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Win95 IDE Drive Tried to Clone but got Missing Operating System Instead


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#1 waterbattle

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 09:48 AM

Hello everyone, I am new to the IT world, I just graduated and got my first job, and would like your help. So this is what my superiors gave me as my first big task. They wanted me to clone this Windows 95 machine that has a software installed that controls the environment in several rooms. So thinking that this was going to only take me 10 -20 minutes, I find out that it wasn't. At first I used Macrium free version to clone the hard drive, however when I plugged the cloned drive into the computer and started it up it showed that "C:\ Missing Operating System". I just thought maybe the software wasn't good so I used AOMEI Backupper and did the Disk Clone option and got the same result "C:\ Missing Operating System". Was there a step I was missing anywhere or was it the software like I thought it was? I am trying not to incur expenses while I do this, mostly because my superior doesn't want to use money if possible, but if you guys say I have to buy a license for a specific software then I have no choice.



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 10:13 AM

Legally you are only allowed to use Aomei as Macrium Free is for non-commercial use only. Aomei can be used for commercial use.

 

How did you connect the drives? Was the cloned drive blank before cloning?

 

Are both drives IDE? Win98 does not have SATA control drivers. 

 

Is the cloned drive going to be installed into the same computer? Windows 98 will not boot from a UEFI enabled computer unless Legacy Boot or CSM boot is enabled. 

 

It's possible the cloned drive is bad. You can check the drive on another computer using Seatools for Windows. Use Data Lifeguard for a WD drive.

 

 



#3 waterbattle

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 08:00 AM

Sorry, didn't mean to confuse. I meant the Home version of Macrium fully paid license and everything.

 

I connected the drives using the StarTech USB 2.0 to IDE SATA Adapter and connected it to my work laptop.

 

Both drives are IDE.

 

Yes, the cloned drive is going to be installed onto the same computer. I'm not sure about the UEFI on Windows 98 but the machine I am running on is a Windows 95 computer, not sure if that makes a difference.

 

I don't believe the drive is bad since I tried it on two separate drives and it both resulted in the same thing, but I will check the drive using the tools you provided.



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 10:09 AM

Try doing a clone using sector by sector copy. Make sure the target drive is blank.

 

If that fails then create a live Clonezilla disk and use that to clone the drives. Use device to device 

 

If the clone using Clonezilla fails then instead of cloning create a disk image to an external drive. Remove the source drive and replace with the target drive. Restore the disk image on the external drive to the new drive. Use device to image.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gr4T47_rkLw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41tTudaQb0I
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS6VhLDw-io


#5 Eyesee

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 05:11 PM

Did you FDISK the drive that you are cloning to and set the partition as active before formatting it?

If the partition is not set to active using FDISK it will not boot.

When you format the drive be sure to use the /s switch to transfer system files to it

The syntax is:

Format (drive letter:) /s

After you do that, then clone it


In the beginning there was the command line.

#6 waterbattle

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:32 AM

Did you FDISK the drive that you are cloning to and set the partition as active before formatting it?

If the partition is not set to active using FDISK it will not boot.

When you format the drive be sure to use the /s switch to transfer system files to it

The syntax is:

Format (drive letter:) /s

After you do that, then clone it

 

My manager has been saying the same thing as well. He said that maybe the partition is not set to be bootable or something along those lines. How do I do a FDISK? Can I do it while the drives are connected to my laptop via USB to IDE adapter?



#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 04:34 PM

As an experiment I downloaded clonezilla and created a disk image of a 1GB Windows 98 HDD pulled from an old 486 computer to a USB external drive using a USB adapter. I restored the image on the external drive to a blank non-formatted 2GB drive. I installed the 2GB drive in the 486 and it booted fine. The only drawback was the computer still saw the disk as 1GB which is normal when imaging to a larger capacity drive. To take advantage of the full 2GB I would need to expand the partition using a third party partition manager such as Partition Wizard. 


Edited by JohnC_21, 21 October 2016 - 09:01 PM.


#8 Eyesee

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 11:58 PM

Your boss has given you a challenge, probably to see how well you would do with it.

You have to think old school.

What I would do is to boot to a Windows 95 startup disk from a floppy disk drive with the recipient drive only attached

Then FDISK the recipient drive and make the partition active. Reboot

Then format the drive with the /s switch to make the drive bootable

Boot to the drive to ensure that it is

Once the recipient drive is prepared, disconnect the cdrom  drive from the computer and attach the recipient drive to there set as a master (dont forget the master and slave settings on IDE drives, do NOT set them to cable select, set the jumpers yourself)

Boot to the original drive

Use the XCOPY command with the /s /h switchches to copy it over

Pour yourself a stiff drink and hope it works

 

Being old school, that is what I would do


Edited by Eyesee, 22 October 2016 - 12:10 AM.

In the beginning there was the command line.

#9 waterbattle

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Posted 26 October 2016 - 06:47 AM

Hi everyone,

 

I haven't been able to use your methods since it got really busy at work, so I am going to try them out later today. I hope it works (fingers crossed).



#10 waterbattle

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 08:59 AM

Your boss has given you a challenge, probably to see how well you would do with it.

You have to think old school.

What I would do is to boot to a Windows 95 startup disk from a floppy disk drive with the recipient drive only attached

Then FDISK the recipient drive and make the partition active. Reboot

Then format the drive with the /s switch to make the drive bootable

Boot to the drive to ensure that it is

Once the recipient drive is prepared, disconnect the cdrom  drive from the computer and attach the recipient drive to there set as a master (dont forget the master and slave settings on IDE drives, do NOT set them to cable select, set the jumpers yourself)

Boot to the original drive

Use the XCOPY command with the /s /h switchches to copy it over

Pour yourself a stiff drink and hope it works

 

Being old school, that is what I would do

 

 

Hi Eyesee,

 

What do you mean by /s switch? been trying it for a while now and it just tells me it's a bad command or file name



#11 Eyesee

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 02:28 PM

http://www.computerhope.com/msdos.htm

 

Your boss gave you this as a challenge.

Think old school and only use what was available in the Windows 95 era and you will solve the problem


Edited by Eyesee, 27 October 2016 - 10:12 PM.

In the beginning there was the command line.

#12 Thomas_JK

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 06:40 AM




Your boss has given you a challenge, probably to see how well you would do with it.
You have to think old school.
What I would do is to boot to a Windows 95 startup disk from a floppy disk drive with the recipient drive only attached
Then FDISK the recipient drive and make the partition active. Reboot
Then format the drive with the /s switch to make the drive bootable
Boot to the drive to ensure that it is
Once the recipient drive is prepared, disconnect the cdrom  drive from the computer and attach the recipient drive to there set as a master (dont forget the master and slave settings on IDE drives, do NOT set them to cable select, set the jumpers yourself)
Boot to the original drive
Use the XCOPY command with the /s /h switchches to copy it over
Pour yourself a stiff drink and hope it works
 
Being old school, that is what I would do

 
 
Hi Eyesee,
 
What do you mean by /s switch? been trying it for a while now and it just tells me it's a bad command or file name
Hi,

/s switch transfers the system files to the formatted disk to make it bootable. Command should be issued, " format c: /s ".

#13 technonymous

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 05:52 PM

Oh, and you may have to activate the drive using fdisk or diskpart.


Edited by technonymous, 03 November 2016 - 05:53 PM.


#14 waterbattle

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 07:08 AM

Hi guys this has been resolved. Me and my manager used Ghost to clone it and it works.






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