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INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE After Cloning Drive


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#1 johnwinds

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 05:11 AM

Hi everyone,

 

I have a new Kangaroo Mini PC (with dock) and wanted to use an SSD attached via the dock for Windows (instead of the built-in eMMC). I used TrueImage to clone the eMMC drive (with Windows 10) to the SSD.

 

When booting up on the SSD, it comes up with an INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE error. Just after cloning, it let's me choose safe mode, and Windows does start up in safe mode.

 

However, it will not boot without safe mode. I tried several things using the command line recovery tool:

 

bootrec /FixBoot (these were intially returning "the system cannot find the file specified", until I made some changes with bcdedit

bootrec /FixMbr

bootrec /RebuildBcd (this returns 0 identified installations)

bootsect /force /nt60 ALL

deleting the eMMC partitions using diskpart -> clean

assigning the drive letters to C: and U: (for the fat32 partiton) via diskpart

changing the partitions to C: and U: via bcdedit

I couldn't delete C:\Boot\Bcd as some posts suggests, since I do not have a C:\Boot directory

 

Does anyone have any idea how to fix this? The fact that it loads via safe mode suggests that there isn't any hardware issue. Could it be a driver issue?

 

Thanks!

 



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#2 technonymous

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 09:52 AM

When you make a clone of C: with True Image you need to include the 100mb system partition and the 450mb (winre) partition. You cannot have two drives connected at the same time with the same OS.



#3 johnwinds

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 04:06 PM

When you make a clone of C: with True Image you need to include the 100mb system partition and the 450mb (winre) partition. You cannot have two drives connected at the same time with the same OS.

 

I cloned the whole drive (including all 3 partitions) via True Image, and then I deleted all the partitions off the original drive using diskpart->clean.

 

I cannot physically remove the original drive as it is built into the device (32 eMMC).



#4 technonymous

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Posted 25 October 2016 - 06:53 PM

Ok when you create a clone of the hd it creates a True Image (image) that can only be used to restore to a internal hd back to it's original state or to a new internal HD. You can't boot from the True Image backup directly if that is what you're trying to do. Generally how it works, you boot from a True Image live cd that has a copy of True Image on it and you select a source disk (usb drive) and a restore disk (internal eMMC drive) and away it goes, it'll restore the eMMC internal hd back to it's original state.

 

By the sound of it you want to use the image off the internal eMMC and place it on the USB drive & try and boot from it while attached to a USB port. Windows is not going work that way. That is essentially trying to do the same thing as booting a live cd or live usb of linux. The structure of Windows is not setup to do that sort of thing. A far as removing the drive from the eMMC I imagine it can be done, just not easily done by the average person. Some chassis require special tools to take them apart. If you want to replace the drive, then I suggest taking it to a computer shop that is equipped to help you achieve this.



#5 johnwinds

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 04:32 AM

Ok when you create a clone of the hd it creates a True Image (image) that can only be used to restore to a internal hd back to it's original state or to a new internal HD. You can't boot from the True Image backup directly if that is what you're trying to do. Generally how it works, you boot from a True Image live cd that has a copy of True Image on it and you select a source disk (usb drive) and a restore disk (internal eMMC drive) and away it goes, it'll restore the eMMC internal hd back to it's original state.

 

By the sound of it you want to use the image off the internal eMMC and place it on the USB drive & try and boot from it while attached to a USB port. Windows is not going work that way. That is essentially trying to do the same thing as booting a live cd or live usb of linux. The structure of Windows is not setup to do that sort of thing. A far as removing the drive from the eMMC I imagine it can be done, just not easily done by the average person. Some chassis require special tools to take them apart. If you want to replace the drive, then I suggest taking it to a computer shop that is equipped to help you achieve this.

 

TrueImage has a tool to clone between disks which is meant to copy entire disks (sector by sector). This is used to upgrade from one disk to another.

 

I cloned the eMMC disk to the new SSD disk and now I'm trying to boot from the SSD disk.



