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Upgrading the boot drive SSD to larger SSD with Windows 10


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#1 trog69

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 03:55 AM

Good morning. I am purchasing a 1tb SSD to replace the 256gb drive I use now, as I've completely run out of room with the games I have now, and have another 100gbs+ worth of games I want to install. So, my question is, do I need to do anything other than just replacing the SSD and then installing Windows 10 onto it? I've read about "partitioning" but I know nothing about that, and I hope the OS itself handles that. I don't need anything already stored, as it is mainly just the games I play, and I already had music and pictures installing to the 2tb HDD D: drive. 

 

Thanks for any help on this. I have a couple of days before the new SSD arrives, so I'm hoping I know what to do once it gets here. 



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 06:16 AM

In some cases, a BIOS upgrade/update is suggested...but the drive will work (just like a SATA hard drive) without such.  Maximum performance, if desired, can be obtained by doing the suggested/recommended BIOS update, if such is documented.

 

A decent summary of some considerations that aren't necessarily important to me (I don't enable TRIM and I don't enable AHCI) can be found at https://forums.anandtech.com/threads/new-to-ssds-read-this-first-before-asking-questions-updated-07-17-2011.2069761/#post-29731982 .

 

I suggest that you create two partitions on your SSD if you intend to store much more than Windows on it....you can create a data partitioh for such storage after you have installed Windows and booted into it.  This will allow you to run chkdsk /r (when necessary) on the data partition or the Windows partition with the greatest efficiency without running it on the entire drive.  Partitions are like rooms within a house...it's a lot simpler and quicker to clean a room...than it is to clean the entire house at one time.

 

If you have a retail copy of Win 10, it will include the tools necessary to create the Windows partition for a clean install.  If you are going clone or restore a backup image to the new drive...the software used will reflect instructions on how to move the contents from one drive to the other.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 28 October 2016 - 06:23 AM.


#3 dc3

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 10:25 AM

Since you have a 2TB storage drive I don't see any advantage in adding another partition.  The installation will create two partitions automatically, one for the System Reserve partition which contains the Boot Manager code and the Boot Configuration Database.  This partition is 100Mb in size.  The rest of the capacity can be used as one partition for the operating system and the programs you want installed there.
 
If this is a custom build and you are using the same installation media that was used originally I don't see any problem.  If this is a OEM installation you may want to consider using software like Macrium Reflect to clone the entire drive and use this to install the operating system.  The reason for cloning the whole drive is so the System Reserve partition will be included.  The computer will not boot into Windows without this partition.


Edited by dc3, 28 October 2016 - 10:26 AM.

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 trog69

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 02:28 AM

Thanks so much for the quick responses. This is a custom build by IBuyPower PC, and is almost exclusively for gaming/music. I am hugely ignorant of how to manipulate things like this SSD partitioning, but I had to re-install Windows 10 after I received the PC because the OS was freezing up,  and the  re-install fixed that. I also vaguely remember, during the re-install process, that it would automagically partition the OS, perhaps, as Arachibutyrophobia describes, with 100mb for some purpose, and the rest for the OS etc. If that's the case, hopefully all I need do is plug the new drive in place of the old and re-install Windows. 

 

I am scared to death to do anything with the BIOS. I couldn't get a straight answer from the Asrock support people nor from the forum, as it seems they assume everyone knows the difference between Flashing and other means, so not even understanding the terminology used is not a good sign. Thus, I still have the v1 of this BIOS. I even grabbed a flash drive, but  never got detailed instructions on how exactly to update the darned BIOS. 

 

Now I'm scared to even attempt this upgrade, Could I just put the old drive back in if things blow up? Other than a book to read, everything entertainment is wrapped up in this PC, and I haven't watched tv in 30 years. I'm a mess. hehehe



#5 hamluis

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 08:20 AM

If you are afraid to install/use the SSD that you have purchased...you can simply move your games from your present hard drive which reflectes your Windows install...to the rather large data storage drive which you seem to have.  There is no reason that those games need to be on the hard drive containing the Windows install.

 

Louis



#6 dc3

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 08:24 AM

You shouldn't have any problem doing a fresh installation of Windows 10 using the installation disc.  Just make sure that you have removed or disconnected any other storage devices, ssd/hdd, flash drive, etc.

 

I wouldn't worry about the BIOS, you can go to the motherboard manufacturer's web site to see if there is a BIOS update suggested.  If there isn't I would leave sleeping dogs lay.


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#7 trog69

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 04:05 AM

If you are afraid to install/use the SSD that you have purchased...you can simply move your games from your present hard drive which reflectes your Windows install...to the rather large data storage drive which you seem to have.  There is no reason that those games need to be on the hard drive containing the Windows install.

 

Louis

How is that? I have a friend that tried using his mech. hard drive for Fallout 4, but the entering/exiting areas, as well as the start of the game, slowed to a crawl, so that he deleted other games just to fit FO4 back onto his SSD drive. I've also  read many articles explaining why massive, open-world RPGs-the games I play almost exclusively- gain quite a bit of speed with an SSD over a mech. hard drive, not to mention the heat from a mech. vs a SSD, is something to be considered, though not all that much of a difference.

 

Obviously, from my comment here, I am very ignorant of how game files are manipulated via SSD vs HDD, particularly the Hybrid drives, so I am asking rather than trying to be a pita.  



#8 hamluis

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 07:54 AM

I do not game...so I cannot address any issues that may or may not exist about such.

 

AFAIK...the only items that need to be installed on the Windows partition for facility of use...are programs.  I (perhaps mistakenly) do not consider a game to be a program.

 

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Louis


Edited by hamluis, 30 October 2016 - 07:55 AM.





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