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Which Partitions should I delete to reinstall Windows 10 32bit -> 64 bit?


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#1 SevereDevotion

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 09:14 PM

So um quick question I have a Dell XPS 8300 running Windows 10 Home 32-bit and I'm reinstalling Windows 10 to 64 bit. My OS build is 14393.77 and my processor is 64 bit based. There are three partitions and I have been told to delete all of them to install Windows 10 clean install. I tried looking it up for which one to delete but I'm not sure if the other Partitions are important to the PC or not. They are 

-Drive 0 Partition 1 39 MB Type: OEM (Reserved)

-Drive 0 Partition 2 RECOVERY 13.26GB Type: System

-Drive 0 Partition 3 OS 452.5GB Type: Primary

Should I leave the Recovery and OEM (Reserved)? Or Should I Delete All of them? Or do I just need to format a drive?


Edited by SevereDevotion, 09 November 2016 - 09:15 PM.


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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 07:04 AM

I would delete them all for a clean install of Windows.


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#3 dc3

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 11:03 AM



I have a Dell XPS 8300 running Windows 10 Home 32-bit and I'm reinstalling Windows 10 to 64 bit.

 

My OS build is 14393.77 

If you are going to switch and install Windows 10 64-bit you do need to use a program like WipeDrive by WhiteCayon to overwrite the entire drive.  There is a free version at the website the link takes you to.  This will provide you with a clean hdd to make the new installation on. 

 

You are using a retail version of Windows 10 64-bit with a legal product code, right???

 

I didn't recognize the version of Windows 10 that you posted (14393.77 ).  The only versions I'm aware of is Home, Pro, Pro Education, Enterprise, Enterprise LTSB, and Windows 10 Education.  The only numerical versions I'm aware of  Windows 10 are the Version 1511, the November update version.  And the Version 1607, the anniversary version.

 

Edited by dc3, 10 November 2016 - 11:03 AM.

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#4 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 11:24 AM

I would not use any third party program to delete any partitions. During installation of Windows 10 64 bit you can choose to delete the partitions at that time. That is how I always do it. Fast safe and simple.


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#5 dc3

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 11:49 AM

The partitions will need to be removed in order to make the installation, whether you use the installation media to do this or a third party program.  Using the third party program insures that the hdd will be completely clean when you go to install the new version of Windows 10 64-bit.  There is no reason not to use DriveWipe to overwrite the hdd.


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#6 britechguy

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 04:46 PM

The following is a serious question, not an attempt at snark:  How on earth did you end up with a 32-bit version of Windows (any recent version of Windows, not just 10) on 64-bit hardware in the first place?

 

I have never seen this, so I'm curious as to how it could come about in the first place.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

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#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 05:21 PM

If the OP had a 32bit version of Windows 7 or 8 the Windows 10 auto upgrade would also be 32bit. I have a 32bit version of Windows 7 running on a Compaq that originally had 32bit Vista with 3GB of RAM.

 

http://www.howtogeek.com/228042/how-to-switch-from-32-bit-windows-10-to-64-bit-windows-10/



#8 britechguy

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 05:45 PM

John,

 

         Was your hardware 32-bit hardware?   I understand that 32-bit upgraded/upgrades to 32-bit and the same for 64-bit, but I've never had a computer with a 64-bit processor come with 32-bit Windows installed, which is the only way I can fathom that this might happen.  Any computer I've ever worked with that has a 64-bit processor has come with a 64-bit version of Windows.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 05:51 PM

If I can remember correctly is was 32bit Vista on a 64bit CPU, a T4200 dual core with 3GB or RAM. It was near the end of life for Vista and I was offered a free upgrade to Windows 7 from HP. I was mailed the 32bit version of Windows 7.

 

I found the specs. As you can see it came with Vista 32bit pre-installed.

 

http://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c01754909



#10 SevereDevotion

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 08:58 PM

The following is a serious question, not an attempt at snark:  How on earth did you end up with a 32-bit version of Windows (any recent version of Windows, not just 10) on 64-bit hardware in the first place?

 

I have never seen this, so I'm curious as to how it could come about in the first place.

3-4 years previously I accidently downloaded a pretty nasty worm/virus and it wiped all my restore points. I have forgotten what it was but it kept on replicating itself after me scanning & putting it quarantine with an antivirus. Ended up just reinstalling Windows and I think I might have installed 32 bit by accident because I used an ISO to reinstall it. I was pretty inexperienced at the time.


Edited by SevereDevotion, 10 November 2016 - 09:26 PM.


#11 britechguy

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 10:48 PM

John,

 

        Well, there was a period "way back when" when 64-bit hardware was "new and exotic" and the software, including OSes, hadn't yet caught up.  I can believe that during the Vista era you might have had 32-bit Windows installed on brand-spankin'-new 64-bit hardware.  It's been so long since I've dealt with Windows Vista that it feels like very ancient history now.

 

SevereDevotion,

 

         That sounds like a perfectly reasonable explanation as to how this came to be on your machine.  We've all been neophytes about one thing or another at one time or another, and when you're dealing with something like you were very often the drive to "exorcise the demons" takes precedence over all else.  There are still lots of mysteries of Windows that are entirely new territory for me, and of hardware as well.  Yesterday I had my first experience with a motherboard that somehow had its firmware get hosed.  I've never had to reset the CMOS by popping out the battery from the motherboard and waiting 15 minutes with the computer completely disconnected from any power source, but doing so got the machine to go from brick to fully functioning.  When it comes to technology there's always something more and something new to learn.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#12 dc3

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Posted 11 November 2016 - 08:59 AM

Even though it is not likely that you will find a CPU that isn't a 64-bit version currently there are still versions of Windows available in the 32-bit.  Windows 10 is available in 32-bit. :blink:   Why anyone would willingly limit their amount of RAM to 4GB which in the end only has between 3.3 - 3.5GB of RAM available after what the address space uses is beyond me.  But... there you are.


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#13 dhjohns

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Posted 14 November 2016 - 09:14 PM

I installed a 32 bit version of Windows 10 Pro on an old Netbook which came with Windows 7 Starter Edition.  It has an ARM (I believe) processor, and 1 GB of RAM.  I did upgrade the RAM to its maximum of 2 GB, and the thing runs fine.



#14 dc3

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Posted 15 November 2016 - 12:18 PM

If you installed a 32-bit version on a computer which had a 64-bit operating system it will not activate.  You have thirty days to activate the operating system, after that you would have a very limited version of Windows.

 

To see if this operating system open Explorer, under Quick access right click on This PC, this will open System.

 

Toward the bottom you will see Windows Activation.  It will show Windows is activated if it is activated.

 

If it does show that the operating system is activated you installed the same version that was on there originally.

 

Let us know what you find.


Edited by dc3, 15 November 2016 - 12:20 PM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





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