#6 FreeBooter

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 07:00 AM

Hi everyone,

 

I have a new Kangaroo Mini PC (with dock) and wanted to use an SSD attached via the dock for Windows (instead of the built-in eMMC). I used TrueImage to clone the eMMC drive (with Windows 10) to the SSD.

 

When booting up on the SSD, it comes up with an INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE error. Just after cloning, it let's me choose safe mode, and Windows does start up in safe mode.

 

However, it will not boot without safe mode. I tried several things using the command line recovery tool:

 

bootrec /FixBoot (these were intially returning "the system cannot find the file specified", until I made some changes with bcdedit

bootrec /FixMbr

bootrec /RebuildBcd (this returns 0 identified installations)

bootsect /force /nt60 ALL

deleting the eMMC partitions using diskpart -> clean

assigning the drive letters to C: and U: (for the fat32 partiton) via diskpart

changing the partitions to C: and U: via bcdedit

I couldn't delete C:\Boot\Bcd as some posts suggests, since I do not have a C:\Boot directory

 

Does anyone have any idea how to fix this? The fact that it loads via safe mode suggests that there isn't any hardware issue. Could it be a driver issue?

 

Thanks!

 

You said you don't have Boot directory on C: partition how about other partitions and does BCD file exist within Boot folder?


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#7 johnwinds

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 08:25 AM

 

Hi everyone,

 

I have a new Kangaroo Mini PC (with dock) and wanted to use an SSD attached via the dock for Windows (instead of the built-in eMMC). I used TrueImage to clone the eMMC drive (with Windows 10) to the SSD.

 

When booting up on the SSD, it comes up with an INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE error. Just after cloning, it let's me choose safe mode, and Windows does start up in safe mode.

 

However, it will not boot without safe mode. I tried several things using the command line recovery tool:

 

bootrec /FixBoot (these were intially returning "the system cannot find the file specified", until I made some changes with bcdedit

bootrec /FixMbr

bootrec /RebuildBcd (this returns 0 identified installations)

bootsect /force /nt60 ALL

deleting the eMMC partitions using diskpart -> clean

assigning the drive letters to C: and U: (for the fat32 partiton) via diskpart

changing the partitions to C: and U: via bcdedit

I couldn't delete C:\Boot\Bcd as some posts suggests, since I do not have a C:\Boot directory

 

Does anyone have any idea how to fix this? The fact that it loads via safe mode suggests that there isn't any hardware issue. Could it be a driver issue?

 

Thanks!

 

You said you don't have Boot directory on C: partition how about other partitions and does BCD file exist within Boot folder?

 

 

 

I had to assign a drive letter to the SYSTEM partition in order to see what's on there (U:). It has a U:\EFI\Boot directory, and within that there is a file called bootx64.efi, but not a BCD file.

 

Here are some screenshots:

 

UHqwttp.jpg

 

 

 

woVr2yQ.jpg



#8 FreeBooter

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 11:29 AM

The INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE bug check has a value of 0x0000007B. This bug check indicates that the Microsoft Windows operating system has lost access to the system partition during startup. For more information and resolution visit below website link.

 

 

Bug Check 0x7B: INACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE

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#9 technonymous

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 01:06 PM

 

Ok when you create a clone of the hd it creates a True Image (image) that can only be used to restore to a internal hd back to it's original state or to a new internal HD. You can't boot from the True Image backup directly if that is what you're trying to do. Generally how it works, you boot from a True Image live cd that has a copy of True Image on it and you select a source disk (usb drive) and a restore disk (internal eMMC drive) and away it goes, it'll restore the eMMC internal hd back to it's original state.

 

By the sound of it you want to use the image off the internal eMMC and place it on the USB drive & try and boot from it while attached to a USB port. Windows is not going work that way. That is essentially trying to do the same thing as booting a live cd or live usb of linux. The structure of Windows is not setup to do that sort of thing. A far as removing the drive from the eMMC I imagine it can be done, just not easily done by the average person. Some chassis require special tools to take them apart. If you want to replace the drive, then I suggest taking it to a computer shop that is equipped to help you achieve this.

