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Running old WinXP and Win7 programs on Win10 and future CPU's.


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#1 nicologic

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 04:54 PM

Hello everyone.
 
This might be a silly question yet that's my level when it comes to OS.
 
I have one computer which is almost 10 years old and still running on WinXP. I've been keeping that old PC because I use a few programs that date from late 2000`s. They're all Win7 compatible too, but that's it, there were no further updates for the versions I have. One of them (ProTools 8 LE) depends on external hardware whose driver is only compatible with XP and Win7. I've never planned to replace that PC for a newer one as it works perfectly, but I recently read something on future Intel and AMD processors about being Win10 only. Thus, I am not sure If I should buy a new PC now that Skylake's still are Win7 compatible and ensure using my programs for, let's say, 10 more years. I am worried about a possible breakdown of either my Core2 CPU or Motherboard in the next very few years (which would not certainly be a surprise coming from a computer set a decade ago) and not being able to use my programs any more, despite buying a new PC. As far as I know, modern versions of Windows feature the so called "compatibility mode" feature, which fools the software into thinking it’s running on the older Windows it requires. Also, there's the possibility of installing either a original XP or XPmode into a virtual machine, but will this solutions work for future CPU's that are supposed to be Win10 compatible only? Maybe it's a bit of stupid question, but it's messing with me...
 
Thank you all.


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 05:53 PM

I'm pretty sure you will be able to run a virtual machine of XP on the new processors but it's a good question. I would think that the virtual software would emulate hardware such that XP would be able to run.

 

One of the most important things to do is create a complete disk image of your XP hard drive. This would allow you to recover the image to a new drive in case your current one fails avoiding all the headaches of reinstalling your programs and any OS updates. Programs that can do this are

 

Macrium Free -  Only for non-commercial use

 

Todo Backup Free

 

Aomei Backupper Free


Edited by JohnC_21, 24 October 2016 - 02:09 PM.


#3 nicologic

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 01:56 PM

I'm pretty sure you will be able to run a virtual machine of XP on the new processors but it's a good question. I would think that the virtual software would emulate hardware such that XP would be able to run.

 

One of the most important things to do is create a complete disk image of your XP hard drive. This would allow you to recover the image to a new drive in case your current one failes avoiding all the headaches of reinstalling your programs and any OS updates. Programs that can do this are

 

Macrium Free -  Only for non-commercial use

 

Todo Backup Free

 

Aomei Backupper Free

 

 
Thanks for the info. I just found this: http://www.howtogeek.com/219782/is-windows-10-backwards-compatible-with-your-existing-software/ , where it can be read "...Any application or hardware that requires an old driver will be a problem. If you depend on an application that interfaces with a Windows XP-era hardware device and the manufacturer has never provided a driver that works on Windows 7, you’re likely in trouble. On the other hand, if there is a driver that does work on Windows 7, your hardware should continue working properly on Windows 10", so there's some hope... But your point about creating a disk image is something I will take into some serious consideration, I had no idea about that.
 
Thanks for the advice and the links!





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