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Make Profile AS POWERFUL as W10 Hidden Admin?


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#1 SPCR

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 12:52 PM

I often move files from other computer using a SATA DOCK, Whenever I go to look at F:/Users/Owner (or whatever drive letter and profile name) it says I do not have permission. I have to right click and take ownership and that takes a good 10mins. BUT if I am logged into the hidden (now activated) admin account on windows 10 I can enter this folder with no errors or prompts. I am using W10 PRO, I have gone into lusrmgr.msc, and added my account to administrator but I still dont get to enter the folder like the admin does. Any ideas what I can?> Thanks 



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#2 technonymous

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 02:04 PM

Users in admin group do not have access to each others user folders, or the built in Administrator. The built in Administrator needs that higher elevated access to all files and folders because it is needed in a recovery situation, change passwords, or mess with encrypted files and certs.



#3 SPCR

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 02:12 PM

So essentially - That is normal and there is nothing I can do about it. Just log out and log into the admin account to move these files, or use take ownership too. Thank you



#4 technonymous

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 02:38 PM

Yes, it is by design. Why are you moving files? Are you moving them to a new machine??



#5 technonymous

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 02:40 PM

Anyways, I have to run. I got 1hr meeting and 1hr drive ahead of me.



#6 MadmanRB

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 02:46 PM

There are good reasons why those admin files are locked off, after all you dont want to throw the C:/windows directory into the trash bin now do you?


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#7 SPCR

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 03:15 PM

I am backing up files from other ppls hard drives before doing a reformat. Thank you all for the help. GOD BLESS



#8 technonymous

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 08:53 PM

I always use the MSFT migration tool. It retains file permissions, EFS encrypted files and certs tied to the account and you can encrypt the migration backup with the tool. It works good when user profiles and sensitive secret information is being moved to a new system. Helps make it more seamless without all the guess work.



#9 SPCR

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 09:38 AM

That does sound like it would make things easier. I will look into that. Thank you 

 

Most of the time the computer I am working on does not boot up for some reason or another. Rather than chase down the boot issue I just pull the hard drive and do a full hardware test, dock the drive on another PC, then copy all the data from the hard drive, wipe it, fresh install of Windows, Scan the data, and transfer it all back onto the same hard drive with the fresh reinstall of Windows. 



#10 technonymous

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 10:41 AM

Depending on the problem at hand I do all that as a last resort. Windows has come a long ways with repair tools like DISM and non destructive repairs with Windows 10 disk. A lot of time a user will get into dual booting and completely trash things not understanding how all that works. Not having a backup or restore point doesn't help either.



#11 SPCR

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Posted 24 October 2016 - 10:54 AM

I know what you mean about repairing the OS to boot, but everything I work on is cheap, low end stuff that comes loaded down with bloatware and trials and factory junk to the point that a fresh OS install is the best way to go. If I see the same PC again after I did a reformat then I will perform the recovery steps. 






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