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Electric Dusters & Static


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#1 NoviceTechie

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 11:19 PM

Hi,

 

I've been using a DataVac ED-500 Electric Duster (https://www.metrovacworld.com/product/DataVac_Electric_Duster/overview) for a while now, maybe 3 years or so.It's branded as an Electric Duster and its product page states it's meant to be use for electronics.

 

Recently I saw the manufacturer started selling another model ED500-ESD (https://www.metrovacworld.com/product/DataVac_ESD_Safe_Electric_Duster/overview).Apparently it's an anti-static model.

 

 

Since 2012, I've read people on these forums had been using the ED-500 base model with computers. But now I'm a bit confused. Have we all been using a model that was actually generating static, or causing damage to our electronics?

 

Pardon me in advance - I don't know much about static, or its corresponding physics.

 

Thanks in advance for any help.

 



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#2 dc3

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 10:54 AM

This type of vacuum cleaner is intended for use with electronics as it does not generate static electricity like a conventional vacuum will.  Both models you have listed should be pretty much the same.


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#3 NoviceTechie

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 01:33 PM

I think you're right. I was curious why they released 2 different models.  Granted the first one is from 2003. The new ESD version is from 2015.

 

The units look the same. Both already utilize grounded plugs. The only thing that seems to differentiate them are their accessories. Apparently the newer version has antistatic plastic?

 

I appreciate the response, Arachibutyrophobia. Thank you.



#4 mjd420nova

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 08:14 PM

ESD was just a way to get a new model to market.  A buzz word  ESD



#5 dc3

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 01:14 AM

ESD - Electrostatic Discharge is real, not a "buz word".

 

Most of us have experienced walking across the floor in the winter, reaching for the door knob only to receive visual spark and shock that literally hurt.  Do you know the voltage threshold necessary to produce that kind of shock?  How about between 2,000 and 3,000 volts!  Know how many volts it takes to kill a RAM module?  How about 10 volts.


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