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Power Supply Question


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#1 Jasonderland

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 07:31 AM

I'm upgrading my PC & wondering if my current Corsair VX550 PSU is good enough. I've had it for approx. 4-5 years.

 

My new specs are:

 

Windows 10 Home 64Bit

Intel Core i5 6600k

8GB DDR4 Ram

ASUS Z170 Pro Gaming Mobo

NVIDIA 970GTX 4GB

3 x SSD (500gb, 120gb & 60gb)

500gb HD

ASUS Xonar DX Sound Card

 

I'm planning to OC the CPU a little.


Edited by Jasonderland, 11 October 2016 - 10:26 AM.


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#2 dc3

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 09:14 AM

There is one problem with PSUs, they have electrolytic capacitors which breakdown over time which results in a loss of wattage.  4-5 years is long enough to have this type of results, I would suggest purchasing a new PSU for this build.


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#3 Jasonderland

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 09:46 AM

There is one problem with PSUs, they have electrolytic capacitors which breakdown over time which results in a loss of wattage.  4-5 years is long enough to have this type of results, I would suggest purchasing a new PSU for this build.

Thanks for the advice. Would you suggest another 550w or something a little higher?



#4 Drillingmachine

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 03:14 PM

What's your upgrade BTW?

 

Good quality 550W is enough for those parts.



#5 Jasonderland

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 05:06 PM

The upgrades are highlighted in red

 

Windows 10 Home 64Bit

Intel Core i5 6600k

8GB DDR4 Ram

ASUS Z170 Pro Gaming Mobo

NVIDIA 970GTX 4GB

3 x SSD (500gb, 120gb & 60gb)

500gb HD

ASUS Xonar DX Sound Card

 

I'm planning to OC the CPU a little.


Edited by hamluis, 12 October 2016 - 11:10 AM.
Removed unnecessary quotebox - Hamluis.


#6 Jasonderland

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 10:23 PM

I've read that replacing these components might result in Windows not loading. Is this true?


Edited by hamluis, 12 October 2016 - 11:10 AM.


#7 Drillingmachine

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 03:59 AM

Possible and if you have OEM Windows, changing motherboard may expire OEM license. You probably can use Windows activation troubleshooter though.

What are old motherboard/CPU?

#8 dc3

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 08:35 AM

If this is a OEM computer the Windows operating system the operating system is tied to that computer.  OEM versions will recognized the new motherboard and new CPU which will result in the computer not being able to be activated. 

 

If this is a retail copy you can transfer your copy of Windows to another computer as long as this is only used on one computer at any time.

 

Your parts list shows that you are going to be installing Windows 10 on a new SSD.  I'm guessing that you are going to purchase or have purchased a retail copy of Windows?


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#9 Drillingmachine

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 10:23 AM

If this is a OEM computer the Windows operating system the operating system is tied to that computer.  OEM versions will recognized the new motherboard and new CPU which will result in the computer not being able to be activated.


Not so simple any more, as creating Microsoft account gives some benefits:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20527/windows-10-activation-troubleshooter
 

If you recently made a significant hardware change to your device, such as replacing the motherboard, Windows might no longer be activated on your device.

If you linked your Microsoft account to your Windows 10 digital license on the device before you make the hardware change, you can reactivate Windows using your sign in info:

 

But of course there is fun part:

 

If you’re signed in using the correct Microsoft account, here are some additional reasons why you can’t reactivate Windows:

You reached the limit on the number of times you can reactivate Windows on your device.

 

It's possible that is 1 to OEM licences but if it is, then why Microsoft is not telling it directly?



#10 dc3

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 11:04 AM

The following is a quote from a ZD Net article regarding activation of Windows 10, but also addresses what components can be changed without ramifications, and what still can't be changed without activation problems with OEM computers.

 

"For more than a decade, one of the keys that Microsoft's activation servers have relied on is a unique ID, which is based on a hash of your hardware.  Microsoft doesn't provide details of how it calculates that hardware hash, but upgrades of system components such as a video card or a hard drive won't normally trigger a reactivation. If that happens, a quick call to the activation line will resolve the issue, often without any human contact required, in minutes.

The one exception is a motherboard replacement, which will inevitably cause the Software Licensing Management utility to recognize the device as a new PC and require reactivation, typically over the phone. A motherboard upgrade, even if you reuse storage, video, memory, and a case, is considered a new PC. In that case, if the underlying Windows license is from a retail copy, that license can be transferred. If you are upgrading (and not replacing) a motherboard on an OEM PC that was sold with Windows preinstalled, the license agreement prevents the license from being transferred."

 

As for activation of Windows 10, once a successful installation of the operating system is completed the operating system will automatically activate in the future.


Edited by dc3, 12 October 2016 - 11:07 AM.

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#11 Drillingmachine

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 12:33 PM

The following is a quote from a ZD Net article regarding activation of Windows 10, but also addresses what components can be changed without ramifications, and what still can't be changed without activation problems with OEM computers.

 
That article is written long before W10 Anniversary edition so it's possibly no longer valid. As seen here:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change
 

In Windows 10 (Version 1607 or later), you can link your Microsoft account to the Windows 10 digital license on your device. This can help you reactivate Windows using the Activation troubleshooter if you make a significant hardware change later, such as replacing the motherboard.

 

If it's really that simple (OEM license allows no motherboard change), why Microsoft says it that way? Too bad that that article does not say anything about retail or OEM. It's possible that amount of hardware changes is 0 for OEM licences but hard to tell without trying. Whole Windows 10 activation is pretty messy.
 

If you are upgrading (and not replacing) a motherboard on an OEM PC that was sold with Windows preinstalled, the license agreement prevents the license from being transferred."

 

I think we have discussed this legality issues before. Different countries, different laws, different parts of licence agreement apply.

I think I will test this when I have more time.

@Jasonderland: if you change motherboard, it's good idea to make Microsoft account before changing motherboard. That way you perhaps can re-activate Windows. I don't know where you're living so I won't talk about legality, just if re-activation can be done.



#12 Jasonderland

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 01:20 PM

Possible and if you have OEM Windows, changing motherboard may expire OEM license. You probably can use Windows activation troubleshooter though.

What are old motherboard/CPU?

It was a boxed copy of Windows 7 which I've upgraded to Windows 10

 

Old Mobo is Gigabyte P55m-UD2 & the CPU is an i5 760



#13 Jasonderland

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 01:23 PM

If this is a OEM computer the Windows operating system the operating system is tied to that computer.  OEM versions will recognized the new motherboard and new CPU which will result in the computer not being able to be activated. 

 

If this is a retail copy you can transfer your copy of Windows to another computer as long as this is only used on one computer at any time.

 

Your parts list shows that you are going to be installing Windows 10 on a new SSD.  I'm guessing that you are going to purchase or have purchased a retail copy of Windows?

It's a boxed version of Windows 7 upgraded to Windows 10. I'll be using the existing SSD that the OS is on. There's another post which I've highlighted red the upgrades.



#14 Drillingmachine

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 02:09 PM

So it's retail then. But I still suggest you make Microsoft account first.

 

What are old parts you are upgrading from?


Edited by Drillingmachine, 12 October 2016 - 02:09 PM.


#15 Jasonderland

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 02:10 PM

So it's retail then. But I still suggest you make Microsoft account first.

 

What are old parts you are upgrading from?

Yes I already have a Microsoft account.

 

Old Mobo is Gigabyte P55m-UD2 & the CPU is an i5 760


Edited by Jasonderland, 12 October 2016 - 02:33 PM.





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