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Load balancer worth renewing?


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#1 StevepsuCUIT

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 03:55 AM

I took over as IT manager for a smb that had a very poor IT manager for several years due to lack of CEO knowledge in the field, and such our managed service provider has its claws deep and has a device/maintenance contract for virtually every part of the network.

Which leads me into my question. Renewal/support is coming up for our load balancers, but on our near 100% virtualized network with 2 esxi hosts (1 backup esxi at different location), we have no in house Web servers, nor do we have any application spanning across multiple servers. Due to being a credit union, most all software being used is either on our "core" server, or is installed and used locally (Office suite, Adobe suites etc). Also just one on site exchange VM with roughly 40 mailboxes.

Is there any reason to continue replacing and renewing these load balancers when nothing I'm aware of is being "balanced", or is this another situation where I found our MSP selling everything to the former IT manager because they said he needed it.

Thank you all for any and all responses as this is my first post (longtime lurker)

-Steve

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#2 Wand3r3r

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 08:19 AM

It is a common mistake for those new to a job to assume the previous job owner didn't do things right.  It is usually based on a lack of understanding of how the system was put together.

 

Under similar circumstances we had load balancers due to a clinical application and exchange in a vm environment.

 

I would suggest you dig into the configurations of everything and document these configurations.  Doing do may give you a different view of the situation.



#3 StevepsuCUIT

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 07:29 PM

Wanderer,

Appreciate the advice. But I assure you the former IT manager was no genius. We were paying 16k a year for "Server maintenance" which upon reading was essentially the MSP creating folders on servers and assigning permissions. Our "core" is a single server platform with a hot backup ready, and the rest of the environment is all VM's, each with a specific function but no web serving and no applications or services spanning across multiple servers.

So the question stands, is there any benefit of keeping a load balancer if there is no specific application or website servers being balanced?

Thanks again

-Steve

Edited by StevepsuCUIT, 19 October 2016 - 07:30 PM.


#4 Wand3r3r

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Posted 19 October 2016 - 10:06 PM

I have never been a fan of farming out IT work.  But depending on staff [level of expertise and cost] outsourcing can be a viable alternative.

 

You ask for an answer to a question, find out for yourself by turning one of them off for a day. 






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