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Deleting unwanted File History files


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#1 clayto

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 08:36 AM

Is there any reason why I should not delete unwanted File History files, which occupy several Gigs of much needed storage? Not only are many of them now redundant, large numbers were not wanted in the first place. An example of this is numerous jpeg images of music album artwork which I had no intention of downloading but were saved automatically when searching online music. Another is discarded photos and video clips, which were not deliberately saved because they were unsatisfactory. Why would one want to keep dud photos? And of course there is a great deal of duplication too.

 

It does not seem that File History backup is compressed, hence making the wasted space worse.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 08:49 AM

Why not use File History's built in configuration options such that it minimizes the space used?  The default setting on File History is to keep files (and their versions when versions have been saved) forever, which for most of us is just plain stupid.

 

Open File History and have a look at the Advanced Settings, where you can do things like shorten the retention period (mine is now 6 months) and/or change how frequently versioning of a given file occurs [which is hourly and can result in a huge number of versions of a file that you're actively working on in any program].  There is also a link just beneath those settings to Clean up versions, which allows you to use File History to do a controlled delete of backed up files. 

 

Your query just triggered me to do a Clean up versions where I chose to wipe out anything but the latest version (while the default setting for that is anything older than 1 year).  You can always employ this feature to get rid of anything and everything older than a variety of time periods given in the dropdown box.


Edited by britechguy, 07 October 2016 - 08:54 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#3 clayto

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 07:19 AM

Thanks --- good suggestions which I will make use of. I have only recently seen the options for File History, I should now be able to stop the new File History Folder growing so much (several Gigs). I have now selected a new larger memory HDD in place of a nearly full SD card, for new files --- plus renaming the existing folder as .old and moving it to the HDD as well. Some system files would not move so I would like to know if there is any downside to deleting them. Most are oodles of old .thumbs, and a number of desktop.ini fines. I have noticed that .thumbs are one of the main targets for several junk cleaning tools.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 08:08 AM

I can't see that there's and downside to cleaning up any drive that you intend to use for something else after it's been in use as a File History drive.

 

I thought when you switched drives File History even gave you the option of moving your existing File History store from old one to the new one and deleted it from the old drive afterward, but I'm obviously wrong on that.  It's been a long time since I had to replace or exchange a File History drive on a system that's had File History in active use.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 





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