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UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME STOP: 0x000000ED


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#1 britechguy

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 09:12 PM

Hello All,

 

The Windows XP desktop machine of a friend suddenly started throwing a BSOD today with what's noted in the subject line.

 

After the stop message and hex code there is:  (0x8A34D900, 0x0000006, 0x00000000. 0x00000000)

 

I tried looking in BIOS regarding caching and shadowing as the text in the screen suggested and found nothing.

 

The machine gets through its "black & white text" screens and the Windows XP splash screen and progress bar both appear and the progress bar cycles a number of times before the BSOD appears.

 

I'm presuming there is corruption of the boot sector of some sort, but this particular message is a new one on me.

 

Suggestions as to what one might do next that might cause subsequent boot attempts to go back to being successful?


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


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#2 technonymous

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 03:05 PM

It does sound like a damaged file system or corrupt hd.

 

Check the drives data strap at both ends.

Bios battery could have died and altered other UDMA, HCI, IDE settings things like that.

Check drive corruption.

Try safeboot and check msconfig startup.

Try rolling back to early restore point.

Try a chksdk scan



#3 britechguy

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 09:41 PM

technonymous, 

 

         Thanks much for the response.

 

         I have absolutely no idea how one checks "the drive's data strap at both ends" nor how one car run something like chkdsk unless I was able to boot into windows one way or another and, up to now, I have not been able to manage that.  I have an old XP machine from which I could create a system recovery/restore/rescue disc, though.

 

          Right now I am away from this machine and will be for a few days.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#4 old rocker

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Posted 22 October 2016 - 10:42 AM

britechguy
 
I have had much success with fixing Unmountable Boot Volume doing this...
 
Verify he/she has a current backuo i=of their data.
 
A. Create your "system recovery/restore/rescue disc".
 
B. Boot to the media you've created.
 
C. You should be at the Windows XP setup screen (Welcome to Setup.)
 
1. To launch the recovery console press thr letter R
a. Select the number corresponding to the O/S you wish to work with (most likely 1.)
b. If asked for the Admin password, enter it now.
 
2. Type fixmbr \Device\HardDisk0 * Note: you can type fixmbr without parameters if you are working with a single drive.
a. (You may be prompted to continue.)
b. ref. http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/bootcons_fixmbr.mspx?mfr=true
 
3. Next Type fixboot c: Note: you can type fixboot without parameters if you are working with a single drive.
a. ref. http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/bootcons_fixboot.mspx?mfr=true
 
 
Unless the drive is physically destroyed You should now be able to boot into Windows XP as normal.
 
Old Rocker


#5 britechguy

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 02:51 PM

Old Rocker,

 

          Thanks very much.  I hope to get to this later this week.  Life has suddenly gotten very busy.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 03:03 PM

You can download an iso of the XP Recovery Console to repair and do a chkdsk here. I also second backing up the data before attempting a chkdsk.

 

In addition to what Old Rocker posted I have found this guide to be helpful.



#7 britechguy

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 03:05 PM

Thanks John.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#8 hamluis

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 05:45 PM

FWIW:  I don't believe that error coding is for "unmountable boot volume".

 

How to receive help diagnosing Blue Screens and Windows crashes - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/topic176011.html

 

Louis



#9 britechguy

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 05:53 PM

I can assure you that this is precisely the error code collection that was on that BSOD.  I copy once and check about 3 times before dismissing the screen.

 

It appears that I missed typing a single leading zero on the 0x00000006 item above.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#10 britechguy

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 01:16 PM

Just following up, and the results so far are definitely not good.

 

Have booted into the Recovery Console.  If you type "fixmbr" without any parameter it just comes back to the C:\> prompt.  If I type it with the parameter \Device\HardDisk0 the message, "The old master boot record cannot be read," comes up immediately.

 

fixboot c: results in the message, "FIXBOOT cannot find the system drive, or the drive specified is not valid."

 

chkdsk /r results in the message, "The volume appears to contain one or more unrecoverable problems."

 

 

What's even more interesting is when I go into the Recovery Console I am never prompted for which Windows installation I want to work with and very quickly get the C:\> prompt.  If I then do a dir command this results in the message, "There is no floppy disc or CD in the drive."  This is all the weirder because if I don't boot from the CD the system does begin trying to boot Windows XP, so something has to be there.  The client tells me that Windows is on C: and a logical drive D: had been created for data.  

 

What next, if anything?
 


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#11 JohnC_21

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 01:29 PM

when I go into the Recovery Console I am never prompted for which Windows installation I want to work with

 

Not good. I would recommend recovering any data on the drive and then do a reinstall after checking the hard drive for any issues. Hirens Boot CD should be able to do that easily enough or even a linux disk.



#12 britechguy

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 09:13 AM

John,

 

          Thanks for the advice.   I believe at this point we are going to throw in the towel on anything except, possibly, trying to do a user data recovery.  The client was using backup software but it appears that her cleaning person accidentally knocked out the USB cord to the drive about two weeks ago.  I am hopeful that we might be able to use slightly older backups.

 

           The worst part of it all is that the client has Verizon as her ISP and has used Verizon e-mail with Outlook Express, which means POP access and no synchronization of contacts.  Trying to recover her contacts at this point is likely to be a challenge, but I was able to dig up one of her most critical ones via strategic web searching.

 

            This is yet another demonstration of why I urge clients not to continue using unsupported software and to change from POP to IMAP access.  When disaster strikes having server-side "backup" of your e-mail messages and contacts is a great blessing.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#13 old rocker

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 10:44 AM

britechguy
 
Just another thought...
 
Are you familiar with or have you used TestDisk?
 
Quite a tool for recovering lost partitions.
 
Concentrate on Deep Search, I have often used that portion of the program and was successful!
 
Hope this will work for you.
 
Old Rocker


#14 britechguy

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 10:58 AM

OId Rocker,

 

          No, I'm not familiar with this tool, but thanks for posting a pointer to it.

 

          It certainly is helpful to have another proverbial arrow in the quiver and the fact that it's open-source is an added bonus.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#15 JohnC_21

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 11:21 AM

Old Rocker brings up a good point with TestDisk. There is Testdisk for Windows or it it available on the UBCD using Parted Magic. If the drive is connected via a USB adapter or enclosure run Testdisk and under the Advanced Option select Boot and see if Testdisk verifies the Boot Sector as good.

 

http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk_Step_By_Step

 

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