correct?



#5 John-Mack

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 05:32 PM

Yes you are correct!!  I have installed Mint onto a usb stick from a different computer. On that same computer I tested the install on the usb by running Mint live with it and every thing seems to work.  



#6 Al1000

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 01:48 AM

This USB stick may only boot on the computer that you used to install it on, because it expects to see the hardware on that computer when it boots; drivers for the hardware on that computer will be installed to the USB.
 
If you want a Mint USB that will work in multiple computers, you have a few options. As I recall, there is an application in Mint's menu called something like "USB creator," which will create a "live" Mint USB.
 
I prefer to use UNetbootin which does the same, and has some additional options. To install UNetbootin to your existing USB don't download it from the website; instead open a terminal and run this command:
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install unetbootin
(enter your password at the prompt - you won't see any feedback from the terminal when you type your password, but type it anyway then press enter on your keyboard)

Edited by Al1000, 12 November 2016 - 01:50 AM.


#7 cat1092

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 04:39 AM

If by chance you're at a Windows computer, there's also a couple of more options to create a bootable ISO on USB stick. :)

 

The first, and one I had used for years is the Universal USB Installer, a portable app. Just have your USB stick plugged in, know where your Linux ISO is, it's basically a 3-4 step operation & on BIOS (MBR) based computers, have had a near 100% success rate. This one also optionally allows for a Persistence file, which can be useful for saving sessions (one example). Still one must be stingy with only up to a 4GiB persistence file, if updating, apply only what's needed. 

 

https://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/

 

The second, is Rufus, and like UUI above, portable. It allows one to create a bootable USB stick for both UEFI & BIOS based computers & is now the one I use more often because am having to deal more with UEFI somewhat more than BIOS based models. 

 

https://rufus.akeo.ie/

 

By chance, the opening picture itself explains it all. Just make sure that it's created for the intended computer type, there's also a 3rd option that allows for CSM install (installing an unsupported OS) on UEFI computers, or installing newer OS's the old fashioned way, even on newer computers (though not what I recommend, GPT has an advantage in speed & stores the boot record in more than one hidden area of the drive). The main example being Windows 7, though there are legit workarounds to that, as well as Vista, however EOL is approaching for the latter. Most 64 bit Linux distros has the needed keys for a UEFI install, so if that's the type of computer you have, go for UEFI with GPT partition scheme. 

 

That's why some bootable apps comes up short, in not selecting the right type of install method for the intended computer, especially if the USB stick is performed on a different one. Rufus eliminates this, as long as the right option is chosen. :)

 

Since all that I know is that you have a HP computer (no model), I can't say for sure which is the best of the two to use, while Rufus can create a USB stick for MBR based computers, doesn't offer the Persistence option for if needed. That's enough space to install & test drivers & keep the settings for another session. :thumbup2:

 

Good Luck & don't hesitate to ask questions if needed. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#8 John-Mack

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 12:04 PM

Got it!!  

Thank you both very much for your help. After re reading the last post several times(im a little slow) I ended up downloading Mint and unetbootin on the problem computer and everything is working fine.

 

Thank you all very much for your detailed and kind responses.



#9 Al1000

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Posted 12 November 2016 - 03:16 PM

Great, glad you got it working. :)

Thanks for letting us know.

#10 cat1092

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Posted 15 November 2016 - 04:38 AM

John, happy to hear you got things up & running! :)

 

Enjoy Linux Mint, as I have for 7.75 years. :thumbsup:

 

Should you require further assistance, and chances are that you will, please don't hesitate to create a new Topic in ragards to the issue. Here at Bleeping Computer, and especially in our Linux Community, there's no such thing as a 'dumb' question. We're here for you when assistance is needed. :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#11 John-Mack

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Posted 15 November 2016 - 04:27 PM

Thank you all for your very generous offers of support (I need it).

  Part of my problems are that all of my computers (3 desktops & 2 laptops, none of them very new) are all running Windows XP and I am getting a little nervous as I realize that this outdated OS is a security risk.

I have been experimenting with a couple of Linux distros and have found Mint to be a pretty good fit for me, However I have 4 kids and a wife that I am going to have to try and "sell" them on using Linux before I think about switching my computers over. Not being a "Linux" guy or even a computer "guy" I am going to need something relatively easy to use, both for myself and for the rest of the family.    

 

  Thank you all again

 

  John.



#12 pcpunk

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Posted 15 November 2016 - 06:06 PM

These computers are probably perfect for linux, and at least some of them probably won't be able to run Windows 7 very well or at all.  Other than Windows 7 Linux would be the only other way to go I think.  So it may not be that big a decision, other than buying at least one new one for some things.  May as well prepare yourself to "sell" the idea and give this-article a read, don't have a better article on hand but this one looks pretty good.  Remember to Click on the "Next" at bottom of page, it's Ten Pages long but a quick read.


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#13 cat1092

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 03:36 AM

pcpunk, in that link above, the Insync client is all one needs to have Google Drive on Linux Mint, exactly the same as on Windows. 

 

The catch is that one has to be subscribed to many Linux newsletters so that one doesn't miss out on these promos, which usually lasts a week or longer. The cool thing being, once the Insync client is activated on Computer #1, then install on the rest. In the Home folder, there will be one with the exact gmail address of the user, that's where the Google Drive files are stored. 

 

Those same folks are also working on a OneDrive client. :thumbsup:

 

The key is to subscribe to Linux newsletters of all types, so that chances of hitting a promo are much higher, here's where I got my Google Drive client & where one will receive a lot of news. :)

 

http://www.webupd8.org/2016/05/limited-time-offer-to-get-insync-pro.html

 

Note that the Insync client I received was a .deb download (64 bit only), though since I signed up for the service & received the link inside of 2 minutes, knew that it was from a trusted source & wasn't going to spend half the day with hash checking. Have been getting newsletters from WEB UPD8 for quite some time. :thumbup2:

 

Also, there's many freebies on the site, including tips on many apps to run on Linux, one is a time fix for Linux/Windows dual booters that once drove me up the wall. This used to be unneeded. 

 

http://www.webupd8.org/2014/09/dual-boot-fix-time-differences-between.html

 

Cat


Edited by cat1092, 16 November 2016 - 03:52 AM.

Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 


#14 pcpunk

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 11:24 AM

Thanks for clarifying that cat, and yes webupd8 is a great site!


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#15 John-Mack

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 04:19 PM

pcpunk Thanks for the info and link to that article. After reading it, none of the things on the list that Linux cant do are a problem for me. The one minor annoyance that I have ran across so far is that my wife is a coupon clipper and she goes on a couple sites that require a special printer app that is only available on Windows as far as I can tell. So I think I am going to have to dual boot with XP when she wants to print coupons!!!

 

Thanks again for your help!!

 

 

John


Edited by John-Mack, 16 November 2016 - 04:23 PM.





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