 

TrueImage has a tool to clone between disks which is meant to copy entire disks (sector by sector). This is used to upgrade from one disk to another.

 

I cloned the eMMC disk to the new SSD disk and now I'm trying to boot from the SSD disk.

 

Yes I know that True Image does all that. The problem is that you took a snapshot of a OS and then changed it's location physically. Now the bcd has no idea where C: is.



#10 johnwinds

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 06:45 PM

 

 

Ok when you create a clone of the hd it creates a True Image (image) that can only be used to restore to a internal hd back to it's original state or to a new internal HD. You can't boot from the True Image backup directly if that is what you're trying to do. Generally how it works, you boot from a True Image live cd that has a copy of True Image on it and you select a source disk (usb drive) and a restore disk (internal eMMC drive) and away it goes, it'll restore the eMMC internal hd back to it's original state.

 

By the sound of it you want to use the image off the internal eMMC and place it on the USB drive & try and boot from it while attached to a USB port. Windows is not going work that way. That is essentially trying to do the same thing as booting a live cd or live usb of linux. The structure of Windows is not setup to do that sort of thing. A far as removing the drive from the eMMC I imagine it can be done, just not easily done by the average person. Some chassis require special tools to take them apart. If you want to replace the drive, then I suggest taking it to a computer shop that is equipped to help you achieve this.

 

TrueImage has a tool to clone between disks which is meant to copy entire disks (sector by sector). This is used to upgrade from one disk to another.

 

I cloned the eMMC disk to the new SSD disk and now I'm trying to boot from the SSD disk.

 

Yes I know that True Image does all that. The problem is that you took a snapshot of a OS and then changed it's location physically. Now the bcd has no idea where C: is.

 

 

Yes, I'm aware of that. Hence, my attempts to use "bcdedit" which are described in my initial post.

 

I'm trying to get some help to get this working. I know it can be done as I've done this on two other Kangaroo PCs.



#11 FreeBooter

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 07:05 PM

Copy critical boot files to the system partition and to create a new system BCD store.

Open the Command Prompt and type below command.

Bcdboot 
C:\windows /s   U:   /f  All

Restart your computer.


Posted Image


#12 johnwinds

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 09:48 PM

Copy critical boot files to the system partition and to create a new system BCD store.

Open the Command Prompt and type below command.

Bcdboot 
C:\windows /s   U:   /f  All

Restart your computer.

 

Initially running this command just returned the help options, as for some reason every time I go into the recovery command line after a reboot, Windows forgets the U: drive and there is no drive letter for that partition.

 

I assigned the U drive letter again and the command ran successfully.

 

After rebooting, I got the usual Inaccessible Boot Device screen. But now, after it automatically reboots from that, I can't get into the recovery options. Instead I get the "Your PC couldn't start properly" message. Pressing the Windows key just gives me a blank screen.

 

HuiSzBE.jpg

 

 

qQhsxgw.jpg

 

PaWASrZ.jpg

 

L5B7hRc.jpg



#13 johnwinds

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 06:43 AM

Thanks for everyone who posted help. I finally got this working by using the Restore Windows option in the recovery menu.



#14 technonymous

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 03:49 PM

Thanks for everyone who posted help. I finally got this working by using the Restore Windows option in the recovery menu.

Cool glad to hear it. I am curious though to see how it performs and works out for you and how windows fixed the bcd for you. That's the hard part editing the bcd with the right device identifier.



#15 FreeBooter

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 04:57 PM

Initially running this command just returned the help options, as for some reason every time I go into the recovery command line after a reboot, Windows forgets the U: drive and there is no drive letter for that partition.

 

I assigned the U drive letter again and the command ran successfully.

 

After rebooting, I got the usual Inaccessible Boot Device screen. But now, after it automatically reboots from that, I can't get into the recovery options. Instead I get the "Your PC couldn't start properly" message. Pressing the Windows key just gives me a blank screen.

 

The command i give you will display help screen when you either type command wrong or you have not correct syntax like U: partition not exist.

You issue is System partition was not mark as active that is the reason Windows never assigned a drive letter to System partition.


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