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FORMATTING OS AND SYSTEM RESERVED DISK


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#1 passacaglia

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 06:51 PM

I am installing a new win7 Ultimate

 
I am currently running winEnterprise
 
Before installing, I wish the installation disk, which is a SSD, to be totally formatted
 
Not just covered with zeroes, as happens with a quick format
 
There are some quite corrupt files and I want to make sure that no trace of these remain
 
If I recall correctly, the installation disk has a format option
 
But that is a quick format
 
Before installing, can I do a complete format of Disk 0 ?
 
Disk 0 has the OS in partition C:\    and Boot (system reserved) in another partition (E:\)
 
Disk 0 has only these two volumes (or partitions)
 
Can I ?:
 
C:\Windows\system32>diskpart
DISKPART> list disk
DISKPART> select disk 0
DISKPART> clean all
DISKPART> exit
C:\Windows\system32>format FS=NTFS
 
Of course, each entry receives a reply from Windows.
But does this work?
Is the syntax correct?
Should the format command be on DISKPART instead of \system32?
If so, the exit cmd would be wrong and should be eliminated?
 
Any help is extremely appreciated
 
Thank you
 
 


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#2 OldPhil

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 07:49 PM

Idea! go on the SSD makers site they should have a program that will do what you want.


Honesty & Integrity Above All!


#3 JohnC_21

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 07:50 PM

If you motherboard has UEFI instead of an older BIOS I would add one command after clean all

 

convert GPT

 

Note: Clean all will zero out the drive. the Clean command will only delete the partition table and set the drive up for a clean install. This is sufficient for most people.

 

It is not necessary to create a partition as during the install Windows 7 will automatically create the necessary GPT partitions or MBR partitions if the computer has an older BIOS and not UEFI.



#4 passacaglia

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 09:49 PM

Thanks for the info.

My Bios is quite new

Gigabyte H87M-D3H   

http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=4492#ov

 

Why should I convert to GPT if the drive is much smaller than 2TB and has only 2 partitions

Drive 1 is GPT with 3TB and 2 partitions. But that's not where the OS is on.

 

Oh, and the SSD manufacturer is Corsair

 

Thanks anyway



#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 10:24 AM

The size of the disk does not matter. Only a GPT formatted disk can boot from a UEFI computer.

 

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/dn640535(v=vs.85).aspx

 

  • Systems that support UEFI require that boot partition must reside on a GPT disk. Other hard disks can be either MBR or GPT.

     

     






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