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Multiple ISPs Multiple LANs


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#1 florm

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 10:41 PM

Would the configuration in the attached picture allow computers in LAN1 get a DHCP address from ISP2 and visa-versa?

 

lansetup.jpg

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#2 Wand3r3r

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 10:57 PM

Pretty simple homework. What do you think the answer is?



#3 florm

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Posted 06 October 2016 - 11:34 PM

I want the clients in LAN1 to only get DHCP address from ISP1 and clients in LAN2 to only get DHCP addresses from ISP2.

LAN1 and LAN2 will be on the same subnet

ISP1 and ISP2 will have a LAN address in the same subnet.

Router on ISP1 will have DHCP address 192.168.0.10-20, router on ISP2 will have DHCP address 192.168.0.21-31



#4 Wand3r3r

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 01:56 PM

Ever heard of ip reservations?



#5 florm

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 02:28 PM

Yes. I was going to use static IPs. Im not a network person, first one Im putting together and just wanted to know what the behavior would be in this setup.

The facility is using the second ISP connection to maximize the number of clients. Each ISP is the highest tier service, I have to make sure that LAN1's gateway is always router on ISP1 and visa versa.



#6 Wand3r3r

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 04:32 PM

You can do it statically or you can use dhcp to set them static via ip reservations.

 

Professionally speaking you should have a dual wan port router that is configured to load balance/failover the two connections.  Much better way to go.



#7 florm

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Posted 07 October 2016 - 05:13 PM

Thanks, are there routers that offer more than dual port? Im thinking expansion, in case more clients are added and they max out the two existing ISP connections.



#8 Wand3r3r

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 01:23 PM

Usually in that case you go with higher bandwidth providers not more providers.  At a certain point bonding connections does not deliver true bandwidth.  For example I had bonded T1's which should give 3mbps but found I was only getting 2mbps .  Not worth the expense.  Went with Comcast internet and did a site to site vpn between the two locations at 10mbps.



#9 florm

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 09:51 PM

Yes, thank you. We have limited tiered service to the facility and each Internet connection is at the highest tier. So Im planning on not bonding but limiting the amount of clients that can access each internet connection and yet keep them all on the same subnet. I was thinking the above diagram would work if I give each router a LAN address on the same subnet and not overlap any client IP addresses.



#10 Wand3r3r

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 10:50 PM

That would certainly work.  I would highly advise you use dhcp servers to manage your ip assignments.  You don't have to visit all the machines as you would to set manual static assignments.  It gives you a tool to centrally manage the ip addressing of the network.

 

All you need to change is the gateway entry.  Use the closest public dns server.

 

setup an excel spreadsheet containing all of the device host names as well as mac addresses [I would log wifi and wired connections]

next you need to know how much bandwidth each of your clients need.  you use this to determine how many clients you can fit on one isp supplied line.

that in turn will decide whether you go with a class c or a class b address scheme depending on how many clients you have.


Edited by Wand3r3r, 09 October 2016 - 10:53 PM.





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